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Do I need MSVC++?

 
ricky gonzalez
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Hi, I am trying to install Apache JServ and I was wondering if I need MSVC++? Would any ANSI C compiler work?
Thanks.
 
Anonymous
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You will need MSVC++, any ANSI C compiler will not be able to do the job as support of GUI based programming is not available.
Also application developed to make it web enabled , support of
MSVC++ is required.
 
ricky gonzalez
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Thank you so much. I think I'll have to use something other than Tomcat now. BTW, what is the difference between JServ and Tomcat?
 
Irene Fernandez
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Apache JServ 1.1.2 is the "servlet engine" used by a web server like Apache Web Server 1.3.11, for example, to execute servlets. Servlets and JSPs are written using 1)Sun's classes in JSWDK1.0.1 or 2)using Apache's classes in Tomcat.
Irene
[This message has been edited by Irene Fernandez (edited September 20, 2000).]
 
Irene Fernandez
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I have recently downloaded the Apache Web Server 1.3.11 and the Apache JServe 1.1.2. I have set these up and I am successfully executing the example and a servlet I have written. I did not use or need the MSVC++ compiler. Why would I want to compile the web server?
Thanks for your help.
Irene
[This message has been edited by Irene Fernandez (edited September 20, 2000).]
 
Frank Carver
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Just in case anyone reading this is unclear, Apache is a web server which supports file-serving, CGI, and so on, but not Java Servlets. To run Java Servlets you need a "Servlet Container" which either "plugs-in" to a standard web server (such as Apache), or works on its own (serving files as well as servlets).
The original "official" Servlet Container for Apache was JServ, but at the same time as JServ was being produced there were also several others developed, both commercial and open. Sun were impressed by the effort on JServ, and handed over development of the standard "reference" Servlet Container to the Apache Group.
The Apache Group, in turn, slowed down development of JServ in favour of the new container, known as Tomcat.
The situation at the moment is that Tomcat is the reference Servlet Container and defines the behaviour of the Servlet 2.2 and JSP 1.1 specifications. It will run either stand-alone or as a plug-in to Apache, and is recommended over JServ. Commercial Servlet Containers like JRun and ServletExec are also available both to plug in and to run stand-alone, and other open-source Servlet Containers are also available.
For anyone starting out with Servlets, and wishing to use them with minimum trouble and expense, I recommend installing one of the open-source Servlet Containers, and running it stand-alone without another web server. I Recommend either Tomcat ( http://jakarta.apache.org ) or Resin ( http://www.caucho.com ) as good quality, robust, and standards-compliant containers.
 
ricky gonzalez
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Thanks Frank for the clear explanation. So TomCat by itself is good enough for servlet testing, without JServ or even Apache?
Do I just place the class files of the servlets in the "local host 8080" directory under the directory "work"? How do I load one particular servlets over others?
 
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