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I'm Deaf, should I work in Java?

Larry Dillions
Greenhorn

Joined: May 22, 2008
Posts: 18
Hello all,

This is my first post. I'm 31 and I come from London, England but am in Los Angeles at the moment. I have an I.T degree at Middlesex University about 4 years ago, I have worked as Quality Assurance Webmaster at BBC for 4 months and database assistant for 2 months. I have no job or computer preference. Over the years, I have not decide what job I would like to do. I know I have to study more before I get a job. I do not know which subject to study on. I have to pick one for the sake of my career, so I think that Java is the one.

I remember the bits of Java at University but I started reading the Head First Java last weekend and it was good book, a better than the one I had at Uni, How to program Java (deitel).

I'm thinking to study and get the sun cert. I hope to find work in Los Angeles, knowing I have to find a sponsor or get a work permit, something like that.

I wonder what is like to work at company with the Java things? Is it a lot of communication or less? How often in a meeting? what is the teamwork like? I use the chat messenger to communicate.

Thanks for your time
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11422
    
  16

legally speaking in the U.S., a company would have to make any reasonable accommodations for your deafness.

realistically, it's hard to say. they could easily say 'Oh, we just found another candidate who was better qualified', and it would be hard to prove them wrong.

I'm not saying you shouldn't go for it. I've been a developer for about 9 years. Much communication is done electronically these days. I do go to about 5 hours a week of team meetings, and I do talk to my team members frequently, but i also Instant Message and email - especially with people who are in other facilities from me - i probably routinely communicate with folks in 4-5 other locations, and we probably have 20ish offices/facilities.

There are several people in my office with some hearing loss, but they are both able to communicate orally - i don't think they are completly deaf, they just have some moderate loss.

Are you able to speak at all? Lip read? Sign? and would you be able/willing to learn/teach others some of these skill?

Many companies like diverse workplaces, and a good one would not even consider your disability (forgive the term) in their hiring decision. But, they may be hard to find.

these are just my random thoughts.


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
Larry Dillions
Greenhorn

Joined: May 22, 2008
Posts: 18
Yes, I can speak alright, orally, lipread and sign language. I understand what are you saying.

I'm willing to learn as quickly as possible but take my time and able to study everyday on per chapter or more. I'm on chapter one for today! Is it worthy to learn Java? Did you enjoy it?
Nicholas Jordan
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 17, 2006
Posts: 1282
My immediate observation on the matter is that Java is a Front-Line candidate for the language to use, and as for deaf or most any disablitiy, it is the ability to understand the issues involved - which you clearly do ....

I have several people I consider to be people I work with. All of the them are posters or moderators at Java Rach, I have not spoken but ten words with one of them and all the rest of the work is ( has been ) conducted by either discussion [ by posting ] or display of code. I have a mild industrial hearing loss, but for coding I would just as soon not hear much of what I expect some would tell me.

Java additionally has the strength that it is loaded with tools and libraries that I do not find in other languages. Learning in a structured environment may disprove that, but Java just seems to me to hold study tools like bait on a line. I suggest you give it at least a deep review as a candidate language.

As for employment,.. you're in there with the rest of us so probably read this forum in deep and detailed manner.
[ May 22, 2008: Message edited by: Nicholas Jordan ]

"The differential equations that describe dynamic interactions of power generators are similar to that of the gravitational interplay among celestial bodies, which is chaotic in nature."
Luke Kolin
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 04, 2002
Posts: 336
Originally posted by Larry Dillions :
I hope to find work in Los Angeles, knowing I have to find a sponsor or get a work permit, something like that.


Since the FY09 H-1B quota is filled up, any prospective employer (barring a non-profit or school) will not be eligible to file for an H-1B work permit for you until April 2009, to take effect on October 2009.

Luke
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30780
    
157

I don't think Java has more or less communication than the database/test side of the house. How many meetings you have and what style of communication is used is largely dependent on the company/team. We have one person in our department who is deaf. She lip-reads very well, so meetings aren't a problem. Also, two of our remote business users are deaf and one can't speak. They have an interpreter on the call. They use the translation phone (forgot the acronym.) And a number of people in the remote location learned how to sign.

There tends to be more communication the higher up you get. As the job changes from coding to analysis to lead (tech or project mgmt), the communication aspects of the job grow larger. I think this is true in any career though and you shouldn't pick what you want to do based on speculations about that.

I attend more than Fred's 5 hours of meetings a week, but not everyone on the team does.


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Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
To your question Java is no better or worse than C# for your needs. PHP, RoR and others might be more difficult. I say this because you'll have better luck finding jobs at larger companies which tend towards Java and C#. As Fred pointed out while no company can legally consider your deafness, realistically some may; smaller companies might find it an undue burden, while larger companies would not only have the resources for it but would like to have a diversified workforce and would readily welcome you (for the right or wrong reasons). I'd encourage you to look at large corporations, as well as colleges (which also are well equipped for people with alternate abilities) and if possible government IT offices.

My brother is an ASL interpreter in Chicago and I know there is a large deaf community there, it might be another location to consider.

--Mark
Larry Dillions
Greenhorn

Joined: May 22, 2008
Posts: 18
Originally posted by Luke Kolin:


Since the FY09 H-1B quota is filled up, any prospective employer (barring a non-profit or school) will not be eligible to file for an H-1B work permit for you until April 2009, to take effect on October 2009.

Luke


I'm disappointed with that! Then I have to bring my freelance work from London to LA if I find one from UK or find a volunteer work in LA to get some good work experience so I think I don't need a H-1B work permit for that. I hope to apply next year. Now is the time to learn and prepare for the job. Thank you for telling me this. Cheers
Larry Dillions
Greenhorn

Joined: May 22, 2008
Posts: 18
Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:
To your question Java is no better or worse than C# for your needs. PHP, RoR and others might be more difficult.

--Mark


Oh boy, do I need to learn another big programming language after Java?

I would like to do the SCJP then SCJD and SCMAD then SCEA, I hope to complete it all by March in 2009.
Luke Kolin
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 04, 2002
Posts: 336
Originally posted by Larry Dillions :
I'm disappointed with that! Then I have to bring my freelance work from London to LA if I find one from UK or find a volunteer work in LA to get some good work experience so I think I don't need a H-1B work permit for that.


On what basis will you be in the US? If you enter as a tourist you cannot do freelance work, and only stay 90 days at a time without any extension.

Cheers!

Luke
Larry Dillions
Greenhorn

Joined: May 22, 2008
Posts: 18
Originally posted by Luke Kolin:


On what basis will you be in the US? If you enter as a tourist you cannot do freelance work, and only stay 90 days at a time without any extension.

Cheers!

Luke


Yes as a tourist. I have a girlfriend who live in LA and she have a very important job in LA for the next 4 years. Sorry I have no choice to do the freelance work cos I need the British money to survive. I go home every 90 days for a month. If I can't get a work permit so then I cannot be force to marry her! Maybe in 2 years time. I don't know!

Cheers!
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Originally posted by Larry Dillions :

Oh boy, do I need to learn another big programming language after Java?


Focus on Java for now. If one day you have a need to learn another language you'll find it easy to pick up if you've learned the fundamentals of Java. Imagine having to learn Spanish if you already know French--and the languages are only a couple hundred words each.

--Mark
Kicky San
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 24, 2005
Posts: 18
I would like to do the SCJP then SCJD and SCMAD then SCEA, I hope to complete it all by March in 2009.


I would suggest you to go slowly and steadily. I am not saying that what you aspire is an impossible task, but then you will tend to lose concentration on the programming aspects, focussing totally towards the certification path.

I'm disappointed with that! Then I have to bring my freelance work from London to LA if I find one from UK or find a volunteer work in LA to get some good work experience so I think I don't need a H-1B work permit for that. I hope to apply next year. Now is the time to learn and prepare for the job.


Also please be informed that there might be a lottery if the total number of H1b applications exceed the allocated quota, which is happening for the second time in a row this year. You will have to get selected in the lottery to get the visa. This year over 150,000 applications (approximate) flew in for 65000 slots. So, keep your plan B ready too.
(I am not sure if they have any special quota for Brits as they have for Singaporeans and Chileans).


Good luck, You'll do it.
[ May 23, 2008: Message edited by: Kicky San ]

Cheers,<br />KicKy
Larry Dillions
Greenhorn

Joined: May 22, 2008
Posts: 18
Originally posted by Kicky San:


(I am not sure if they have any special quota for Brits as they have for Singaporeans and Chileans).

[ May 23, 2008: Message edited by: Kicky San ]


Of course, there is no special quota for Brits even the special relationship between USA and UK does not help. Never mind.

Thank you for advices and information.
Luke Kolin
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 04, 2002
Posts: 336
Originally posted by Larry Dillions :
Sorry I have no choice to do the freelance work cos I need the British money to survive. I go home every 90 days for a month.


This isn't a very sound long- (or even short-) term strategy.

Cheers!

Luke
 
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