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good editor

Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
I decided to not use my Java IDE (JBuilder) and used NotePad for the first exercise. I had a lot of spacing problems. What is the best editor that that will space correctly. I know that my Borland editor will tab with spaces but the cattle drive advised against using an IDE.
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paul wheaton
Trailboss

Joined: Dec 14, 1998
Posts: 20729
    ∞

A lot of people seem to like "TextPad" although I don't know where you get it. I hear it is free.
Another is "jEdit" - and editor written in Java.
I, and many Java professionals, use Visual SlickEdit - but it costs $300.

permaculture Wood Burning Stoves 2.0 - 4-DVD set
Angela Poynton
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 02, 2000
Posts: 3143
Go with textpad http://www.textpad.com


Pounding at a thick stone wall won't move it, sometimes, you need to step back to see the way around.
Allen Alchian
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 11, 2000
Posts: 83
Todd,
I use TextPad that Paul referred to. It is nice for several reasons, not the least being that you can compile and run your code from within TextPad. And TextPad also allows you to assign different colors to various types of code statements (green comments and strings, blue keywords, etc). Program output is captured in a window within TextPad, so you can scroll throught it if it is multiple lines long. Same goes for any error messages from the complier. TextPad, in my opinion, is almost as good as an IDE except it won't step through a progam one statement at a time. But for shareware and a $27 registration fee, it's one of the best deals around.
I also have JBuilder, but I only use TextPad for writing my programs while learning Java.
My advice: don't waste your time with NotePad.

Allen
Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
Thanks for the info. Sounds like I will get Textpad
Jo Ryall
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 18, 2000
Posts: 1
Hi,
This isn't really OT. I'm a developer with an asp background and am getting into Java for a variety of reasons. I've gone with Textpad but am also thinking about IDE's for JSP and servlet work. Anyone got any experience with JRun and/or Forte?
Jo
Rajesh George
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 14, 2000
Posts: 5
Try using edit+. Seems to be a good editor.
Angela Poynton
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 02, 2000
Posts: 3143
I also use textpad for JSPs and servlets ... you can download syntax defintion from www.textpad.com and so can have JSP and just about any other language syntax highlighted!
Liz Stanley
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 12, 2000
Posts: 16
WinEdit http://www.winedit.com works pretty well. It's simple but does color the keywords for you. This is the editor I have my students use. You can download a free eval version from the above URL, or purchase for less than $100.


toodles,<P>Liz
Arthur Lyman
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 30, 2000
Posts: 11
For the time being I am getting by with the DOS Edit that comes with Win 98, but I am open to suggestions for other editors.


Arthur E. Lyman<BR>a_lyman@hotmail.com
Jason Vincent
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 07, 2001
Posts: 1
I use Jext (Java text editor) it is entirely written in Java, and is freeware. It is also open source (for those that like to tinker)...
it can be found at www.sourceforge.net
you can also find J-Edit there, another good one...
David Junta
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 10, 2000
Posts: 86
Can you compile and run java programs from jEdit or do you have to go to a DOS-prompt?
Jan.14th...I found out you can indeed compile from jEdit by adding plugins but I don't think this works when you're taking command line arguments as in the beginning JavaRanch exercises. Compiling from jEdit doesn't pass any argument.
Also, TextPad is only free for an eval version. To purchase it is about $27.
[This message has been edited by David Junta (edited January 14, 2001).]
JC Cook
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 13, 2000
Posts: 32
I think TextPad is a versatile performer, and well worth its price of �16 (around $23 USD). I use it for a lot of editing, including java. You can use it for free until you like it too, although you'll have to put up from time to time with annoying pop-up reminders to purchase.
If anyone is using TextPad now, and would like some tips on using it in the java environment, send me an email and I'll send you back some notes I gave to some friends on the subject. I'd post them here, but they're collectively a little too large.
JC.
JC_Cook@Qwest.net
[This message has been edited by JC Cook (edited January 20, 2001).]
Pat Barrett
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 03, 2001
Posts: 63
I've been using both notepad and DOS editor. A mistake I initially made was not noticing that outlook was re-formatting my plain text code. Make sure your mail program doesn't do this!
A co-worker also pointed me towards a JAVA IDE called JCreator that works very nicely for my purposes.
Pat B.
Peter Gragert
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 16, 2001
Posts: 424
What is the point?
Do you want 'beautifying' of code?
Do you want to execute your code from the 'editor'?
Do you want some marvallous shortcuts?
Do you like using a mouse?
Do you like automatic wordcompletion?
Do want to have help on classes (structure content)?
etc. all of this helps in your decision.
The professional IDE's more or less do this for you, but a lot of money is involved.
So you look at freeware (Gnu licence) stuff?
Give xemacs a try together with a recent version of jde (and some other packages, described if you get the jde from the net)then you have a free IDE with lots of possibilities AND all
is customizable (though you need to know [or learn] lisp, if you really want to change things, normal customization is just clicking)
elixier with jrefactory is another nice choice.
Peter
Peter Gragert
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 16, 2001
Posts: 424
Here I got the 'Whitebord' development IDE: http://www.togethersoft.com/
Where all wishes of the "Styleguide" can be chosen in the editor furthermore UML is directly available (great!) and CVS too and... (I am not a working in or for that company! ;-) ).
(At least in the full version (which I may use for another 18 days).
It means ctrl-T and the layout is for 99% perfect,
the {
}
the ( ident ) and spaces around binary operators etc.
Only difficulty: you need enough RAM 128 MB at least.
Diana Ryan
Greenhorn

Joined: Jan 17, 2001
Posts: 12
I am new to Java, and for Java I like Kawa. (http://www.allaire.com/products/Kawa/index.cfm, or go to download.com).
It's really nice because I'm not interested in a JBuilder type tool that generates the code for me, but I also don't want to have to go out to a DOS window to compile. Using Kawa, I can hit F7 to compile, hit F4 to run, and see the results of each(errors / no errors / program output) in a little window at the bottom.
It has "pretty printing", or whatever you call the feature that color-codes, it doesn't do anything funky (ever use WinEdit, which places your cursor at the top of the block of stuff you pasted, only you normally expect it at the bottom?), and it lines up the braces for you (I like mine stacked, like the Style Guide here suggests). It has other nice features too, stuff I'm not really using yet.
This is my first post here, so "Hello, World!" Just thought I would try to contribute something helpful.
~ Diana
ryan burgdorfer
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 24, 2001
Posts: 219
I use SynEdit.
It's available for free at http://www.mkidesign.com
All the features you would expect from a professional-level editor, and more...
~Ryan


<UL TYPE=SQUARE><I><LI>Ryan Burgdorfer<BR><LI>Java Acolyte</I></UL>
eric moon
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 26, 2000
Posts: 133
I'm a fan of VisualSlickEdit. It's written in C, so it's really fast with my measly PII 300 and 192 MB. All the java-based editors feel slow when I really get going. JBuilder gets jerky when it's parsing, and forte is slow drawing menus. I also hate having to press code help is outrageous. You can pop up the entire javadoc on a method if you want. It also is the most intelligent with indenting--it's the only one that outdents a closing bracket. The only thing that confuses the indenter is an anonymous inner class. And it will beautify your code for you however you like. It's midrangey in price (about $250) but you could download free 30 day evals till you save up the $$. The coloring is really nice, separate colors for method names, and special categories you can set up yourself. (Although CodeWarrior wins that battle, by recognising and coloring external methods and objects differently from those in the JDK.)
Fortunately VSE the official editor where I start work next week, so I won't have to buy it.
HTH
e


<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>"Those who cast the votes decide nothing. Those who count the<BR>votes decide<BR>everything." <BR> -Joseph Stalin<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Brett Knapik
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 15, 2000
Posts: 255
I hate useing test pads, it doesn't put you in the mood to be programming (me anyway) while in an IDE I feel more confident about my work. I still don't use the tools provided with it like autocomplete and such but its easy to access methods and classes etc. I use jcreator for quick excercies and for bi time consumin programs I use forte internet edition.
jcreator - www.jcreator.com
forte - java.sun.com
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I wish there was a button on my monitor to turn up the intellegince.
Theres a button called 'brightness' but it doesn't work


"Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning."
soumya ravindranath
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 26, 2001
Posts: 300
Hi,

I have been using JPadpro for some time. It has options for converting tab action into spaces. It can be downloaded from www.modelworks.com. Though it is a trial based S/W, one can obtain the key by mailing to the support team.
JPadpro allows running of classes and debugging too.
soumya.
Arthur Lyman
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 30, 2000
Posts: 11
I started using TextPad following your recommendation. It is a big step up over my DOS EDIT with a bunch of batch files and two command sessions to facilitate compiling and running. I did have a problem getting the program to stop and ask for run time parameters as the Cattle Drive exercises require. I had to go to Tools, Preferences, Tools, Run Java Applications and check off the option 'Prompt for Parameters'. The first time I tried this it just wouldn't work, but I came back the next day, checked off the option again, and it started working. Go figure.
Originally posted by Allen Alchian:
Todd,
I use TextPad that Paul referred to. It is nice for several reasons, not the least being that you can compile and run your code from within TextPad. And TextPad also allows you to assign different colors to various types of code statements (green comments and strings, blue keywords, etc). Program output is captured in a window within TextPad, so you can scroll throught it if it is multiple lines long. Same goes for any error messages from the complier. TextPad, in my opinion, is almost as good as an IDE except it won't step through a progam one statement at a time. But for shareware and a $27 registration fee, it's one of the best deals around.
I also have JBuilder, but I only use TextPad for writing my programs while learning Java.
My advice: don't waste your time with NotePad.

Elisabeth Van
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 09, 2001
Posts: 42
I've been using EditPlus and have been very happy with that, though I haven't used any other editor other than Notepad (and hate it). You can download it at www.editplus.com. They ask that you pay $30 if you want to keep using it after 30 days, and I think it's worth the money. It's got a lot of neat features, like being able to compile and run your code within EditPlus (no having to go back and forth to the DOS prompt). Check it out!
David Junta
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 10, 2000
Posts: 86
I've tried a few--and had some problems with some of them--but really like JCreator. It's available at www.jcreator.com. They're planning an enterprise version for sale later, but the light version, perfectly suited for everything I've been doing, is free and a pleasure to use.
octavyn pittman
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 134
I know everyone is talking about text editors and not necessarily IDEs, but I like JavaSoft's Forte CE (Community Edition) so much I've got to make a plug for it. I've tried a few others, and if I am going to edit code, I always go into Forte first. I honestly never use the visual "builder" environment because of the obvious detriments to having a tool build code for you, but I really love the conveniences Forte offers--although there is an ever so slight learning curve when it comes to things such as mounting a jar file as a file system, or other things.
Best of all it is free!
-op
Chris Stehno
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2001
Posts: 180
I use NetBeans IDE (www.netbeans.org - Forte's father) and TextPad (www.textpad.com) for all of my Java work. NetBeans does it all.
------------------
Chris Stehno (Sun Certified Programmer for the Java 2 Platform)


- Chris Stehno, SCPJ
Adalberto Altamirano
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 8
:cool
I like JPadPro from www.modelworks.com
It has a functionality that you can compile and run your java program from the editor itself, so you don't need to go tho DOS prompt.

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henry wu
Greenhorn

Joined: Dec 01, 2000
Posts: 23
I love UltraEdit! I'm surprised no one uses it..
It supports many formats such as C/C++/Java/Perl/HTML/etc..
www.ultraedit.com
Stuart Goss
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 21, 2001
Posts: 169
Does nobody use the "vi" with color mode and source code identification (or what ever you call it)? You can compile and
execute while in there too ( :!javac foo.java ).
Oh well.
Stuart
Marilyn de Queiroz
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 22, 2000
Posts: 9053
    
  12
Originally posted by henry wu:
"I love UltraEdit! I'm surprised no one uses it.."

I use it. You can compile directly from this program also.


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"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, and today is a gift; that's why they call it the present." Eleanor Roosevelt
Stuart Goss
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 21, 2001
Posts: 169
I think I better take a look at Forte, I think I've got
some flying around at home on some CD's ...
Tell you more once I've tried it out
Brad Ford
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2001
Posts: 40
Surprised no-one has mentioned Emacs yet. It has quite a following because it does basically EVERYTHING. Amazing program but a bear to learn and set up. There's a how-to for setting it up for java at http://jde.sunsite.dk/.
I haven't set it up fully yet, but the default is really intuitive with the indenting and it also has syntax highlighting and brace matching. I've used it extensively with Tcl and html and even Oracle sql. Works great if you take the time to learn it. Easy to implement on Linux but you need cygwin for Windows and I haven't figured out how to set it up to run a dos window in the buffer.
Marcus Milligan
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 14, 2001
Posts: 6
Programmers File Editor - is a very good free product and can be used with with many languages. www.lancs.ac.uk/people/cpaap/pfe or go to www.download.com and search for pfe you will be glad you did .
Greg Nu
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 13, 2001
Posts: 1
I think Emacs is very, very well worth the effort to learn it. The java module allows you to jastify (tab) any amount of code with M-Shift-\ command. This is _invaluable_ for moving code Windows<->Unix as well as for cutting and pasting code.
Also check out Editplus.com -- $30 shareware, has good tabbing support.
Both Emacs and Editplus have code highlighting, but Emacs is the cadilac of the developers editors. And did I mention it is free?
Greg
Originally posted by Todd Isaacs:
What is the best editor that that will space correctly

jason adam
Chicken Farmer ()
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
One of my teachers swears by Emacs. I haven't tried it yet, but it seems like a good tool if you don't want to bother with IDE's but instead feel more comfortable with a good ol' editor.
Jason
Carol Murphy
village idiot
Bartender

Joined: Mar 15, 2001
Posts: 1199
Gee, I type all of my code in notepad and compile from the DOS window. What am I missing by not using any of these other programs?
Lance Finney
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 26, 2001
Posts: 133
Originally posted by Carol Murphy:
Gee, I type all of my code in notepad and compile from the DOS window. What am I missing by not using any of these other programs?

It depends what you're going for. With an advanced text editor like Textpad or Emacs, you get code colors, indentation, and/or code completion (when you type in "pri" it gives you the option of println without having to type it all). Depending on the editor, these are just a sampling of the features.
A step up are IDEs (Integrated Development Enviroment). Unlike editors, which require you to have installed the jdk independently, IDEs package the JDK with them, and give a lot of Java-specific details. VisualCafe, JBuilder, VisualAge, and Forte are the biggest players in this space, and all have the features of the editors plus more features like wizards to create GUIs, to add design patterns, and other funky stuff.
There's nothing in Java you couldn't do without these tools. Sometimes the tools help a lot, but sometimes they get in the way. If you want to be good at Java, it's probably good to be proficient at both the command line and in one or two good editors or IDEs.
Rowan Brownlee
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 07, 2000
Posts: 97
Very happy with bluej
http://www.bluej.org
Written by staff at Monash University to teach object programming in java. Text-centric (so you learn the language) and visual (in terms of modelling object relationships).
rowan
Pauline McNamara
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 19, 2001
Posts: 4012
    
    6
Originally posted by Rowan Brownlee:
Very happy with bluej
http://www.bluej.org
Written by staff at Monash University to teach object programming in java. Text-centric (so you learn the language) and visual (in terms of modelling object relationships).
rowan

Hmmm, has MacIntosh version and it's FREE! Might finally be tempted away from my plain old text editor...

Lance Finney
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 26, 2001
Posts: 133
Originally posted by Rowan Brownlee:
Very happy with bluej
http://www.bluej.org

One warning with BlueJ - it doesn't handle packages well (at least not in the version I tried). If you open up the classes in the suncertify.db package, it strips out all the package statements and accesses the classes in the default package.
This is ok for small work, like the Cattle Drive or to see how some classes work in UML, but it's not appropriate for large-scale development.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
subject: good editor