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What to do next?

Billy Bob
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 05, 2004
Posts: 14
I'm getting my B.S. in Computer Science, graduating next year, and had a few questions. I've taken tons of classes in Java, since all of them use it basically, ranging from the basic stuff to data structures. I wouldn't call myself and expert, but I fairly good with Java. Here's where I get to my question. I've been looking at job positions, and that call for Java experience and usually say something about J2EE, JSP, or a bunch of other acronyms. All I've ever had to use for school is J2SE, and for along time I was just using Notepad, but for the past year or so I've been using the wonder that is Eclipse . Basically, my question is this, where should I go next? All those acronmys I mentioned earlier, which are the most important to know when looking for a job? Is just knowing how to do programming in Java good enough? I'd like this to be a Java topic, not learn C++ or something, cause I already have experience with C/C++, PHP, VB, and more. Thanks in advance, and I hope this was the right board to post this in.
[ October 09, 2004: Message edited by: Billy Boob ]
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
Marshal

Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24187
    
  34

Hi Billy,

One thing you could do: check out our naming policy, which you may have missed on your way in. It requires that you use a full, real (sounding) first and last name for your display name. "Joke" names are explicitly verboten. You can change your display name here. Thanks!


[Jess in Action][AskingGoodQuestions]
Billy Bob
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 05, 2004
Posts: 14
Not to sound bad, but how do you know it's not my real name? It really is, but if you want I can change it to something different.
Nick George
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 04, 2004
Posts: 815
hee hee... boob


I've heard it takes forever to grow a woman from the ground
Billy Bob
Greenhorn

Joined: Feb 05, 2004
Posts: 14
haha it's so funny, whitepages.com returns 90 results for it, but im thinking most people, like me, don't have a name like this listed lol.
Srinivasa Raghavan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 1228
U can do a certification that's an added advantage in seeking a job.
Srini


Thanks & regards, Srini
MCP, SCJP-1.4, NCFM (Financial Markets), Oracle 9i - SQL ( 1Z0-007 ), ITIL Certified
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
Marshal

Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24187
    
  34

Originally posted by Billy Boob:
It really is, but if you want I can change it to something different.


If that's your real name, than I beg your pardon, and no, I don't want you to change it. I thought it was possible that your name was something along the lines of, oh, "Bradford Johnson," let's say. Just a guess.
Jeff Langr
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 14, 2003
Posts: 762
Learn how to use all those tools and acronyms well. I assist with hiring at many clients and see hundreds of resumes. They all look the same: J2EE this, JDBC that, certification, yadda yadda. Few of them stand out from the rest.

Any schmuck can figure out how to code and deploy an EJB. But what really works? Read books, articles, etc., and figure out for yourself, what best to do and what best not to do. Emphasize that you know how to best solve problems using all these lovely tools. Learn about what makes for a good OO design and what doesn't.

-j-


Books: Agile Java, Modern C++ Programming with TDD, Essential Java Style, Agile in a Flash. Contributor, Clean Code.
Rick Portugal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 17, 2002
Posts: 243
Originally posted by Billy Boob:
Not to sound bad, but how do you know it's not my real name? It really is, but if you want I can change it to something different.
Just don't try to tell us that you have a twin.

Think about what you want to specialize in. There are so many specialties within Java it is mind-boggling. J2EE and JSP are for Web development. If that sounds cool to you, learn that. Or maybe you'd like to specialize in building graphical interfaces with Swing.

Take a look at the list of forums here and decide what you think would be fun to learn.


IBM 286, SCJP, SCWCD, EIEIO
Mr. C Lamont Gilbert
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 05, 2001
Posts: 1170

well pure programming is going to the sweat shops. You'll need some related knowledge to best use your skills.

Myself, I am an electrical engineer, and use my software skills to solve problems and create tools for EE problems and situations.

You can do the same with J2EE, etc. So no, its definitely not enough to have pure programming experience. Join a few interesting open source projects and learn from some of the programmers there. That way you can gain experience in any particular field you may want.

Also consider where you want to work. Consider the major industries there. programming experience goes well as a chaser for other skills.

Of course as a CS you probably have software architecture skills and design too. I don't have much experience with that software path so I couldn't advise you much.
Vijesh Kukreja
Greenhorn

Joined: Oct 12, 2004
Posts: 1
Hello.If u know basic Java i.e if ur core java is very good that it's good.Technology is ever changing but basics remain basics.
Arnold Reuser
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 20, 2003
Posts: 196
First of all. I don't think this is not an advanced topic because you've taken tons of classes. But anyway : I agree with Jeff and I would like to add that I don't think there is a guide that really tells you what to do. Therefore the best advice I can give you is that you should just follow your heart. Because what you like to know, read about and study will change within every five years. When you would like to know more about those acronyms, read and study, when you feel you really don't care, don't. Because in the end it is all about having the right idea at the right time in the right place. And it isn't about knowing a lot of acronyms, tools or other new features invented by just another marketeer who wants to sell a product.
[ October 12, 2004: Message edited by: Arnold Reuser ]
 
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