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What are the best recruitment strategies?

Rosie Vogel
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 31, 2001
Posts: 228
I have recently found a new job. One of my responsabilities is finding twenty new Java / .Net developers for my boss. I am in the Netherlands and the job market is booming. Add to that the fact that I have no experience as a recruiter (before I started this job, I used to be a Java developer) and you know I am facing a challenge. I do feel that many software developers would like our small but thriving company, once they got to know it.

So I am wondering: what are good ways to attract their attention? During your career, what employers made a positive impression on you and why? When you applied for a job, what made you pick that particular company you applied to instead of another one?
stephen gates
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2007
Posts: 69
Quick question.

Why did you move from developer to a human resource/recruiter role?

As far as why I choose the jobs i do.

Well not in any particular order but I determine by :

money, benefits, company, technology, location, commute, travel, team, projects, management, history, career advancement, education opportunities, and so on.

I've turned down opportunities because of money, lack of benefits, to far of a commute, no career advancement potential, management seemed arrogant, and so on.

It really depends on the person and what they want. If they are looking for some kind of career advancement beyond just development and programming, a 4 month contract might not be something they are interested in. But if the person wants to learn new technologies but not be tied down to a long term contract and you say 4 month contract, work with JSF, Ajax, java and so on, it might be a fit. You never know.
Rogerio Kioshi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 12, 2005
Posts: 689
Well, I must say that one thing many people search, when they apply to a new job, is salary. More you can pay, more good candidates you'll atract.
But sometimes salary is not enough. For example, if the company gives possibility of growing, courses to learn more, and good work environment, it would be very attractive.


SCEA 5 (part 1), SCBCD, SCWCD, SCJP, CLP, CLS
Rosie Vogel
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 31, 2001
Posts: 228
Originally posted by stephen gates:

Why did you move from developer to a human resource/recruiter role?


Mainly because I thought I just wasn't a good enough developer. I could program, sure, but a lot of other people on the team could do it just as well and a lot faster.

Anyway, enough about me! You both mention money as an important factor. I agree. And while our company doesn't go crazy with money, the salaries they offer are certainly nothing to be ashamed of. But you don't talk about money until you have actually met and sat down together and that is a problem. When I find someone who seems suitable on Monster, they don't even respond to my email. Evidently, I am not hitting the right note.

When you read personel ads (or job offers made through email or some other medium), what makes you tick? Everyone is different, of course, but what about you?
stephen gates
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2007
Posts: 69
It depends on the projects, roles, team, company, experience, and job market. A few years back it was an employers market. Today it's more of a employee's market.

As far as money is concerned, it is one of the first things I ask a recruiter or HR person. I've been in IT for over 10 years so when somebody contacts me, I need to know up front if it's worth it or not. If your a recent college grad, then it might not matter as much but for me, it does. I've been contacted my many recruiters or HR people who ask if i'm interested in a job yet do not tell me anything about it. There are far too many "spam" recruiters out there these days and I want to know as much as possible up front. So if I'm at around 75/Hr and the job only pays 75K per year, then it's not worth it. And i'm not the only person like this.

The more experience you gain, the better you become and if it's a decent job market for employees, it usually means I want to know what I'm getting.

No your not supposed to talk about salary first, but in my experience as a contractor and consultant, it's always the first thing brought up or asked.

From my perspective, I get tired of recruiters contacting me. Most are nothing more than "spam." Many never answer my questions yet want to know if I"m interested. I'm sorry but I don't know if I'm interested if I don't know anything about the job.

I get tired of never hearing anything back from a recruiter after I do submit my resume. I get angry when a recruiter submits me to a job without my permission or without my resume. I know one recruiting agency took my resume off of one of the job boards and submitted it to some company. I only found this out after another recruiting agency that I worked with in the past contacted me about a job, submitted me and then got back to me and said I'd already been submitted by another company for that role. So I don't even like putting my resume up on the job boards anymore.

I get tired of recruiters demanding an answer within 30 minutes. I get tired of recruiters expecting me to relocate 3000 miles for a 4 month contract at a lesser wage. I'm busy just like they are and if I don't know anything about a role and they refuse to give me any specific details, I'll just move along.

For me, most recruiters are just wasting my time. Plain and simple. So if you want my advice as to becoming a better recruiter, don't spam everybody and anybody and try to keep in contact with those you do work with.

If somebody doesn't get a job or an interview, at least get back to them. Maybe you don't know why, but at least tell them. Communication is key and I know I'm not the only one tired of recruiters. There are a few I will work with and others that I simply ignore.

I mean I can update my resume on one of the job boards and the next thing you know, I'll get over a 1000 voice mails and over 1000 emails in less than a weeks time frame. And most are from recruiters or agencies. I don't have time to waste on people who can't even tell me what a job is about, yet alone the company and at the same time they then expect me to make a decision based on that.
Eric Lemaitre
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 03, 2004
Posts: 538

Hi,

So I am wondering: what are good ways to attract their attention? During your career, what employers made a positive impression on you and why? When you applied for a job, what made you pick that particular company you applied to instead of another one?

Consider this : Finding Great Developers

Best regards.


Eric LEMAITRE
CNAM IT Engineer, MS/CS (RHCE, RHCX, SCJA, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, Net+)
Free Online Tutorials: http://www.free-tutorials-online.net/
Rosie Vogel
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 31, 2001
Posts: 228
Been away from computer for a few days. Thanks for that excellent link!

@Stephen: thank you for that response. The behaviour from recruiters you describe ranges from indifferent to downright rude. My mother didn't raise me that way !

What you've experienced might explain the lack of result I get from the job boards. I think I need a different, more personal approach. I'll let you know how it goes.
stephen gates
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2007
Posts: 69
Good for you. Good luck and I wish you the best.. How did you get into recruiting? You say you were a programmer so how did you jump in as a new recruiter?
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
subject: What are the best recruitment strategies?