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Rails vs. J2EE vs. M$ .NET

Michael (Mikey) Green
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 11, 2008
Posts: 6
As my first post on Java Ranch, I would like to introduce myself to the community. I am Mikey, a recent Electronics Graduate from a (reputable!) UK University, where I am currently residing, and am due to start my first job as a junior IT analyst in September.

I have a fair bit of experience in using Java (not J2EE), courtesty of lots of University based projects and have some other experience in random technologies. As I prepare to start my job in a few months time, I have been trying to keep myself busy by preparing for the SCJP. However, as I am sure most of gurus on the ranch know, there are some dominant competitors to Java(J2EE), including Rails (Ruby) and the M$ Java Clone - The .Net Platform. There are many others out there (python, peerl ) but the main reason I chose to concentrate on these is because I am a bit torn between these three technical platforms. The dilemma is this - I would like to start my job, "hitting the ground" running but I am not sure what technology would I really encounter, and what kind of work I might be doing.

My current reasoning is that it's good to be well versed in atleast one platform than be a Jack of All Trades, and accordingly I am concentrating on Java for now. Looking a few months in to the future, what do you guys think how Java (J2EE + Frameworks) is going to compare with Rails and M$ .NET as a technology?

And as a career advice for a 'greenhorn' like myself, what would you guys recommend in terms of choosing a platform? (I know it'd be blasphemious to talk anything bar Java, but I am sure you'd be able recognise this as a newbie mistake and pardon my ignorance!)

Thanks,

Mikey


What goes around, comes around - someone
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 19070
    
  40

My current reasoning is that it's good to be well versed in atleast one platform than be a Jack of All Trades, and accordingly I am concentrating on Java for now. Looking a few months in to the future, what do you guys think how Java (J2EE + Frameworks) is going to compare with Rails and M$ .NET as a technology?


What is wrong with both? Why can't you be well versed in one technology, yet be a "Jack of All Trades" for anything else? In fact, being a "Jack" first is actually a good idea. After all, how do you know if what you chosen as a career is best, if you don't have experience in everything?

Now, I am not suggesting you spent a lot of time working with everything. You can probably get a few months of a technology, by volunteering for projects. Heck, for someone like me, who has over a decade of Java experience, I didn't think twice about tackling a .NET project, a few years back. It was actually kinda fun...

Henry


Books: Java Threads, 3rd Edition, Jini in a Nutshell, and Java Gems (contributor)
Michael (Mikey) Green
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 11, 2008
Posts: 6
Wow! I didn't realise that quite a few of THE O'Reilly authors hang around here. It's my pleasure to have conversed with an author of your calibre (No, really ALL authors residing (bar tendering?) in this forum are awesome!)


What is wrong with both? Why can't you be well versed in one technology, yet be a "Jack of All Trades" for anything else? In fact, being a "Jack" first is actually a good idea. After all, how do you know if what you chosen as a career is best, if you don't have experience in everything?


That is exactly the reason why I am lingering towards Java for now, as that's probably the only language I know enough to write a crooked app!
(well, in our electronics courses, we did learn a lot of low-level C, with lots and lots of native assembly doing (shudder) low-level bit manipulation to 'satisfy' the needs of cheap PIC/FPGA hardware, but I doubt that I can write any imaginative creations at such low-level to be of sufficient use to anybody!). In any case, the point is this. Learning Java with all of it's little third party tweaks (YES frameworks are tweaks, no matter you say- they are there to correct the fundamendtal design flaws!) is getting harder by the day.

On the other hand, there is Ruby - what an invention that is! I am not an experienced programmer, but even I am falling in love with this little beauty! The trouble is my time is limited, and I can either invest it in trying to 'look' professional by following the crowd (learn Java) or take the bold step and join the revolution (convert to the Ruby camp!)

Ah! Why oh why is the corporate world hell-bent on using redundant (or nearing redundancy) when OSS is the only way to salvation - sorry, I went on a bit of a rant there!


...You can probably get a few months of a technology, by volunteering for projects...


Please, please, please suggest me some good newbie freindly Java/J2EE based projects where I can start contributing, and the build process isn't absolutely maniacal! I tried searching a lot on freshmeat.net and sourceforge for some good projects where I could learn more about Java, but I failed. One of these 'faiulres' included a project called GanttProject which I thought might be a good beginner level project - but boy was I wrong, after several hours of frantic struggle I gave up trying to run this Eclipse based Java project...

So once again, earnest request for suggestions for newbie friendly Java/J2EE projects.

Thanks,

Mikey
rajesh kh kumar
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 26, 2008
Posts: 3
Ruby on rails is much talked about these days, but i do not see any Ruby projects in my organization nor any organizations where my friends work have any project in Ruby,Rails
i am interested in learning Ruby but i am confused if there is no industry acceptance then there would be no benefit of learning it.
folks! please let me know your opinion.
Bobby Sharma
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 18, 2008
Posts: 574
    
    1

Hi rajesh,

Why ruby? why not C# .net or C++/CLI.

If you want to learn scripting or have fun with language,learn Python.

Python is highly readable ,robust and powerful object oriented language,python is highly used in Information Security field for writing
security tools.You can write virtual credit card,bank card or ATM card
easily in python as well as python is best language for writing worms.
(My friend have written virtual credit card in python ,I met him on
astalavista.net,Now my account has expired )

I gave you the suggestion based on my experience in getting advice from
many year experienced professionals who are working in top-notch companies
and doom cracking sites like atalavista.net.

In India,there are very few chances of success of Ruby until there are python,.net and perl like languages are digging the IT world.

best regards,
omi sharma
[ April 27, 2008: Message edited by: omi sharma ]

Back to Java , again.
Jesus Angeles
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2005
Posts: 2061
I suggest that you do at least 2 of them.

That is so that you have a back up.
Sandeep Awasthi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 23, 2003
Posts: 597
This question is asked lot of times by many people whenever they see some technology name they see more often at forums, on web , friends and at workplace. I feel if something new coming up, wait for industry to accept it. Even if some new technology come up, it does not come up in a day or two. And the old technology do not die in day or two too. You always get more than enough time to shift. I was working in powerbuilder long back. I still get openings for powerbuilder even though from long time I am not working in it. My suggestion is wait for industry to accept new technology. Think of future of your current technology. Decide whether you really need to shift. Because to learn new technology you will invest at least year or two to get good hold of it. In that time in your current technology you can go one level ahead. And if your current technology is going to survive atleast for next 5-8 years, you can postpone your decision to shift to another technology. May be in year or two you see some other name coming up.


Sandeep
Jesus Angeles
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2005
Posts: 2061
I have been hearing a lot about the advantages of Ruby/Ruby on Rails.

It is a good idea to get into one of the widely used technologies like .net or jee, and then study also RoR just in case it reaches critical mass.
 
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