wood burning stoves*
The moose likes Jobs Discussion and the fly likes higest paid IT job Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Careers » Jobs Discussion
Bookmark "higest paid IT job" Watch "higest paid IT job" New topic
Author

higest paid IT job

sumaraghavi ragha
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 17, 2006
Posts: 118
Hi all

Please let me know what is the highest paid IT JOB
Paul Sturrock
Bartender

Joined: Apr 14, 2004
Posts: 10336

This guy seems to be doing alright.


JavaRanch FAQ HowToAskQuestionsOnJavaRanch
Mark Spritzler
ranger
Sheriff

Joined: Feb 05, 2001
Posts: 17259
    
    6

Yeah, but I would point more to this guy as the highest paying, but well he doesn't have a job anymore though.

Mark


Perfect World Programming, LLC - Two Laptop Bag - Tube Organizer
How to Ask Questions the Smart Way FAQ
sumaraghavi ragha
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 17, 2006
Posts: 118
Hello.........


I guess my question is not clear.I am asking what is the highest paid job in IT market
e.g Javadeveloper,DBA,BA... SO on
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
Marshal

Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24187
    
  34

If this is a serious question (apparently it is) then it belongs in Job Discussion; I shall move it there for you.


[Jess in Action][AskingGoodQuestions]
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
CTOs are likely pretty highly paid in general, as are CIOs.

--Mark
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18988
    
  40

Founders and early employees can also be highly compensated. However, most of it is proably stock options, which requires the startup to actually succeed (sold or go public) before anyone sees any money.

Henry


Books: Java Threads, 3rd Edition, Jini in a Nutshell, and Java Gems (contributor)
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
author and cow tipper
Saloon Keeper

Joined: Aug 26, 2006
Posts: 4968
    
    1

I find Java architects seem to get paid the most and do the least amount of work. In jest a bit, but it does seem true.

Obvoiusly, management positions start getting good pay, and I know some people on the sales side of WebSphere with IBM that made more than any other salaried person I know, after their bonuses that is.

Of course, going on your own has great advantages too. If you want to be an independent consultant, you can often find $100 an hour jobs to just be on a team programming in Java. And since you're independent, you tax benefits would be equivalent to someone making 30-40% more in a taxable salary range.

-Cameron McKenzie
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3257
Google for IT JObs Salry Survey, But all depends pn individuals.


500+ Java Interview Questions and Answers | Java job hunting know how & Java resumes
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Originally posted by Henry Wong:
Founders and early employees can also be highly compensated. However, most of it is proably stock options, which requires the startup to actually succeed (sold or go public) before anyone sees any money.


Except at the beginning founders and early employees often are not paid at all, or are paid way under market rates, which is why they get those very early shares or options. Which can become worth millions if the company goes public, or can be worthless if the company craters.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61648
    
  67

Originally posted by Pat Farrell:
or can be worthless if the company craters.
Yeah, I'm still putting those flames out.


[Asking smart questions] [Bear's FrontMan] [About Bear] [Books by Bear]
Joe Harry
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2006
Posts: 9513
    
    2

This guy is looking for a figure that says or explains him the most highly paid IT skill.


SCJP 1.4, SCWCD 1.4 - Hints for you, Certified Scrum Master
Did a rm -R / to find out that I lost my entire Linux installation!
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18988
    
  40

Originally posted by Jothi Shankar Kumar Sankararaj:
This guy is looking for a figure that says or explains him the most highly paid IT skill.


I think that it is better to say that if you are good at what you do, you will be better paid. You can make the argument that job type X, on average, gets paid more than job type Y -- but a bad X'er will probably be paid less than a good Y'er.

So, assuming a DBA gets paid more, but if you can't stand tuning DBs or dealing with the type of clients that DBA deals with on a day to day basis, then being a DBA is silly. You will be bad. You will hate your job. And you will probably be paid below average.


In other words, if you like what you do, you will likely be good at what you do, and hopefully, you will be highly compensated for it.

Henry
[ July 25, 2008: Message edited by: Henry Wong ]
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Henry's right. This is a silly question.

There is no point in finding out what job pays the most if you don't like doing it. You won't do it well, and you won't spend the effort on it. So there is no chance you will be one of the highly paid folks.

Do what you love, to it well and do it all the time. You will make money.

You will never make a lot of money working for someone else. Employees don't make lots of money. Founders do.
Mohan Karthick
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 11, 2005
Posts: 199
If you own a company whom do you pay more? Being an owner of company your main aim is to get more profit with more business. Am I right?
Now who will accomplish this thing a Good Developer, Good Architect or Good Manager?
The person who brings in new business - Business Development Manager.
The person who deliver the project as per clients Satisfaction- Project Manager

Above two position as the highest paid. To give more justification PM is solely responsible for project delivery whether he is having a good developer or good architect it is his headache, some time he may fire up architect and hire a new one or groom senior developer to architect level.
Mohan Karthick
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 11, 2005
Posts: 199
So basically if you want to earn money be capable to deliver a project on your sole responsibility.
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Originally posted by Mohan Karthick:
If you own a company whom do you pay more? Being an owner of company your main aim is to get more profit with more business. Am I right?
Now who will accomplish this thing a Good Developer, Good Architect or Good Manager?
The person who brings in new business - Business Development Manager.
The person who deliver the project as per clients Satisfaction- Project Manager

Above two position as the highest paid. To give more justification PM is solely responsible for project delivery whether he is having a good developer or good architect it is his headache, some time he may fire up architect and hire a new one or groom senior developer to architect level.


The highest paid positions at most companies are in sales and the executive suite. I don't know PMs to be very highly paid relative to other roles in most companies.


--Mark
Henry Wong
author
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 28, 2004
Posts: 18988
    
  40

I once had an engineer that came to me looking for advice on how to deal with an account rep (sales). He really hated the person, thought the rep was a total lier, and was looking for ways to prove him wrong. The engineer was surprised with my response... which was...

Is the account rep on goal? If he is, then he's right and you are wrong -- and I don't care what the argument was about. If a sales rep is on target, he is god, and trying to prove him wrong is simply futile. On the other hand, ff a sales rep is not on target, then he is a goat, and is always wrong -- so don't let him pass the blame to you.

Henry
Pat Farrell
Rancher

Joined: Aug 11, 2007
Posts: 4659
    
    5

Sales is the key. The execs get paid big bucks, but a lot of what they do is sales. The sales reps bring in the business. As Henry says, when they are above goal, they walk on water.

I generally like seeing the sales reps driving really expensive cars. That means they brought in big contracts and the company has lots of sales.

A company with lots of sales and weak products is a ton more fun to work for than one with great products and no sales.
Jayadev Pulaparty
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 25, 2002
Posts: 662
I've seen the top level execs(Delivery Manager, Engagement Manager) making big bucks in the offshore model (handling the outsourced projects for their onsite clients). They are the ones who directly deal with the client and keep them happy. One pressing requirement that i noticed for that role is an MBA degree from reputed schools. I always wonder why they are very particular on that tag? I feel that if the person is shrewd enough, he can definitely handle any tricky situation that comes along.
Jesus Angeles
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2005
Posts: 2057
I noticed that banks and financial institutions like Citibank and Merrill Lynch, pay more. I would guess that the reason is the size of the company.
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Originally posted by Jayadev Pulaparty:
One pressing requirement that i noticed for that role is an MBA degree from reputed schools. I always wonder why they are very particular on that tag? I feel that if the person is shrewd enough, he can definitely handle any tricky situation that comes along.


You are right, but as I've noted before the role of the hiring manager isn't to find the best person, but to find the best person within a reasonable amount of cost/time. You don't need a CS degree to be a great software developer, but consider you have 100 resumes and 5 minutes to go through them. All have 2 years of experience in similar roles. 30 have no degree; 60 have a degree from some mid-tier university, and 10 have ivy league degrees. Which 5 candidates would you short list?

One of the values of a degree from a reputed school (and one of the few things most people cite as the value of an MBA) is that it signals something. A kid who never went to school may be just as smart as a kid who went to Princeton, but it's far less likely that the kid who went to Princeton is as dumb as the kid who couldn't get into college.

--Mark
Mark Herschberg
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 04, 2000
Posts: 6037
Originally posted by Jesus Angeles:
I noticed that banks and financial institutions like Citibank and Merrill Lynch, pay more. I would guess that the reason is the size of the company.


It has nothing to do with size. WalMmart, for example, is much bigger in size than many financial companies both by market cap and by number of employees

Rather it has to do with operating margins. By the nature of their business, financial institutions bring in a lot of money, e.g. getting 7% of a $1B M&A deal is $70M. That's a lot of money. 7% isn't a huge fee, but $1B is a huge transaction and the type you're unlikely to find outside of finance. See if you can find another industry where so few people move so much money.

There is inherently more revenue per capita than in most other industries. Consequently there when a top candidate is deciding between a financial firm and a non-financial firm, the former can out bid the latter. Even between two financial firms, in areas like M&A the different between hiring the #1 or 2 guy versus the #5 or 6 guy means the different between landing the $1B deal and not, so the company will pay very highly to make sure it gets the top people away from competitors driving up wages. In software it's much harder to tell if the #1 or 2 developer really had a much more sizable impact than the #5 or 6 developer.


This last point is critical to understanding compensation. The more directly your actions can be shown to boost revenue/profit the more claim you can lay to a piece of that money and the more upward pressure there is on wages for that role in that industry.

--Mark
Jesus Angeles
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2005
Posts: 2057
Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:


It has nothing to do with size. WalMmart, for example, is much bigger in size than many financial companies both by market cap and by number of employees

Rather it has to do with operating margins. By the nature of their business, financial institutions bring in a lot of money, e.g. getting 7% of a $1B M&A deal is $70M. That's a lot of money. 7% isn't a huge fee, but $1B is a huge transaction and the type you're unlikely to find outside of finance. See if you can find another industry where so few people move so much money.

There is inherently more revenue per capita than in most other industries. Consequently there when a top candidate is deciding between a financial firm and a non-financial firm, the former can out bid the latter. Even between two financial firms, in areas like M&A the different between hiring the #1 or 2 guy versus the #5 or 6 guy means the different between landing the $1B deal and not, so the company will pay very highly to make sure it gets the top people away from competitors driving up wages. In software it's much harder to tell if the #1 or 2 developer really had a much more sizable impact than the #5 or 6 developer.


This last point is critical to understanding compensation. The more directly your actions can be shown to boost revenue/profit the more claim you can lay to a piece of that money and the more upward pressure there is on wages for that role in that industry.

--Mark


Mo money. Mo stress.


(Mo = More)
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: higest paid IT job