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The Tech Boom did not die...it just moved east

ab parashar
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 130
http://www.mercurynewsphoto.com/new_india/main.html
David O'Meara
Rancher

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 13459

rather than just posting links, please try to have an opinion, or atleast describe what people are clicking so they know what they are getting into. A link with no context isn't very useful.

For the record, it is a simple flash movie which is basically a bit of Indian propoganda (my description, not theirs)
Karthik Guru
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 1209
Originally posted by David O'Meara:

is basically a bit of Indian propoganda (my description, not theirs)


Absolutely! People got to be here to see whats going on. There are tons of jobs but more_jobs != more_pay and most of the nice villas are owned by non-resident indians that are returning home.
ab parashar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 130
Reverse brain drain

http://www.siliconvalley.com/mld/siliconvalley/business/technology/13332133.htm

India, which for decades watched its best young engineers and educated workers seek their fortunes in the United States, has begun to benefit from a reverse brain drain. It's now luring technologists and managers back home to participate in the tech revolution and help elevate India on the innovation ladder. The flow of returnees has been a boon to Bangalore -- and other Indian cities -- which have a dearth of professionals to lead a talented but inexperienced tech workforce as the world economic order is re- arranged.

For the returnees, going home often means a chance to make a bigger professional impact or dive into an exciting, challenging new venture. They also get to be near family once again, and enjoy a lifestyle in a country where their incomes go a lot further. For those going from Silicon Valley to Bangalore -- a city of 6.5 million in southern India -- it even means returning to an area with temperate Bay Area-like weather.
ab parashar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 130
Target audience: Indians living abroad,looking to move to India...

In Silicon Valley, people say, `We want to change the world.' In India, the guy says, `Change my paycheck,' '' Kondamoori said. ``It's a mercenary mentality.''
Karthik Guru
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 1209
Its really amusing. Just look around the forum and see how many people are struggling to find one decent techy development project to hone their skills and they call it a tech boom...duh.
ab parashar
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Joined: Mar 28, 2005
Posts: 130
Indian IT companies are hiring about 150 new recruits a day...a day!!
The salaries that these companies pay are quite decent with respect to the society people live in.

If you do not think this is a boom then probably you do not know what a downturn is and what it takes to ride it out.
Kripal Singh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 26, 2001
Posts: 254
This is not a tech boom . What we see here is a small cross section of society which enjoyed good times in West now having good times in East . Does not apply to a regular Techie .


# Help an unprivileged kid.<br /> Whatever u do will make a difference...<br /> ...to a child's life & ur own #<br /><a href="http://www.cry.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">www.cry.org/</a>
Bhiku Mhatre
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 08, 2002
Posts: 127
Ab Parashar,
you sound hopelessly complacent. The indian shops are going through the same phase silicon valley went through once(boom and burst). The bubble is about to burst. Silicon valley has survived the burst because it is innovative. It keep creating new products. Indian shops does not have anything more than code typing monkeys(no offence meant). Already there is trend of closing the shops in India and moving to the west(for quality and project management reasons).
Watch out for three more years and you will see that Indian shops are reduced to the ash. It would be a failure of gigantic proportion we have not seen before. Clock is already ticking.
[ December 06, 2005: Message edited by: Bhiku Mhatre ]

The difference between winner and loser is making things happen and letting things happen.
Devesh H Rao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2002
Posts: 687

Originally posted by Bhiku Mhatre:
........

[ December 06, 2005: Message edited by: Bhiku Mhatre ]


Nice signature.... BM ...so do you belive in it or is it just one of those signatures...?
rehans oberoi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 06, 2005
Posts: 174
can anybody tell me what is the reason of IT boom
in india. what makes it boom suddenly and than burst.
waht are the market forces that make boom.
Karthik Guru
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 1209
Originally posted by Kripal Singh:
What we see here is a small cross section of society which enjoyed good times in West now having good times in East . Does not apply to a regular Techie .


Very well put. It w'd have been better if the original flash image had depicted scores of people waiting in a line outside a s/w company to attend a walk-in. That sounds more reasonable,closer to the truth - what we are seeing here at the moment - that the boom is just about "numbers". To equate it to villas and believe that it indeed is the truth is frankly , amusing.
Victor Banerjee
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 30, 2005
Posts: 88
Originally posted by Bhiku Mhatre:
Ab Parashar,
you sound hopelessly complacent. The indian shops are going through the same phase silicon valley went through once(boom and burst). The bubble is about to burst. Silicon valley has survived the burst because it is innovative. It keep creating new products. Indian shops does not have anything more than code typing monkeys(no offence meant). Already there is trend of closing the shops in India and moving to the west(for quality and project management reasons).
Watch out for three more years and you will see that Indian shops are reduced to the ash. It would be a failure of gigantic proportion we have not seen before. Clock is already ticking.

[ December 06, 2005: Message edited by: Bhiku Mhatre ]


That's probably extrapolating some project management issues to the entire industry.

Indian IT industry right now is too big to burst in a period of 3 years. I do not see any signs right now of a burst. There may be layoffs but that would be purely due to miscalculations by some companies on the project pipelines and not due to any flaw in the offshore model.

The model works like a charm. 80% of the work in software is repetitive maintainence kind of work. This work can be easily offshored and that is what has happened. Talks of moving up the value chain, doing consultancy is all BS. This work needs to be done nearshore closely working with the clients. Although the research part can be offshored I don't see it working that well. But that's just 20% of the work and who cares even if it doesnt come offshore. The offshore works simply by delivering average code at a low cost and high quality factor. The quality can be compromised (corrected by nearshore team) to some extent since the low cost more than covers this.

So it seems at least for the next 20-30 years the industry is going to remain strong. I don't think most of the people in this group care beyond that.

* I have referred offshore everyone since its not just India but any of the cheap labour countries including China, Romania which are these days picking up.
[ December 07, 2005: Message edited by: Victor Banerjee ]
Amitabh Reddy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 15, 2005
Posts: 59
Originally posted by Victor Banerjee:



So it seems at least for the next 20-30 years the industry is going to remain strong. I don't think most of the people in this group care beyond that.


[ December 07, 2005: Message edited by: Victor Banerjee ]


I wish I could share your optimism. Can you really forsee that far in future?

Some glimpses of the world 20 years ago. Judge yourself where is the world today.

World had two superpowers.

Japanese economy was predicted(or feared by americans) to outgrow US economy.

There was no German equivalent for terms like "recession/economic doldrum/unemployment". The only word was "wirtschaftswunder"(economic miracle). Today(almost for last decade) it is the worst performing economy in OECD.

The Brits were refered to as "sick man of Europe". Currently Europes(??) best performing economy.
[ December 07, 2005: Message edited by: Amitabh Reddy ]
Devesh H Rao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2002
Posts: 687

Each and every country faces the up's as well as the down's on a periodic basis. Good times and bad times are cyclic in nature and it is no way it can be consistent just as anything else in nature.

It is what you do when you are in a upswing that decides how well you cope up with the down's, something very similar to the story of the grasshopper and the ant. The ant works hard during summer when the going is good and stocks up on food while the grasshopper idle's away the time only to starve.

It's basically the same common sense which needs to be applied to the up's and down's in any industry as well. You learn hard lessons when you are down which eventually helps you perform much better when you are on a upswing.

The IT industry went for a tailspin in 2000-2001 with many layoffs and substantial churn which sort of better equipped the people in charge to face the same churn in a slightly better way the next time round.

It is a matter of perception is what I say, there is always a positive side if you want to look at it, but even the most ideal of situations will have its drawbacks.

There is no elevator to success and the only way you can reach the top is by taking the steps.

what I sometimes fail to understand is why do people always have "the sky is falling down syndrome", if something is going to end it will but is that a valid enough reason to run down something that works.

Just as an example, India had a very extensive textile industry before it was decimated by the cheaper and mass produced textiles from the industralized west, but the lessons were learnt and it is kicking back into form. Same is the case with any industry be it manufacturing or IT or services.
Nothing ends, you only learn from the downturns if you keep your eyes open.


Microsoft


Intel

AMD

This surely does not mean India is the next techno super power, it sure isn't unless we change our mindsets to change and learn.

The west especially the US is so far ahead in technology that the gap will take years to bridge and that too if we keep up the pace, but that also does not mean that the gap can't be bridged.

If only we could think what's in it for us rather than whats in it for me for a change.
[ December 07, 2005: Message edited by: Devesh H Rao ]
Anand Prabhu
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Joined: Dec 19, 2003
Posts: 299
Originally posted by Devesh H Rao:

Just as an example, India had a very extensive textile industry before it was decimated by the cheaper and mass produced textiles from the industralized west, but the lessons were learnt and it is kicking back into form.


You have good points, Devesh. But I differ with you on this industry. India is nowhere near its potential in the textile industry. With the lifting of the quota per WTO in US and EU this year, India should have been ready and could very easily have shone. Just compare China's exports in textiles. India should have been running shoulder to shoulder with China. But her labor rules, infrastructure and lack of government support have ensured that China has an indomitable lead at least for the next few years.
Devesh H Rao
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2002
Posts: 687

Originally posted by Anand Prabhu:


But her labor rules, infrastructure and lack of government support have ensured that China has an indomitable lead at least for the next few years.


Who said anything about being the leader in textile industry, I meant the shape of the same 2 decades back and now. 20 years back the textile industry was a relic and could so very easily destroyed by the more lean and cost efficient industries. The same is not the case now, the industry has matured no doubt not to an extent that the chinese have but the indian industry sure has learnt from the debacle from the past and are now in much better shape than before and will not be so easily swept aside, it may still happen but it won't definately be as easy as before. That is the good part of failing, coz you know what to expect and are better prepared next time around. "No failure" is a myth and someone who belives that no bad can happen gets the worst in a downturn.


I say why compare with china, its a different culture, different work ethics different society.
I do not know much about china but I guess they are more driven to make a success out of what they have and hence the growth rate.

China is a success story as I see it, but what is happening in reality is something for its citizens to decide. I can talk for India as I have a stake in it.

Just a case in point, the three gorges dam and the sardar sarover project. 3 gorges project is so very much huge and on a bigger scale than the sardar sarover but have you ever heard any opposition to the former as compared to the latter.

I am trying to compare India as I knew 10 years back to what it is now. I see more energy and the need to succeed more than what I saw a decade back.

The focus in India is so much on services especially IT that the good results and growth of the manufacturing, financials and other sector's are so very much ignored or rather pushed to the background.

After all that, I think I need a , I am off to MD.... care to join for a
 
 
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