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Best Java Design Patterns Book

 
tanu dua
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I want to brush up and learn the Java Design Patterns , may I have some input of Ranchains to pick the best Java Design patterns book.

Thanks in advance
 
Richard Green
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Core J2EE Design Patterns -> http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0130648841/104-2212963-5828715?v=glance&n=283155
 
Christophe Verré
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Does this book talk about general design patterns ? (not J2EE related ones)

tanu, your question is a bit confusing, because there's no Java design patterns. There are softare related design patterns (Head First Design Patterns, with examples in Java). There are also J2EE development related patterns (the book Lynette is referring to)... Please explain what you are looking for.
[ July 13, 2006: Message edited by: Satou kurinosuke ]
 
tanu dua
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Ok , to be more clear , I want design pattern book that is little bit oriented to Java /J2EE
 
tanu dua
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Ok , to be more clear , I want design pattern book that is little bit oriented to Java /J2EE
 
Stan James
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Bruce Eckell's Thinking in Patterns covers the GoF patterns in Java. I didn't think he added as much to the field as he usually does ... it seemed to kind of spit out the same ideas as GoF with Java examples.

For grins, see Grady Booch's Patterns Catalog.

I tend to think in principles much more than patterns these days. Patterns which represent solutions to a finite set of problems. If you happen to have a problem that is not one of those, you're on your own. Then you need to work with the principles that led to designs good enough to become patterns, and hope they'll make your one-off solution to your unique problem just as good.

For that, I recommend Robert Martin's Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns and Practices. This book really teaches how to design and how to code in a great way. If you're seriously interested in growth (and not just passing a Patterns interview or test) buy it now!
[ July 14, 2006: Message edited by: Stan James ]
 
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