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Should I migrate from development to Networking?

Bobby Sharma
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 18, 2008
Posts: 574
    
    1

I have been in confusion for one weeks that did I do wrong to choose MBA IT
rather than Masters in IT/Computer Science.
When I search for the job I find that employers require only Bachelors or
Masters Engineering Degree and there is no place for MBA graduate like me.

I chose management for some unfortunate reasons but I want to join development field so I do Java , even I did cert , and still preparing for advance certs.

Even if I passed All Java certs ,there is no place for me in Large and Multi
cast groups.

On the other hand ,If I migrate to networking ,there is good chances to join multi cast groups because they hire any graduates with good networking,system administration and communication skills But again,
there is problem, I don't like networking and hardware configuration.

I am just about to 24 yrs old and still unemployed.Many people who are younger than me work as a project manager and earning good package.

I thought several times to commit suicide(sorry to mention that) but did not
dare to do because I am such a loser.

my qualification is as follows : Bsc.IT(64%)>>MBA IT(62%)

With all due respect I ask you that Should I migrate to networking field?

One more question what's a combination of Java and SAP?
I asked because I see good job chances in SAP field too ,I will love to do SAP if there any combination with JAVA.


Back to Java , again.
Nicholas Jordan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 17, 2006
Posts: 1282
It doesn't sound to me like you should take drastic action right now. There are many persons who are in similar juxtaposition. I walked out of formal education after only 17 hours. If you want an overview, read "Rebel without a Crew" How a 23-Year-Old Filmmaker Robert Rodriguez with $7000 Became a Hollywood Player.

If you do not like networking then you really will not like what some people have to do to stay employed.

I had a friend that worked at a major international corporate citadel and held an MBA. I thought I was pretty good at picking the brain for reality based tidbits I could use. I found several ideas that were worth it but I need to warn you, critical remarks of established contemporary systems will get you nowhere. I have a mass-mailing firm hired, I do thousand piece mailings consisting of a very professionally worded 8� x 11 business letter with no gimmicks mailed to a thousand companies at a time.

If you think you got it tough now, go try to run a business.

With respect toward question: Should I migrate to networking field?, migrate toward a multi-discliplinary skill base. What this does is make you a candidate for multiple job openings. If prospective / candidate employer does not have the job you want, multiple skills is often extremely useful to attaing a job you can get. Build enough of these and you get true project management skills. I am an assistant to a person who is well over Project Manager, we both do extremely menial and trivial tasks that routinely are dismissed by others. It is not to be believed how totally useless it is for us to have someone dismiss some task as below their station.

If someone does that to us, they will find themselves being in some other team in a manner that makes them think they did the move themselves.
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3275
If your passion is in Java, here are my tips.

  • Don't get overly obsessed with certifications.
  • Prepare a resume that markets you as a well rounded individual with both technical & soft skills for an entry level position.
  • Get some hands on experience in sought-after technologies like Spring, Hibernate, etc through any voluntary work or self-taught projects.
  • Try and build up some network of Java professionals via career fair, friends, forums like this etc if you can.Even if it is a small company get some hands on experience.
  • Always the first job is the hardest, so you need to make job hunting your full-time job. There are some good books like "What color is your parachute? etc on job hunting strategies. Once you pass this initial hurdle then it should be a smoother ride.



  • All the best.


    500+ Java Interview Questions and Answers | Java job hunting know how & Java resumes
    Bobby Sharma
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008
    Posts: 574
        
        1

    Nickey : You explained me a million dollar fact of business.I read these
    kind of facts on books but did not bother to follow,Now I will follow
    your advice and suggestion with respect and honor.

    Arulk : You know many things about Indian market so you have enough knowledge which I can implement gladly.I will have to learn how to create a good resume and make my own J2EE application.By the way thanks for books' name.

    If I had American English accent ,I would have applied for international jobs as there is good value of certs over degree in UK/US.

    once again thanks for guidance.(Actually it was more than guidance)

    best regards
    omi

    [ April 15, 2008: Message edited by: omi sharma ]
    [ April 15, 2008: Message edited by: omi sharma ]
    arulk pillai
    Author
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: May 31, 2007
    Posts: 3275
    You know many things about Indian market so you have enough knowledge
    which I can implement gladly


    I am actually based in Australia.
    Kj Reddy
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 20, 2003
    Posts: 1704
    If you are from non computers background and want to enter in IT it may not so easy but there are ways. If you stick to just Java development or networking and it will become more difficult to get job. First you need to enter into a IT job and then focus on moving to the area which you like or interested. In fact I am also from non computer science background and waited for 1 year after my degree to get break in IT and started my first job as technical writer and then moved development. Just don't loose hopes and do your ground work, have some patience definitely you will get break. Try all ways to get job like apply as many companies as possible, ask your friends if they can refer you in their company etc., Still you get break you career may look blank but nothing to worry as long you trying your level best.
    Bobby Sharma
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008
    Posts: 574
        
        1

    Originally posted by arulk pillai:


    I am actually based in Australia.


    Oh! I see, but it seemed to me you are in Indian did not know you
    are an Australian.Either way you do know about Indian market because
    there is lot of company from America,Europe and even from Australia , most of them have same recruitment policy.
    [ April 15, 2008: Message edited by: omi sharma ]
    Bobby Sharma
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008
    Posts: 574
        
        1

    Thank you Mr. Reddy. I will do for sure what you suggested me.

    you all have similar solutions that have left no doubt in mind to follow.

    best regards
    omi
    Tim Holloway
    Saloon Keeper

    Joined: Jun 25, 2001
    Posts: 16305
        
      21

    I can't vouch for Australia, but you're actually quite well set up for the U.S. The fad right now here is that technical skills are relatively undervalued compared to business skills. In fact, the conceit is that technical stuff is something you ship overseas to the lowest bidder, but by aligning yourself with the business, you'll be less replaceable. At least until the next round of layoffs. Even CEO's are prone to short tenure in many corporations - I think the average quoted was 6 years.

    A lot of successful IT people started out on the business side, picked up computer skills to assist in the job and ended up moving over to the IT side. In the trade press, every so often I run across stories about them and about managers who swear that they prefer taking in business people and having them learn IT over IT people who don't know business.

    So all in all, I'd say there's little cause to be depressed.
    [ April 15, 2008: Message edited by: Tim Holloway ]

    Customer surveys are for companies who didn't pay proper attention to begin with.
    Bobby Sharma
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008
    Posts: 574
        
        1

    Yea Tim you are right, there is good chances for me in US as opposed to developing country like India,unfortunate to me I did not born in Metro.

    I already planned for appearing GMAT and do MBA from US/UK university but
    for that may be I need to take 2 or three experience because I have to
    do distance education as I have economical problem(They charge almost double
    fees if you are not native ,LOL)

    Well,I am already MBA in IT but I want to do another MBA in double stream:
    Marketing,International Business Management.

    if I will not do MBA ,then I will be doing Chartered accountancy and SAP.

    Am I thinking correct? please suggest me if I am wrong anywhere.

    best regards,
    omi
    Nicholas Jordan
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 1282
    Originally posted by omi sharma:
    Nickey : You explained me a million dollar fact of business.I read these
    kind of facts on books but did not bother to follow,Now I will follow
    your advice and suggestion with respect and honor.


    It is a dreadfully sparse road, {   } that is why they did not want you to know about it.
    arulk pillai
    Author
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: May 31, 2007
    Posts: 3275
    A lot of successful IT people started out on the business side, picked up computer skills to assist in the job and ended up moving over to the IT side. In the trade press, every so often I run across stories about them and about managers who swear that they prefer taking in business people and having them learn IT over IT people who don't know business.


    A very good point. Lot of technical people get too much bogged down to details without looking at the big picture. To be successful one needs to be a well rounded individual (i.e. technical + soft skills) as opposed to just being a techie. Details can be easily drilled down with bit of a research on the job once you know the core concpts (i.e. fundamentals) and the key areas (e.g. Transactional considerations, Performance cinsiderations, multi-threading considerations, best practices, design concepts etc).
    Tim Holloway
    Saloon Keeper

    Joined: Jun 25, 2001
    Posts: 16305
        
      21

    Originally posted by arulk pillai:


    A very good point. Lot of technical people get too much bogged down to details without looking at the big picture. To be successful one needs to be a well rounded individual (i.e. technical + soft skills) as opposed to just being a techie. Details can be easily drilled down with bit of a research on the job once you know the core concpts (i.e. fundamentals) and the key areas (e.g. Transactional considerations, Performance cinsiderations, multi-threading considerations, best practices, design concepts etc).


    Unfortunately, there's lot of people out there who are techies who don't do very well on performance, multi-threading - and expecially transaction management - and so forth.

    I could divert this thread on a long and detailed discussion on why a business that wants to get maximum benefit from its IT resources needs people who are tech-first and business-second (NOT tech-only!) as well as business-first and tech-second. But I'll leave that for some other time.
    Bobby Sharma
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008
    Posts: 574
        
        1

    Captain Tim , you guys should continue this thread about
    management>technical people vs technical>management people.
    This is just a request,however I have my answer.
    Nicholas Jordan
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 1282
    Originally posted by omi sharma:
    Captain Tim , you guys should continue this thread about
    management>technical people vs technical>management people.
    This is just a request,however I have my answer.


    Well I have been clamoring for that for a long time. The correct place to discuss that is in Questions, suggestions and whining about this site. , and I am sure they will notice this observation and note the matter for discussion.

    The problem with the thread of this topic ( as it is developing ) is that it gets into human nature and that most jobs that are of material interest ( our techie issue ) do not fit into socialization issues such as employment. Many blogs address such matters but I do not use them because they rely heavily on the scripting layer and where I work such loose typing is inconsistent with Real World Realities.

    Go look at Tim's site for an overview of one approach to programming. Try to contrast that with where you find yourself now and the advices you were given. Note that for Front Office Demeanor, loose typing and accomplished manner of dealing with people contrasts readily with bench prototyping and general shop practices and techie mindset.

    There is a JSR on Real Time Programming, it discusses the issue ( as this thread is developing ) in accomplished language and adroit expertise that only comes from 100,000+ hour workers.
    Bobby Sharma
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 18, 2008
    Posts: 574
        
        1

    Yes sir,Thanks for the information but I don't see any link of Tim's site.
    [ April 16, 2008: Message edited by: omi sharma ]
    Nicholas Jordan
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 17, 2006
    Posts: 1282
    Originally posted by omi sharma:
    Yes sir,Thanks for the information but I don't see any link of Tim's site.


    homepage.gif - second icon after "10:00 am," looks like a small house.

    Also, looks like arulk pillai has the simplified, plain language overview that you should keep in mind. One of the most famous workers in computer science died in total poverty. It is not like you are in any kind of unusual situation, justice and fairness are just a bunch of Meaningless Drivel

    Join us there for a little joking,.... post your woes as a facetious pretender and watch the Masters of Meaning slip inside your problem like a Ballet of Brutality. It will be funny no end and may make up for lost time that you lost. Note that moving from MBA in information science to a more technical approach is not even remotely hard compared to dealing with people who have no interest in computer science had you have continued the Master of Arts concept. While you are there - ( Meaningless Drivel ) - make it an absolute requirement that you read the Read more about "Meaningless Drivel" forum A document about fallacies for your reading pleasure. thinig at the top of the page. It is an absolute Master Work on exactly where you are at and what to do about it.

    Probably more important than reading Tim's webpage. Savor deep then read anything Simon Singh wrote.
    arulk pillai
    Author
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: May 31, 2007
    Posts: 3275
    Unfortunately, there's lot of people out there who are techies who don't do very well on performance, multi-threading - and expecially transaction management - and so forth.


    I noticed that too and that is why I emphasized that in my book under 14 key areas.
     
    I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
     
    subject: Should I migrate from development to Networking?