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Which technology is best to study in parallel

Mark Reyes
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Joined: Jul 09, 2007
Posts: 426
Hi Everyone,

Good Day!!!

I found this nice forum and was hooked reading comments from every poster. So I did take the chance to post my own question and hopefully would like to hear some good suggestion as well.

We were developing desktop application programs using VB and C++. But we had a hard time deploying the apps to multiple terminals at the same terminal. The common solution was to adapt Web programming and Java was chosen as the platform instead of the .Net frameworks.

I bought HFSJ and at the end of the chapter, Struts was introduced. We were able to developed our own web programs (thanks to the ranchers at the forums.. ) using this framework.

Now as I read this forums, J2EE seems to be vast to grasp. I just would like to ask what technology seems to be good to study as well in parallel (w/ JSP/Servlet/Struts)?

I am not yet that good with regards to the 3 but I continue to do some projects and perhaps continue to learn more. Besides that does not stop me from learning other things as well.

I've heard a lot about Hibernate, Spring and JSF.. but honestly I dont know much about them so I dont know if that's the right thing to do.. We can use this also so we could request trainings from training centers.




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Sonny Gill
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Joined: Feb 02, 2002
Posts: 1211

JSP and Servlet technologies are certainly a good start, since they form the basis of most other frameworks and technologies. If you are going to do quite a bit of web development in Java, then regardless of what framework you use, you will need a good grasp on these two.


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Joe Harry
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Joined: Sep 26, 2006
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    2

At any case, you need a firm grasp on Java/JSP/Servlets. The knowledge of these 3 are very much essential and the rest of the frameworks like JSF/Hibernate/Struts/Spring build upon them.


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Joe Ess
Bartender

Joined: Oct 29, 2001
Posts: 8836
    
    7

It depends on what kind of development you are doing, what problems you have and how the next technology can help you.
If you have a database back end, Hibernate may be a good next step. At some point, writing and maintaining your Java-DB code becomes tedious. Hibernate can replace a great deal of that code.
If your front end code is tedious, lots of HTML copied all over the place, then JSF would be a good investment. It can clean up a lot of GUI code with a more object-oriented component approach. Of course, you can get a lot of mileage out of creating custom tags or using 3rd party JSP libraries too.
If you are not happy with Struts (you tire of writing lots of Actions, form objects and so on) Spring may be a better framework for you. It has a number of other features as well (DAO, IOC and so on) which you may find useful.
There's no shortage of interesting technologies that incorporate Java. Just look at the problems you have and I'm sure you can find some new technology that can help with it.
[ December 06, 2007: Message edited by: Joe Ess ]

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Raghavan Muthu
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Joined: Apr 20, 2006
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As Jothi said, no matter what framework you gonna work, a strong foundation on Servlets & Jsp will get you through any framework.


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Imtiyaz Ahmed
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 03, 2007
Posts: 3
A strong foundation of java/jsp/servlet is necessory bcoz all other web framework like struts and JSF are built upon that.
Mark Reyes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 09, 2007
Posts: 426
Hi All,

Thanks for all the valuable suggestion that you have given to me. I'll keep it in my mind.

With regards to what I should study, perhaps I will go with Hibernate for now. My Web projects are all DB intensive and had all my DB query scattered in different packages. Perhaps knowing this may clean up some mess.

I'll stay with Servlet/JSP/Struts for now because there's still so much to learn from all this stuff. But what the heck, there's always the ranchers/bartenders around to the rescue.

Kudos to all..
Sonny Gill
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Joined: Feb 02, 2002
Posts: 1211

Ugh..stay away from Struts if you can help it. If you have the freedom to choose, I suggest Stripes or Wicket.
Billy Tsai
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Joined: May 23, 2003
Posts: 1297
the study of database technologies(e.g. Oracle) in parallel with software technologies(Java etc...) is the best


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Mark Reyes
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jul 09, 2007
Posts: 426
Hi,

Ugh..stay away from Struts if you can help it


Struts was introduced at the last chapter of HFSJ. May I know why it is'nt a good idea to learn this stuff. Thanks.
Joe Harry
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Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9345
    
    2

Struts is easy to learn and to implement. So you should not be having any problem. Probably the guy wants to promote Stripes/Wicket...might be...I've never used those frameworks and it would be a good idea to just explore them.
Joe Ess
Bartender

Joined: Oct 29, 2001
Posts: 8836
    
    7

Originally posted by Jothi Shankar Kumar Sankararaj:
Struts is easy to learn and to implement.


Judging from a recent conference I attended, Struts 1 has a user base ten times the size of any other web/application framework. For certain, Struts 1 has some very big problems, but the ease of use cited by Jothi and the user base insure that we will be dealing with it for quite some time, and that means it is a valuable skill to have in one's toolkit.
arulk pillai
Author
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Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3219
I would suggest you learn Spring/Hibernate/JSF first and then move on to integration technologies like JMS/Web Service. At least some tutorials.


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Sonny Gill
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Joined: Feb 02, 2002
Posts: 1211

Originally posted by Joe Ess:
Struts 1 has a user base ten times the size of any other web/application framework.


Can't argue with that .

Still, I think it is would be good to start learning 'MVC in Java' with another 'better' framework, unless you really need to know Struts for your current job.

Mark, if you do a google search or google blog search, you will find different reasons for why people don't like Struts. Here is one, for example - Stripes vs. Struts.

Struts was the first Java MVC framework, it was good enough for that time I guess, and was used in most of the early projects that needed an MVC framework. But that was a while ago , and other people have developed better frameworks since then.

My suggestion is to learn Struts if you need it for your current project, or you want it on your resume to market yourselves better. If you are learning for fun/exploration, choose something else. Having mostly used Spring MVC, I found it quite easy to pick up Struts when I needed it for a project.
Sonny Gill
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Joined: Feb 02, 2002
Posts: 1211

Originally posted by Jothi Shankar Kumar Sankararaj:
Struts is easy to learn and to implement.


With all due respect, Struts is easy to learn, and a PITA to implement
arulk pillai
Author
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Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3219
Currently using JSF, Facelets and Richfaces in a project and quite like it in terms of rich look and feel, ease of learning etc
[ December 13, 2007: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
 
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