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US Job Market Hot Spots

 
Mark Herschberg
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CNN has an article today entitled at "America's hottest job markets"

http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2007/biz2/0704/gallery.jobs_markets.biz2/index.html

In nearly all of the job markets (I think either 13 or 14 of the 15 they list) one or more technical roles are listed (usually senior software engineer, or IT project manager).

--Mark
[ April 26, 2007: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]
 
Joe Ess
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The Hottest Jobs: #1. Computer Programmer from the same article.
Of course, in the market I'm in (Ohio), a "hot" market means that you have a job!
 
Jay Dilla
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Yes I seen the same article, and recently a senior developer coworker of mine was saying that the US market for programmers is on the upswing. Maybe the days of high salary and anyone who can turn on a computer getting a job will return. My question is what exactly is a "senior developer"? I only been in the industry 6 months so obviously it excludes me, but aren't senior developers normally people with 3-5 yrs experience?
They make $90K in the US?
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jay Dilla:
Maybe the days of high salary and anyone who can turn on a computer getting a job will return.


Let's hope not! Low standards and high pay are what drove the resentment against IT and when the bubble burst the labor market was not well aligned, i.e. someone who maybe $90k for knowing how to turn on a computer suddenly found himself without skills in demand and unable to find employment.



Originally posted by Jay Dilla:
Yes I seen the same article, and recently a senior developer coworker of mine was saying that the US market for programmers is on the upswing.

...

My question is what exactly is a "senior developer"?


The market has been strong for the past 18 months (YMMV by geographic market). Currently I would liken it to fall of 1998.

"Senior developer" can mean many things. Traditionally it meant 10-15years experience and that's what it sill means at a few companies. At many others, however, it can mean someone who has been around 3+ years.

My sense from seeing different positions and companies it that usually refers to someone with 4-7 years of experience on average.


--Mark
 
Jay Dilla
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When the market is "Strong" what actually does that mean? Does that mean all programmers with some degree of experience should be getting good offers, or does it mean *good* programmers with some degree of experience should be getting good offers?
That's why I brought up the days of anybody being able to turn on a computer getting a job. I remember back when I was in high school, 96-99. Friends of mine were graduating high school and getting system admin. jobs for $60K. It's not like that anymore. And the market still seems pretty tight for college grads or other entry level developers. I guess alot of those entry level type jobs are being outsourced.
 
Henry Wong
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Let's hope not! Low standards and high pay are what drove the resentment against IT and when the bubble burst the labor market was not well aligned, i.e. someone who maybe $90k for knowing how to turn on a computer suddenly found himself without skills in demand and unable to find employment.


And let's hope they moved onto to a different industry. I actually got chastised once, during an interview, because I failed to mention that the job wasn't for a dot com. When a candidate can actually get mad enough to walk out of an interview after being described the position -- having confidence during an interview is great, but wow!!

Henry
 
Eric Lemaitre
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Hi Jay,

When the market is "Strong" what actually does that mean? Does that mean all programmers with some degree of experience should be getting good offers, or does it mean *good* programmers with some degree of experience should be getting good offers?

IMHO it means US companies have real difficulties to hire : California leading pack in tech sector grows.

Friends of mine were graduating high school and getting system admin. jobs for $60K. And the market still seems pretty tight for college grads or other entry level developers. I guess alot of those entry level type jobs are being outsourced.

I guess issue is market always demands before all people with paid experience, which harms beginers, but it is the same issue everywhere.

Please note that while immaterial jobs like software development may be rather easily offshored, it is not at all the case of material jobs like system administrators and network engineers, which may pay less but are much more secure.

Best regards.
 
Varun Khanna
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Nice read.

One interesting point I noted that salary offered to software developer was more than IT Project Manager in all the locations.
So what's the deal here? I might be missing something but in India I don't think this can be at all possible i.e. software developer earning more than the manager. Although I would love see this change happening.
[ April 27, 2007: Message edited by: Varun Khanna ]
 
Mark Herschberg
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"Project Manager" can mean many different things. In some companies it's a developer who wants to shift into less coding and more management. In others it's someone who doesn't code and just wants to manage task lists. In yet others it can mean something else.

--Mark
 
Tim Holloway
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What I liked was that a good many of the cities were in sunny old Florida!

Or smokey, old Florida, lately. Georgia's burning again. Not Sherman's fault this time, though, just the drought.

There were 2 recent listings of cheer to me, one on fastest-growing salaries, the other on tech cities on the upswing. Also saw an article earlier today on the Sunshine State: http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2122677,00.asp

On the less cheering side, however, a lot of those salary quotes seem rather lower than what I'm used to seeing for the region. Either somebody's got a different set of metrics, or things have dropped further than I'd realized.

Other links relating to Florida tech growth:

http://www.physorg.com/news96608823.html

http://atlanta.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2000/10/23/newscolumn2.html (from back in 2000), but there's a big Federal Reserve branch locally, and I suspect that's part of what they're referring to.
 
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