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Shall I make investment for Java?

Gulsum Ramazanoglu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2008
Posts: 51
Hi people,
I am a newbie and I have a question in my mind... How can I see the future of Java, and so myself?
I am 42, worked mostly as system analyst-programmer on IBM-AS400(RPG400) platform.. For a very long time, more than 10 years I didnt work because of some other responsibilities, which today too I undertake.. I was such a pro that, for instance, a British company that wouldnt provide visa offered me to give me visa if I would work for them.. Also here in Turkey too I have been called by many companies(10 years ago!)...
Now I cant see my future, but I want to be ready for professional life back.. So I want to see how things are changing and with which pace.. To a degree I know how things goes here in Turkey, but I have no idea about the world at all (about IT business and Java). May I ask ;

. Do you see anybody working around at your location, in their 50s or 60s? Also does it find acceptance to work in those ages over there?

. Do you see that Java will see acceptance 10 years later as well as today? How things are changing for software professionals?

If you share your point of view, I will be very happy.. Thank you
Paul Clapham
Bartender

Joined: Oct 14, 2005
Posts: 18570
    
    8

I have been working as a systems analyst on the same platform for longer than you have. Do you see how IBM has supported RPG on that machine for 30 years now? And since the late 1990's, IBM has been promoting Java on the AS/400. So at least on that platform, Java has a secure future. But outside in the larger world, there are many thousands of Java applications in use today. Most of them aren't going to be thrown out in the near future. There's a saying "Java is the new Cobol". That is meant to be derogatory, but there are still millions of lines of Cobol being supported to this day, 50 years after the language was first introduced. I expect it will be the same for Java.

And I can say that the three people who from time to time program in Java at my company are all older than you are. However none of us program entirely in Java. It seems that people have to know many languages these days.
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal

Joined: Jan 10, 2002
Posts: 61221
    
  66

Originally posted by Gulsum Ramazanoglu:
Do you see anybody working around at your location, in their 50s or 60s?
I'm 50, and the business-tier architect I work with (I'm the presentation layer architect) is in his late 40's. I'm not going to say that we're the norm, but IT isn't a Logan's Run where developers are sent to Sanctuary when they reach a certain age.

Also does it find acceptance to work in those ages over there?
Age discrimination does exist. Anyone who tells you otherwise just hasn't experienced it yet.

Do you see that Java will see acceptance 10 years later as well as today?
I think Paul answered that well.


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Jeanne Boyarsky
internet detective
Marshal

Joined: May 26, 2003
Posts: 30537
    
150

Originally posted by Gulsum Ramazanoglu:
. Do you see anybody working around at your location, in their 50s or 60s?

Yes. Both employee and consultant.


.Also does it find acceptance to work in those ages over there?

I agree with Bear's comments. My father had a lot of time finding work (in QA) as he got older. And a friend's father (COBOL developer) had a similar problem. That said, we've only had one person come to interview that looked over 50. (He got hired for what it's worth.) So part of the reason behind age distributions in the workplace could be the distribution in the industry. Also, I think it's easier to keep a job as an "older" person than get a new one. Especially for someone at a lower level. (If you haven't worked in Java at all, you are likely competing with people who are younger.)


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Gulsum Ramazanoglu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2008
Posts: 51
Thank you all.. your words are really very valuable..
I want to ask one another question from totally another perspective;
I have had a love in my heart always about medicine, but c'est la vie.. I couldnt find an opportunity to have education on that field in younger ages.. IF I can find proper resource for that education, do you see that its feasible? I believe that you do what you love the best.. and while I worked in IT sector, medicine has always been what actually I loved.. When I was an IT pro, I was also reading medicine books (also in recent years I prepared myself for a relevant exam by studying Chemistry, Biology etc.)... that much I loved it.. Maybe its the reson why I can do what I do today too, for its about healthcare..
On the other hand, I am a logical person to see that life is long enough to put who you are, but short as well to be productive..... not just for yourself, but for the others.. my philosophy is so that I am not living just to feed myself, but others too.. as much as I can do... So I dont focus on just what I love, but more than that, what I produce... But you do best what you love... again we are coming back to the beginning point
I cant see which way is both addresses my and others needs... Which direction brings me to a more satisfactory and productive way for LONGER time... thats important as well... I plan to work to death... as much as I can do..

What is your point of view? I know that there are late comers in medicine world.. but is it feasible? Does it worth to spare that much resource, namely time, money, energy? Or is it more pragmatic for such a person with such a philosophy and experience like me, to go on in IT business? In which one I can work for longer time with more productivity?

Those are the question marks in my mind.... If you share whatever you think, I will be really very glad..
Thank you again
Gulsum Ramazanoglu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2008
Posts: 51
I wanted to add two points more; one that, I am not NOT loving IT business, but its not my love ... one another that, I am kind an Energizer Bunny .. you may think that to have medicine education may be heavy for this age, but in general I am perceived as in my late 20s or early 30s... I mean I have energy for both..... out of this point what do you think?
arulk pillai
Author
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 31, 2007
Posts: 3220
Why noyt apply your wealth of experience in more neutral areas like business analysis, project management, solution architecture, etc. You may have to revise your resume to highlight your strengths in domain knowledge, leadership, analytical skills, etc.


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