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MS SQL Server in Java/JEE environment

 
Sudhakar Chavali
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Dear all,

I wanted to understand pros and cons of choosing MS SQL Server in Java/J2EE environment.

Could anybody share some thoughts or web resources?

Personally I hate using MS SQL Server for Java/J2EE based applications. But one of my clients wanted to have following environment for his production environment and he insist on using this environment for application development. So I just wanted to understand pros and cons of J2EE (Application) + MS SQL Server ( rdbms )

MS SQL Server
J2EE/Flex
Windows OS

Thanks
Sudhakar
 
Joe Ess
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Originally posted by Sudhakar Chavali:

Personally I hate using MS SQL Server for Java/J2EE based applications.


Any particular reason?
Most of my database experience is with Oracle, but what I've seen of MS SQL Server I have liked. It has a nice integrated user interface. Oracle's user interface is primitive, cryptic and spread across numerous apps.
It has an auto increment type whereas Oracle insists one jump through hoops setting up a sequence and trigger.
Data Transfer Services is a lifesaver if one has numerous data sources that have to be scrubbed and imported.
If the client wants MS SQL Server, use it. One of the great things about Java's APIs is vendor-independence, being able to pick and choose the various tools for a job. Don't tick off your client just because he wanted you to use Brand X hammer rather than your preferred Brand y.
 
Roger Chung-Wee
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Which J2EE application server are you using? Do you have reason to believe that the app server/driver/database combination will not work?
 
Sudhakar Chavali
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Dear All

Thank you for your responses. I have worked in both Microsoft and non MS based environments. Personally I know the power of .Net with MS SQL Server and I don't wanted to compromise on using MS SQL Server with Java/JEE environment just for some reasons that Jave/JEE environment have.

I don't hate MS or non MS products but using these products in heterogeneous environment is bit weird to me. That is the reason I started investigating the power of J2EE with MS SQL Server


Thanks
Sudhakar
[ March 20, 2008: Message edited by: Sudhakar Chavali ]
 
Joe Ess
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Originally posted by Sudhakar Chavali:
I don't wanted to compromise on using MS SQL Server with Java/JEE environment just for some reasons that Jave/JEE environment have.


I think you are drawing distinctions where they don't exist. As far as Java's concerned MS SQL is just another database and it is not at all unusual to build J2EE apps on top of it.
 
Paul Sturrock
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MSSQL is fine for Java apps. There are good, free JDBC drivers out there: jTDS and MS's 2005 version for example.

MSSQL does have draw backs - its locking implementation is poor and its security model is basic for example. But these are problems that exist wether you use Java to connect to it or .Net. J2EE doesn't make the situation any worse.
 
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