• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Choice of database

 
Christian Nash
Ranch Hand
Posts: 107
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi people,

I was just wondering as to what were the factors depending on which choice of a particular type of database like MYSQL or Oracle or any other is made.
 
Scott Selikoff
author
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 4008
18
Eclipse IDE Flex Google Web Toolkit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Money.

MySQL is free to use for most small projects whereas Oracle, MS SqlServer, and DB2 have pretty big bills associated with them.

As far as choosing between the 3 its then a matter of whether or not you have the technical resources available. Oracle is probably the best and most powerful but if you don't have a dedicated Oracle expert available, you're not likely to get very far (or take advantage of the advanced features). SqlServer is probably the easiest to use but has the least amount of features, whereas DB2 I feel falls somewhere in between.

As an example of advanced Oracle features... distributed transaction coordination among multiple db servers, materialized views, good index tuning.. and probably a lot more....
[ June 16, 2006: Message edited by: Scott Selikoff ]
 
Jeroen T Wenting
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1847
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And of course performance, availabillity (some servers might not be available for your chosen hardware/OS platform), existing skills (maybe you already have several Oracle DBAs and no overwhelming reason to not use Oracle), etc. etc.
 
Scott Selikoff
author
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 4008
18
Eclipse IDE Flex Google Web Toolkit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Maybe I should elaborate a little more... the choice in database is rarely an arbitrary thing (unless upper management is involved). For the most part, you look at which database will best meet your needs based on what skill sets you have. If no one knows how to use SqlServer, it means more time/money will needed to be spent training people on how to use it as well as hiring a SqlServer DBA.

It really helps to have a good idea of the size of the data and the frequency of transactions. For example, if you have only one transaction a day and very little data, you mind as well use a text file. If you have a few hundred a day, free programs like MySql will do the job. If you have thousands or millions a day, then some serious thought has be done on even how to design the system for proper concurrency.

The choice of a good database can be a very complicated decision but I've found that in the end it comes down to whatever's the cheapest that can handle the minimum load.
 
Jeff Albertson
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1780
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What do you think Google is putting in here

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/14/technology/14search.html?_r=1&oref=slogin
 
Edwin Keeton
Ranch Hand
Posts: 214
IntelliJ IDE Java Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just to add more fuel, there are other "free" databases that have quite a bit of horsepower. My favorite "intermediate" database is Firebird (fka Interbase). And Postgresql provides about 90% of the firepower of Oracle and DB2 for "free". And the big db vendors have "free" versions with various restrictions (limited number of users, limited db size, etc.)

In my experience, companies that ask for database recommendations don't need a commercial database (i.e. Oracle, DB2, MSSQL, etc.) In other words, if you need the big iron, you'll know you need it.

It's also my experience, unfortunately, that politics usually trumps all else in this decision. "It's Microsoft!", or the Oracle sales rep is really cute, tend to hold greater sway at the management decision making level.
 
Scott Selikoff
author
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 4008
18
Eclipse IDE Flex Google Web Toolkit
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Edwin Keeton:
It's also my experience, unfortunately, that politics usually trumps all else in this decision. "It's Microsoft!", or the Oracle sales rep is really cute, tend to hold greater sway at the management decision making level.


Agreed, that's exactly what I meant when I said choosing a database isn't arbitrary unless upper management is involved... then it comes down to "which company do we employ 2 full members of and have we all ready given a truckload of money to for some other product... ok we'll go with them...". The worst part is decisions like this are made and developers are stuck with the results no matter what, or fired (driven out) because they can't spin straw into gold.
 
Martin Simons
Ranch Hand
Posts: 196
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Jeff Albertson:
What do you think Google is putting in here

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/14/technology/14search.html?_r=1&oref=slogin


That's the Google Death Ray out of the Dilbert Strip.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic