This week's book giveaway is in the OCMJEA forum.
We're giving away four copies of OCM Java EE 6 Enterprise Architect Exam Guide and have Paul Allen & Joseph Bambara on-line!
See this thread for details.
The moose likes Meaningless Drivel and the fly likes twist and shout Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login


Win a copy of OCM Java EE 6 Enterprise Architect Exam Guide this week in the OCMJEA forum!
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Other » Meaningless Drivel
Bookmark "twist and shout" Watch "twist and shout" New topic
Author

twist and shout

paul wheaton
Trailboss

Joined: Dec 14, 1998
Posts: 20545
    ∞

The "sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick" is said to be the toughest tongue twister in the English language.


permaculture Wood Burning Stoves 2.0 - 4-DVD set
Sameer Jamal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 16, 2001
Posts: 1870
easy one
"She saw a sea shell in the sea shore"
David O'Meara
Rancher

Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 13459

I'm not the pheasant plucker,
I'm the pheasant pluker's son.
I'm only plucking pheasants
till the pheasant plucker comes.
Don't get it wrong
(Candidate for removal? It's a fine line... )
Angela Poynton
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 02, 2000
Posts: 3143
Originally posted by Paul Wheaton:
The "sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick" is said to be the toughest tongue twister in the English language.

Well it certainly is when you have a lisp!


Pounding at a thick stone wall won't move it, sometimes, you need to step back to see the way around.
Dave Vick
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 10, 2001
Posts: 3244
oddly difficult:
toy boat
paul wheaton
Trailboss

Joined: Dec 14, 1998
Posts: 20545
    ∞

Originally posted by Dave Vick:
oddly difficult:
toy boat

Only if you're Candadian (does saying this make me a racist?)
Jason Menard
Sheriff

Joined: Nov 09, 2000
Posts: 6450
I slit a sheet, a sheet I slit
Upon a slitted sheet I sit
Dave Vick
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 10, 2001
Posts: 3244
Originally posted by Jason Menard:
I slit a sheet, a sheet I slit
Upon a slitted sheet I sit

In that case watch out for paper cuts
Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
There was a good one in spanish that involved the word "tarabintantinguliar", which just means "to build". Anyway, it translates to something like,
<PRE>
This house is not very well built
because he that built it
didn't know how to build it
Hopefully another builder comes
to build it better.
</PRE>
And in the original
<PRE>
Esta casa no es tan bien tarabintantinguliada
porque el que la tarabintantingulio
no la supo tarabintantinguliar
que venga otra tarabintantinguliadora
a tarabintantinguliarla mejor.
</PRE>
Cindy Glass
"The Hood"
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 29, 2000
Posts: 8521


"JavaRanch, where the deer and the Certified play" - David O'Meara
Michael Matola
whippersnapper
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 25, 2001
Posts: 1746
    
    2
Speaking of Spanish...
Two of the English tongue twisters so far have the added twist of making the speaker accidentally say a swear word if they get tongue-tied.
There's only one other language I know any tongue twisters in (Russian). And none of them that I know of try to trip you up and make you say a swear word (or anything else that others might find objectionable).
Are there any Spanish (or other language) tongue twisters that try to make you inadvertently say something others might find objectionable?
Marilyn de Queiroz
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 22, 2000
Posts: 9044
    
  10
I used to sing in Glee Club in high school. We did tongue twisters to warm up at the beginning of each class.

A big black bug bit a big black bear.

Eight great grey geese gazing gaily into Greece.

Some shun sunshine; do you shun sunshine?

Sister Suzy sewing shirts for shell-shocked soldiers.

Nine nimble noblemen nibling nuts.

Around the rough and ragged rock the rugged rascal ran.

She says she sells sea shells by the seashore and the shells she sells are seashells I'm sure.

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,
where's the peck of peppers Peter Piper picked?

Amidst the mists and coldest frosts,
With stoutest wrists and loudest boasts,
He thrusts his fists against the posts
and still insists he sees the ghosts.

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?
If a woodchuck could chuck all the wood he would chuck, then a woodchuck could chuck wood.

I'll have to think a little harder to remember the rest of them.


JavaBeginnersFaq
"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, and today is a gift; that's why they call it the present." Eleanor Roosevelt
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Rugged rubber baby buggy bumpers


"I'm not back." - Bill Harding, Twister
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Originally posted by Michael Matola:
There's only one other language I know any tongue twisters in (Russian). And none of them that I know of try to trip you up and make you say a swear word (or anything else that others might find objectionable).

Because in Russian if you want to say a swear word or anything that others might find objectionable, you do not need to find an excuse for it - you are just saying it.
Sameer Jamal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 16, 2001
Posts: 1870
Originally posted by Sameer Jamal:
easy one
"She saw a sea shell in the sea shore"

I was wrong It was
"She sells sea shells in sea shore"
Paul Stevens
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 17, 2001
Posts: 2823
Actually it is:
"She sells sea shells by the sea shore."
But we all know what you meant.
Michael Matola
whippersnapper
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 25, 2001
Posts: 1746
    
    2
Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
Because in Russian if you want to say a swear word or anything that others might find objectionable, you do not need to find an excuse for it - you are just saying it.

It's not about finding excuses. It's about taking pleasure in getting away with saying something otherwise taboo by disguising it as an accident or joke.
Surely at some point in studying English you've heard a Russian ask in English "Who is not here today?"
(Part of "who is" when said with a heavy Russian accent sounds close enough to a Russian obscenity to make people giggle or uncomfortable. Heck, I've seen a Russian government official walk up and down the aisle of a tour bus asking "who is not on the bus?" -- not with the intent of finding out who's missing.)
This one might be a stretch, but one of my teachers claimed that Brodsky used the place name "Hiroshima" in some poem of his (can't recall which off the top of my head) because it sounds close to a semi-vulgar Russian expression meaning "to hell with them" (yes I know the expression) -- and Brodsky isn't one who hesitates in swearing when he wants to.
Even more of a strecth -- it's not a vulgarity per se, but in the opening of Petersburg, Bely seems to take delight in having the narrator almost stumble into saying "all the buildings that line Nevsky Prospekt are whorehouses."
I was grocery shopping with a Russian once who was looking for a jar of mustard. Of course he wondered the aisles saying "I'm not finding the mustard" (which contains a euphemism for a swear word, and can roughly be translated as "I don't see a frickin' thing").
Anyhow, Russians *do* occasionally seem to do the kind of thing I'm talking about (ok, the examples are a bit forced).
I was just curious more generally if speakers of other languages do this sort of thing with tongue twisters, like in the English examples above.
[ April 17, 2002: Message edited by: Michael Matola ]
Nanhesru Ningyake
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 29, 2000
Posts: 452
Here's one in Kannada:
Tarikere kere yerimele muru kari kuri mari maytaittu
Translation: Three black sheeplets were grazing on the bund of the Tarikere lake.
(Sheeplets? Sorry. What do you call baby sheep?)
[ April 17, 2002: Message edited by: Nanhesru Ningyake ]

Pourquoi voulez-vous mon nom?
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Because in Russian if you want to say a swear word or anything that others might find objectionable, you do not need to find an excuse for it - you are just saying it.
F*&%ing Russians. :roll:
Sheeplets? Sorry. What do you call baby sheep?
Lambs. Wanna know what we call old lambs?
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
F*&%ing Russians. :roll:


OMG..
Ok, Jim. You will pay for it.
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Burk Hufnagel
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 01, 2001
Posts: 814
    
    3
try this: "a box of biscuits, a box of mixed biscuits, and a biscuit mixed"
or
"two tree-toads tied together tried to trot to Trenton-town twice"


SCJP, SCJD, SCEA 5 "Any sufficiently analyzed magic is indistinguishable from science!" Agatha Heterodyne (Girl Genius)
Michael Ernest
High Plains Drifter
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 25, 2000
Posts: 7292

How about 'quirky tough huffy Burk Hufnagel's bagelworks'?
Nanhesru Ningyake
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 29, 2000
Posts: 452
>Lambs.
Ofcourse! Now why didn't I think of that!
>Wanna know what we call old lambs?
Sheepish lambs?
Anonymous
Ranch Hand

Joined: Nov 22, 2008
Posts: 18944
Try this
Betty bought a bit of butter but the bit of butter was too bitter ... so betty bought a bit of better butter to make the bit of bitter butter better..
Smitha Prasad
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 02, 2002
Posts: 41
Imagine an imaginary menagerie manager imagining managing an imaginary menagerie.
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Originally posted by Michael Matola:
This one might be a stretch, but one of my teachers claimed that Brodsky used the place name "Hiroshima" in some poem of his (can't recall which off the top of my head) because it sounds close to a semi-vulgar Russian expression meaning "to hell with them" (yes I know the expression) -- and Brodsky isn't one who hesitates in swearing when he wants to.

Here is an interesting text about Brodsky's poem translation, he does use "Hiroshima" there, although it doesn't look similar to "semi-vulgar expression" to me.
Jim Baiter
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 05, 2001
Posts: 532
Just testing.
Michael Matola
whippersnapper
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 25, 2001
Posts: 1746
    
    2
Mapraputa Is:
Here is an interesting text about Brodsky's poem translation,

That's the poem I was thinking of! Well, you gave me something to read this weekend. My class notes on this poem are probably off in storage somewhere.
Glancing over this literary allusion scavenger hunt deconstruction cum problems-of-translation exercise makes me smile in a sort of "path not taken" kind of way -- I am, like, so glad I didn't go that route.

he does use "Hiroshima" there, although it doesn't look similar to "semi-vulgar expression" to me.

Teach's contention was that "Hiroshima" sounds close to "kher s nimi" (to hell with them).
[ April 23, 2002: Message edited by: Michael Matola ]
 
wood burning stoves
 
subject: twist and shout