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Your most hated word

Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
Mine is "normal"
Sameer Jamal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 16, 2001
Posts: 1870
heat
Pradip Bhat
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Joined: Jul 04, 2002
Posts: 149
Mine is tangent


Yeshwantpur
Rufus BugleWeed
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 22, 2002
Posts: 1551
anal-retentive
[ July 08, 2002: Message edited by: Rufus Bugleweed ]
Anthony Villanueva
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 1055
bug
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
paradigm


Associate Instructor - Hofstra University
Amazon Top 750 reviewer - Blog - Unresolved References - Book Review Blog
Jake the Snake
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Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 109
critical
Todd Sanders
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Joined: Jan 07, 2002
Posts: 33
WORD
Pranav Jaidka
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 14, 2000
Posts: 264
Monday
Dave Vick
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 10, 2001
Posts: 3244
orthogonal
Michael Ernest
High Plains Drifter
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 25, 2000
Posts: 7292

As in life, I keep many enemies in the lexicon. Among my most wanted list:
provisioning
imagineer
leverage
componentization
Adverbs are parasitic by nature, but some are downright vampiric, such as:

definitely
basically
effectively
Matthew Phillips
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 09, 2001
Posts: 2676
Fool


Matthew Phillips
Shura Balaganov
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 664
OK, mine is not a word, it is an expression: "nice guy". When I hear someone describe a person as "he's a nice guy", I know right there and now that he is talent-less, uneducated, short-minded (although probably hard working ) individual... in my space-time continuum short for another cute word "loser" (simply translated as "a person I want to have no business dealing with").
But then again, on very few occasions I am wrong about that... :roll:
Shura


Any posted remarks that may or may not seem offensive, intrusive or politically incorrect are not truly so.
RusUSA.com - Russian America today - Guide To Russia
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
I was surprised to se "orthogonal" in the list!
That's one I use to get a hint about the intelligence (or education really) of a young lady.
But I am not prejudiced... He he...
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Well, it's on Dave's list. :roll: On the other hand, when I saw that Map didn't like "normal", I figured that's because she would just use "orthogonal" instead. (OK, maybe not in all contexts, but some...)
I don't have a particular most hated word, but most trendy buzzwords would be candidates. (Michael's first four are good examples.) I just heard a co-worker make gratuitous use of "pro-active", so that's the first one that came to my mind just now (even though it may no longer qualify as "trendy").
By the way, I think Shura is a really nice guy.


"I'm not back." - Bill Harding, Twister
Mark Spritzler
ranger
Sheriff

Joined: Feb 05, 2001
Posts: 17249
    
    6

Any Buzzword you see in a J2EE product advertisement. Words like Robust, Rapid Development, Ease of Use. You know what I mean, all those phony promises they sell you.
Mark


Perfect World Programming, LLC - Two Laptop Bag - Tube Organizer
How to Ask Questions the Smart Way FAQ
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
How about the names used to describe Java in the beginning!?
The people from Sun were not even trying to hide it: They even called Java (I wished I still had the article, anyone?) a "buzzword-compliant" language:
Simple, Architecture neutral, Object oriented, Portable, Distributed, High performance, Interpreted, Multithreaded, Robust, Dynamic, Secure...
Dave Vick
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 10, 2001
Posts: 3244
Actually, I just used orthogonal to get under Maps skin But, I have yet to use it in a sentence myself - I'd probably get flayed alive here at work
My personal favorite:
orientated instead of oriented.
Then there is also:
a mute point vs moot point - I know some one that used to say that all of the time, she was a few fries short of a happy meal
Mapraputa Is
Leverager of our synergies
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
"Using SOAP for RPC is orthogonal to the SOAP protocol binding"
Don Box, et al. "SOAP: Simple Object Access Protocol"
"The question of whether to use a session ID or a Connection object for identification is mostly orthogonal to the question of whether to use a timeout or Unreferenced for cleanup..."
Peter den Haan, "Developer Certification" forum,
http://www.coderanch.com/t/180082/java-developer-SCJD/certification/Locking-Suggestions-Help

"Having a bad boss is orthogonal to the size of the company."
Mark Herschberg, "Jobs Discussion" forum,
http://www.coderanch.com/t/27350/Jobs/careers/Working-small-Organization
My favorite:
"One says that array types are orthogonal to the type system, which in mathematical terms means that for every type there is a corresponding array type"
Douglas Dunn. "Java Rules" p.474

[ July 08, 2002: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
I use orthogonal sometimes to describe that two things are independent of each other. ...From my old days in physics where the orthogonal vector product (versus scalar) of two orthogonal vectors (90 degrees) is zero.
Is that correct? I haven't checked it in a long time and at my age I may have forgotten!!
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
I thought orthogonal was the shape of a stop sign?
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
Hexagon?
Alex Ayzin
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 10, 2001
Posts: 107
How about "dude". Whenever I hear someone saying "hey, dude" with that special California's "Surf's Up-prononciation" I get uncontrolable urge to take this person to nearest Basic-english course and chain him there until he learns proper form of salutation/greetings.
P.S: I'm not some laid back 55 year old, I'm 29 from Brooklyn, just hate that word.
--Alex
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
" ...From my old days in physics where the orthogonal vector product (versus scalar) of two orthogonal vectors (90
degrees) is zero."


Oops! Serves me right for not refreshing my mind (just my stomach!)
If the VECTOR product is zero, doesn't that imply that the scalar product is also zero?
Oohh my mind hurts!
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
I thought orthogonal was the shape of a stop sign?
No, I'm pretty sure it has to do with the nature of being. Or maybe it had something to with the study of birds...

For vectors: the vector (cross) product of two orthogonal vectors is nonzero, while the scalar (dot) product is zero. For parallel vectors it's reversed.
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
Oh "god!" I had forgotten that the sine of 90 = 1 !!
That's a SIN, ha ha! No pun intended!
Shura Balaganov
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 664
Jim: you are a nice guy yourself
Alex: Dude, how's Brooklyn treating you? I am there every weekend at my girlfriend's place Parking there sucks big time...
If orthogonal points of view do not intersect, does it mean they are parallel?
One more:
"The line is busy..." (one day i am going to find out where did the line go and drag it out!)
Shura
Jason Menard
Sheriff

Joined: Nov 09, 2000
Posts: 6450
One usage of a word that never ceases to annoy me: axed instead of asked. As in, "I axed her if she would go out with me, but she said 'no way'." :roll:
[ July 09, 2002: Message edited by: Jason Menard ]
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
If orthogonal points of view do not intersect, does it mean they are parallel?
Who said they don't intersect? But even if they don't, that hardly implies they are parallel. It's certainly not true for lines anyway.
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Oh "god!" I had forgotten that the sine of 90 = 1 !!
Don't be silly. The sine of 90 is approximately 0.894. However, the sine of 90° is 1.
That's a SIN, ha ha! No pun intended!
Ummm... I find it hard to believe that wasn't intentional.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
Who said they don't intersect? But even if they don't, that hardly implies they are parallel. It's certainly not true for lines anyway.
If two lines don't intersect then don't they have to be parallel in Euclidean geometry?
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Not unless you're thinking of a restricted subset of Euclidean geometry.
Anthony Villanueva
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 1055

If two lines don't intersect then don't they have to be parallel in Euclidean geometry?

Hm. This thread seems to be getting, uh, orthogonal to the original topic but, anyway,
what Jim is saying is that [deleted by heavy-handed management].
[ July 09, 2002: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Hey, let's not make it too easy for them.
Anthony Villanueva
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 1055
dude I got axed! Jim you're not a nice guy
Shura Balaganov
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 664
Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
Not unless you're thinking of a restricted subset of Euclidean geometry.

Aha, Euclidean 2-dimentional geometry. So you are saying that most points of view are at least 3D?
Shura
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
So you are saying that most points of view are at least 3D?
Well, I don't know if they are, but I believe they should be.
Anthony Villanueva
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 22, 2002
Posts: 1055
Yeah. Three cheers for lateral thinking
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
See, it didn't occur to me that this was lateral thinking. I mean, it's just the third dimension. I live there; I see it every day. Maybe those Russian mathematicians haven't discovered it yet though.
[running away quickly...]
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Of course, this calls for a Simpsons quote:

<dl>
<dt>Lisa</dt><dd>Well, where's my Dad?</dd>
<dt>Frink</dt><dd>Well, it should be obvious to even the most dim-witted individual who holds an advanced degree in hyperbolic topology, n'hey, that Homer Simpson has stumbled into...[the lights go off] the third dimension.</dd>
<dt>Lisa</dt><dd>[turning the lights back on] Sorry.</dd>
<dt>Frink</dt><dd>[drawing on a blackboard] Here is an ordinary square --</dd>
<dt>Wiggum</dt><dd>Whoa, whoa -- slow down, egghead!</dd>
<dt>Frink</dt><dd>-- but suppose we extend the square beyond the two dimensions of our universe, along the hypothetical "Z" axis, there.</dd>
<dt>Everyone</dt><dd>[gasps]</dd>
<dt>Frink</dt><dd>This forms a three-dimensional object known as a "cube", or a "Frinkahedron" in honor of its discoverer, n'hey, n'hey.</dd>
<dt>Homer</dt><dd>[disembodied] Help me! Are you helping me, or are you going on and on?</dd>
<dt>Frink</dt><dd>Oh, right. And, of course, within, we find the doomed individual.</dd>
</dl>


[ July 10, 2002: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
 
subject: Your most hated word
 
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