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J2EE vs. ASP/ASP.NET

 
Hal Taylor
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This is sort of a general question, but I've been looking for opinions for awhile. While I realize there may be a bias here, can anyone *with ASP and/or .NET experience* give me a comparison of what sorts of things might be possible in M$'s environment that might not be possible (or might be significantly more difficult) in a J2EE environment? I keep hearing about what a capable environment ASP (especially ASP.NET) is, but I don't have any experience with that platform and can't assess relative merits of that versus J2EE.

So: opinions? (I'm not looking for general M$-bashing, but rather a balanced and informed analysis of relative strengths and weakness of the two platforms).

Thanks in advance.
 
Jeroen Wenting
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I've never heard of a company called M$...
 
Prakash Dwivedi
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Hi Taylor,
One of the many advantages of using J2EE is that it is platform independent. After writing the code, developer can choose which OS is best suited. Also developer can choose any Application Server, from JBoss which is free to Websphere / Weblogic which provides better functionalities, depending upon his requirements.

regards
 
somkiat puisungnoen
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Compare J2EE VS .NET platform
http://www.theserverside.com/articles/article.tss?l=J2EE-vs-DOTNET

http://java.oreilly.com/news/farley_0800.html

http://www.javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-03-2002/jw-0308-j2eenet.html


I think, this will help you.
 
Mo Gupta
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Hal,
As you have correctly marked M$'s that is not the case with J2EE.
J2EE is growing in market since it is unlike M'soft not Sun spcific, solutions are delivered through many vendors across the market. This keeps J2EE upto date, competitive and perfect, just a small example..world has made a mistake to start adopting with Windows and now we see how we pay off for security patches, handicapped by M'soft.
- Manoj.
 
Hal Taylor
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Thanks for all the feedback. The links posted were interesting, but were mostly old, published before ASP.NET was in use, and didn't really address fine details of capabilities from a hands-on developer's perspective. A large point is made about portability and ability to integrate with legacy systems, but less really about functionality. My understanding is that M$ intends to move away from ASP.NET with Longhorn, so that may be a potential trap, but I'm still interested in what strong advantages the current .NET platform might offer (I want to know what everyone is raving about, in terms of capabilities of the environment). Has anyone out there spent time in .NET and developed opinions on how it stacks up to J2EE, from a hands-on point of view?

Thanks again.
 
Paul Sturrock
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I have deployed one .NET app into production. I haven't really delved too deeply into its capabilities (and I doubt you'll get many J2EE developers who have, since .NET is certainly comparable with J2EE in terms of scale). What I can say is the CLR was pretty good - we could develop WebControls in a bunch of different langauges (in fact we did this, but more to see if we could than for any decent development reason). Its support for web services and SOAP seems much more mature than J2EE. And the development environment was leagues ahead of anything avaliable in the Java world. In fact - and I'm a little embarassed to admit this - when I first started to work with it, I was able to build most of the front end web app without really having any clue what I was doing.

Still, a word of warning: this sort of discussion tends to generate a huge amount of FUD, since very few developers out there have actually used both J2EE and .NET to any great degreee in production systems. Plenty have run tests, built demo apps etc. But how much can you learn from deploying a PetStore application exactly as you are directed by the documentation?

Of course, unless you are a pretty senior Technical Architect in an organisation where both Java and Microsoft developers are freely avaliable, the decision to use one technology over the other is never likely to be yours. A far greater driver will probably be client/market place demands, licencing costs, avaliable support knowledge etc.
 
Hal Taylor
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Originally posted by Paul Sturrock:
I have deployed one .NET app into production. I haven't really delved too deeply into its capabilities (and I doubt you'll get many J2EE developers who have, since .NET is certainly comparable with J2EE in terms of scale). What I can say is the CLR was pretty good - we could develop WebControls in a bunch of different langauges (in fact we did this, but more to see if we could than for any decent development reason). Its support for web services and SOAP seems much more mature than J2EE. And the development environment was leagues ahead of anything avaliable in the Java world.
<snip>


Aha - this is sort of what I was getting at. Thanks!



Still, a word of warning: this sort of discussion tends to generate a huge amount of FUD, since very few developers out there have actually used both J2EE and .NET to any great degreee in production systems.
<snip>


Yep - I was a little concerned about this, too. Fortunately, so far, people seem to have refrained from that and have made an effort to stay objective. But this is why I had hoped to find someone who gotten his hands dirty a bit in .NET.

Thanks again for your perspective.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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