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Can an entire application be designed and implemented using Servlets

Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
hi
Can an entire application be designed and implemented using Servlets ( just like ASP or Cold Fusion)?
Frank Carver
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 07, 1999
Posts: 6920
Sure. And many have been.
Do you have a particular application in mind?


Read about me at frankcarver.me ~ Raspberry Alpha Omega ~ Frank's Punchbarrel Blog
Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
Frank
Thanks for explaining what E-commerce is all about. But I'm
still confused a little bit.
When you say Amazon, Barnes and Noble use servlets or server-
side programming. I have the following questions.
1> Does that servlet use classes,objects and methods like in
applets or GUI programming.?
2> Suppose I want to specialise in Server-side programming and
JDBC what all do i need to know. Do i need to know applet
programming with all classes, objects, methods, inner classes
etc.
3> What is the difference between an applet and a servlet.
Frank Carver
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 07, 1999
Posts: 6920
1) First things first; Forget about applets. I think you are a little confused by what is an applet, and what is just Java. An applet is just a way of using the power of Java in a browser, and it's a very small part of what Java is. All the Classes, Objects, and methods stuff, and all the useful APIs (java.lang, java.util, java.io, java.math, JDBC, servlets, RMI, Streams, Sockets, events, inner classes, serialization, Threads, etc. etc.) are part of Java, and available from any application, applet, servlet, JavaBean or whatever.
I've been using Java commercially for about four years now, and I've never needed to write an applet, but I have written hundreds of thousands of lines of Java.
I don't know ahat language (or languages) Amazon and B&N are written in, but they do do all their processing in the server. They don't use applets, but deliver computer-generated HTML to your browser for each page you request or button you click. This is what server-side programming is all about - accepting requests from, and delivering replies to, a client system.
2) If you wish to specialize in Java server-side programming, you will need to know all of Java except Applets, AWT and Swing (ie, the Graphical User Interface APIs), and it would be useful to be able to use those if you have to do a different bit of work sometimes.
3) An Applet is a class which extends java.applet.Applet. A servlet is a class which extends javax.servlet.Servlet (or one of its subclasses such as HttpServlet or GenericServlet). All the other classes in a system may be used by the applet and/or servlet, but they are not part of it. In a good design, an applet or servlet should be a vary small part of the overall system, acting just as an interface to the real "business logic".
Is this any clearer?
DSV
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 09, 2000
Posts: 5
thanks a lot it is all clear now.
Originally posted by Frank Carver:
1) First things first; Forget about applets. I think you are a little confused by what is an applet, and what is just Java. An applet is just a way of using the power of Java in a browser, and it's a very small part of what Java is. All the Classes, Objects, and methods stuff, and all the useful APIs (java.lang, java.util, java.io, java.math, JDBC, servlets, RMI, Streams, Sockets, events, inner classes, serialization, Threads, etc. etc.) are part of Java, and available from any application, applet, servlet, JavaBean or whatever.
I've been using Java commercially for about four years now, and I've never needed to write an applet, but I have written hundreds of thousands of lines of Java.
I don't know ahat language (or languages) Amazon and B&N are written in, but they do do all their processing in the server. They don't use applets, but deliver computer-generated HTML to your browser for each page you request or button you click. This is what server-side programming is all about - accepting requests from, and delivering replies to, a client system.
2) If you wish to specialize in Java server-side programming, you will need to know all of Java except Applets, AWT and Swing (ie, the Graphical User Interface APIs), and it would be useful to be able to use those if you have to do a different bit of work sometimes.
3) An Applet is a class which extends java.applet.Applet. A servlet is a class which extends javax.servlet.Servlet (or one of its subclasses such as HttpServlet or GenericServlet). All the other classes in a system may be used by the applet and/or servlet, but they are not part of it. In a good design, an applet or servlet should be a vary small part of the overall system, acting just as an interface to the real "business logic".
Is this any clearer?

 
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