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server side java ?

mark stone
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2001
Posts: 417
servlets and jsp are server side java ?
what constitutes server side java ?
Roy Ben Ami
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 13, 2002
Posts: 732
first, you have to understand the concept of clients and servers in programming.
to program clients (end users) u usually need to know awt or swing (gui stuff) or maybe applets etc. you need to know how will your clients connect to your server (either through an application youll give them, or thruogh the browser in the internet, or even an applet in a browser). there is a new trend also of using the java web start to distibute the clients applications.
for the server side, u need some tools to access the database u have at your computer. for that u need the JDBC connectivity to a database server.
if your clients are connecting through the internet using browsers u need to use servlets or jsp to show them html web pages they can surf with through your site.
also, u can use RMI and EJB for regular application that users can connect to from their own applications u give them.
a last option , would be for small servers to make everything yourself using regular sockets and to send the data yourself across the network.
to sum it up, server side java includes all the API u need to put on the server and allow multiple clients to connect to. that includes: JDBC, Servlets, JSP, RMI, EJB, IDL and corba.
i might have forgotten somthing but thats about it. notice u dont have to know all of the API, just the ones u want to work with.
mark stone
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2001
Posts: 417
and all the servlet, jsp etc programming would need the j2ee api ? right ?
i don't think that the standard jdk kit has api for programming servlets ? what about the web server itself ?
is there an equivalent that we had for web server hosting applet via the "appletviewer". so one could test one's applet without the need for a web server.
So when developing servlets do we have something that one can actually test the servlet without the need for an actual web server ? if there is one then it would be great as i have my only windows 95 box.
Roy Ben Ami
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 13, 2002
Posts: 732
1) actually, for the servlets and jsp u dont need the j2ee . u can download the jar files containing the classes to deal with servlets and jsp. in j2ee it just comes bundeled in. (almost everything in j2ee u can d/l yourself in seperate files, j2ee just makes it easier ).
2) sadly, u do need a simple web server at least to run servlets and jsp.
3) i have win 98 first edition (so almost like yours) and i d/l the tomcat web server. it comes with the servlets and jsp API so u dont have to d/l it seperatly.
here is the link
to d/l it. i hope it works with 95 also.
William Brogden
Author and all-around good cowpoke
Rancher

Joined: Mar 22, 2000
Posts: 12761
    
    5
The early releases of servlet development kits came with a "servletrunner" - essentially a very very simple web server.
Tomcat is very simple to set up - as long as the Java 1.2 or 1.3 SDK runs on your Windows system Tomcat should run too.
Bill
mark stone
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 18, 2001
Posts: 417
can you let me know which jar files are these and from where to download. and after downloading where do we install or rather copy it.
1) actually, for the servlets and jsp u dont need the j2ee . u can download the jar files containing the classes to deal with servlets and jsp. in j2ee it just comes bundeled in. (almost everything in j2ee u can d/l yourself in seperate files, j2ee just makes it easier ).
Ahmed Haboubi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 21, 2000
Posts: 36
Hi,
If you download Tomcat, you won't have any problems running your JSP files (assuming that your JDK is running fine). As far as running your servlets is concerned, you can just copy a file called 'servlet.jar' which will be available in ..\Tomcat-directory\lib\common and paste it in ..\JDK-directory\jre\lib\ext. You shouldn't have any problems.
Ahmed.
Mike Curwen
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 20, 2001
Posts: 3695

to *run* a servlet/jsp you don't copy anything to anywhere.

Tomcat has all the required files where it needs them.

To *compile* a servlet you would need servlet.jar in your CLASSPATH, also not requiring you to move anything anywhere.

<TOMCAT (or CATALINA)_HOME>/common/lib/servlet.jar

There it is. To run servlets, just use Tomcat as is. To compile servlets, make sure this jar file appears in your CLASSPATH, or if you use an IDE, use your IDE-specific way of 'including' this jar file.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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