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Yamaha receiver & speaker

Balaji Loganathan
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Joined: Jul 13, 2001
Posts: 3150
Does anyone have experience with Yamaha Receiver and Speakers
Escp the model "Yamaha HTIB 102 Set Titan RX-V 430 Titan & NS-P 220 Silver"
Regards


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Rufus BugleWeed
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Joined: Feb 22, 2002
Posts: 1551
I have a yamaha receiver and CD. My brother, the stereo buff, said it was bottom of the line for sound quality. I'd say it was three years old.
The problem with it is that's it's got a mechanical function selector switch. That's the switch that changes the output from CD to tuner
to phono. In the beginning it worked great. But dust and dirt has collected on the terminals of that switch. Think inside the box.
Well, when I switch from CD to Tuner. Switching cound be via remote control or the knob on the front of the machine. The output sound gets crackily. To fix it, I have to walk over to the unit and fiddle with the selector knob to get good connections and good sound.
A small annoyance, but irritating when I'm leaned back in the recliner, nice and comfortable.
Maybe they have changed technology now and use solid state relays. Hence this problem would be history.
I'm not crazy about the placement of the functions on the remote control either. Preset up and preset down for the tuner are in the middle of the field. On the corners are functions never used. In the dark, it's hard to remember where the change station button is.
Just my 2 cents.
Balaji Loganathan
author and deputy
Bartender

Joined: Jul 13, 2001
Posts: 3150
Hi Rufus,
Thanks for ur reply.,Its really worth more than 2 cents !
Regards
Balaji
Shura Balaganov
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Joined: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 664
Most of electronics products I've seen from Yamaha were bottom-to-middle of the line. I've got PianoCraft Mini HiFi CD/Tuner/Receiver combination. Sound quality is good, not great. Bose or Nakamichi will beat it hands down, but you get what you pay for...
I worked with a guy who drove Ford Taurus SHO, which was joint project of Ford and Yamaha, and had Yamaha super-charged engine in it. The guy had all Ford emblems on the car replaced with Yamaha's, very strange looking hybrid. :roll:
Shura
[ July 10, 2002: Message edited by: Shura Balaganov ]

Any posted remarks that may or may not seem offensive, intrusive or politically incorrect are not truly so.
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Tony Alicea
Desperado
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Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
Rufus:
"My brother, the stereo buff, said it was bottom of the line for sound quality."
I'm curious to ask what your brother thinks on the following because I was an audio buff in the mid 70s when I got my first job out of college and could afford to spend a large sum of cash on audio equipment for the first time.
Even so I couldn't afford what was supposed to be the best audio equipment by many: McIntosh. They still look good. No transistors used then, only vacuum tubes which they said, and many believed, sounded better than transistor amps. I notice that they still make vacuum tube amps and preamps.
I am afraid (and you should be too!) of asking today "how much?"
However, my integrated (that means amp and preamp in the same box) audio gear was one of the last Marantz made in the USA. It proudly stated in the back and I still can remember exactly: "Precision crafted in the USA".
American Marantz was considered an excellent audio machinery in those days.
A few months later the American firm Marantz sold out to the japanese firm Sony/Superscope and from then on all Marantz equipment was made in Japan.
Mine was a transistor model BTW. They had made tube types before that.
Shura Balaganov
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 664
Speaking of which, there's a small company here in NE US that makes these tube amps and receivers. They look like a black box with huge tube lamps on top of it, and cost 10-15 thousand dollars a pop. A guy who works there says they have a company benefit that you get one amp for yourself (I think after an x years of service).
I own a Fender vacuum tube guitar amp, it says in BIG RED letters on each tube "Made in Russia"
Shura
[ July 10, 2002: Message edited by: Shura Balaganov ]
Tony Alicea
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Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
Fender tube amps!? OMG!!
Now you struck a nerve!
Those were my favorites in the 1960s when I was playing lead guitar in a rock band as a teenager.
What is your amp? A Super Reverb? A Pro Reverb? A Showman or Dual Showman?
I used a Super Reverb but my favorite was the Dual Showman.
You can hear how it sounded in late 1965.
Shura Balaganov
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 22, 2002
Posts: 664
Dude, I dunno, you tell me. Here's a link to it.
I spent good portion of my time in college playing lead guitar in rock band too, in early 90th, and it was in Russia. We either didn't have or couldn't afford all this nice gear that you guys have in US. So we used old "polka", or self-made gear. When I came over, I bought this one 'cause I kinda knew it was good for home, but haven't heard much else. Now it, and my Ibanez RG are collecting dust in a corner of my room, and any kid on the block is playing better that I... :roll:
Nice sound, very similar to my amp. My 3-4 home-made albums are getting old'n'rusty on tapes... Any special moments from rock past?
Shura
[ July 10, 2002: Message edited by: Shura Balaganov ]
Tony Alicea
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Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
Wow! Thanks for the link.
That was too an underpowered instrument amp for us to use in 1966. Although I'm sure that the sound quality was as good as it gets for a 15 watt amp. The speaker size (12") was more than appropriate and I imagine the amp sounds great at low volume.
That wouldn't matter now because as you probably know they amplify everything in concerts nowadays, as opposed to in the old days.
Then, if you wanted to play in a huge place, you'd better have a LOUD amp. Like Jimi Hendrix and The Who with their Marshall amps in the 1960s.
Since you asked, and you mentioned that nowadays there are kids playing all around, it was not like that at all in the old days. There were barely any kids that knew how to play in the neighborhoods because the fad was so new. And BTW, it turned out NOT to be a fad.
So if for some reason you'd learn to play decently, you would most surely end up playing in one of the few local bands, which is what happened to me. I had the advantage that I knew musical theory. And in fact the other guys that I met, most of them had had piano lessons or the like before they decided to play the music that the British Invasion brought to America.
Now those same old friends tell me that "you can kick a garbage can anywhere in this city and hundreds of guitarists pop out".
Rufus BugleWeed
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 22, 2002
Posts: 1551
Oh! I said that wrong. Yamaha is the minimum quality my brother finds acceptable. He likes those tube machines too. He tried to steer me toward one made in the UK. I forget the maker. It did not have a remote. I could not handle no remote.
My brother turns his nose up at stuff you'll find at the local electronics super center.
Tony Alicea
Desperado
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 3222
    
    5
"Any special moments from rock past? "
OMG, where should I begin!?
In 1966 after recording just one more or less good (not terrible) album that didn't sell because of lack of distribution (the producer was arrested for theft), we were the youngest band, actually the FIRST band from San Juan (Puerto Rico) to be asked to play in the US Virgin Island of St. Thomas.
St. Thomas at that time was the "mecca" of musicians of all of the caribbean. Like the Beatles' Hamburg.
Playing there was considered an honor.
The Mamas and the Papas had made a second home of it.
Duffy's was THE place.
Imagine when he came to Puerto Rico (PR) looking for a band to play one or two weeks during the slow summer months...
He listened to the other bands in PR which were in their early twenties. We were 16 (the oldest, me) and the youngest was 14 (the bass player).
He chose us because he couldn't believe that five little children like us could sound so good. And that it would be more entertaining and interesting to the audience to see this in his night club. In the HIP, ADULT world that DUffy's was (as we quickly found out after the playing the first song!).
There were the legal problems that in those days were resolved with money. We were technically too young to play in an adult club.
Money *did* solve that problem. But it wasn't our problem. We were too young. We just found out later. We were just extra-excited to be playing there!
One night Sidney Poitier came in and we dedicated one song "Lillies of the Field".
We were playing the "top-40" songs, BTW. That meant a lot of Beatles of course. When the songs were new.
We grew up at the speed of light in those two weeks! They liked us so much that we were asked back in the summers of 1968 and 1969.
I would like to die there!
 
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