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What is equivalent of 'O' level in INDIA

Anonymous
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hi can anyone tell tell me whatz equivalent of 'O' level(british) in India is it 10th standard??
Arjun Shastry
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What is this 'O' level in Britain?If 'O' level means student is min. 15 years of age and studying Science/Maths/Social science/languages and will enter the college next year after passing the exam conducted by State government then yes, O level means 10 th standard.


MH
SJ Adnams
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'O' level is the exam you take when you are 16yrs that enables you to study for the next 2 years (i.e. 16-18yrs). At 18yrs you go to university.

So whatever that is in India..
Paul Stevens
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I saw the 'O' level on Office Space.
Cindy Glass
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What is this 'O' level in Britain?
Owl Level . Generally required if you want to continue in Wizarding School.


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John Lee
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Originally posted by Simon Lee:
'O' level is the exam you take when you are 16yrs that enables you to study for the next 2 years (i.e. 16-18yrs). At 18yrs you go to university.

So whatever that is in India..

sounds like high school entrance exam...
Mark Fletcher
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IIRC 'O' Levels were phased out in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.
In England, Wales and Northern Ireland it has been replaced with GCSE's
In Scotland it has been replaced with "Standard Grade" exams
Both sets of exams are pre-requisites for going on to sit further exams ('A' Levels in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, "Higher Grade" exams in Scotland) which you need if you want to go to University.
As for differences, Standard Grades and GCSE's are equivalent in terms of difficulty, 'A' Levels and Highers differ in that 'A' Levels go into a lot more depth ('A' Level course is a two year course, 'Higher' is just one) and 'A' Levels are considered more difficult.
Hope that helps,
Mark


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Angela Poynton
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Yep what Mark said sounds about right, although I wasn't aware of the equivilency difference between an "A"(Advanced) level and a Scottish Higher, I always thought they were equivilent but it sounds like a Scottish Higher is more like an "AS" Level which is the exam taken now by most 17 years old in the year between their GCSE's and "A"levels.
Bear in mind in the UK we leave secondary(high) school at 16, and it is then a choice whether or not to go on to a further education college (or what we call the sixth form, if a school has one) to complete "AS" and "A" levels.
The education system is so confusing in this country though. Some schools still do 11+ exams, we're testing 7 year olds now and I think this is bloody insane. We're going to have generations of kids who are burned out from the stress of exams by the time they're 13 at this rate.
I watched my neighbour's 7 year old refuse to go out and play with his friends on Sunday because he was staying in to revise for his S.A.T.s that should NOT be happening.


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SJ Adnams
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I watched my neighbour's 7 year old refuse to go out and play with his friends on Sunday because he was staying in to revise for his S.A.T.s that should NOT be happening.

Sounds like a smart kid to me?
Mark Fletcher
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Simon,
Apart from evaluating the effectiveness of the teacher what possible benefit can be gained from seven year olds sitting exams?
When I was seven Im pretty sure that I was more focused on hoping Santa would bring me an Atari 2600 for Christmas and playing with Star Wars figures when I got home.
At that time I didnt really give a rats ass about my future education and career.
Do you honestly think any employer or university is going to care about what grades you got as a seven year old?
Arjun Shastry
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So which country offers good education until 10th or O level?I heard Finland has a good record
Mark Fletcher
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Originally posted by Angela Poynton:
Yep what Mark said sounds about right, although I wasn't aware of the equivilency difference between an "A"(Advanced) level and a Scottish Higher, I always thought they were equivilent but it sounds like a Scottish Higher is more like an "AS" Level which is the exam taken now by most 17 years old in the year between their GCSE's and "A"levels.

Angela,
Scottish students can choose to continue their studies in a particular subject beyond highers by taking a "6th Year Studies" course. However the combination of Higher and 6th Year study is still considered slightly less than an equivalent A level.
This difference in education systems also has an impact at higher education as well.
For example, undergraduate university courses in Scotland run for four years rather than three as is the norm in England. This is because you only need to get Highers (1 year course) to enter a Scottish university. As a result Scottish students often enter University at a younger age than their English counterparts.
However because the A level courses overlap with some of the material covered in 1st year Scottish University courses, a number of English students choose to enter a Scottish University in the second year of the undergraduate course. At the end of the day the material covered in an undergraduate course in Scotland will be the same as that in England.
I remember that I was still 16 when I completed my first batch of Highers, and was eligible to start Uni then. Thankfully I didnt.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Are you ssaying that if you don;t apss your "O" levels you can't continue to go to school? We don;t have anything like that in the US. Everyone goes to school until they are 18 (unless they drop out).


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Mark Fletcher
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Thomas,
Im not sure of the English system in this case, but in the Scottish case it works as follows.
Standard Grades are graded from a scale of 1 - 7, 1 being top marks, 7 being complete fail. To qualify for a Highers, you need to be in bands 1 -2, although you can often slip in with just a 3.
Anything less than a three, and the school wont let you set a Higher grade immediately after sitting the Standard grade. At least that was the case when I was at school. Instead you would have to sit some modules (called Scotvec modules, not worth the paper theyre written on IMO) to gain enough credit to sit the Higher course the following year.
Generally you'll find that the majority of people who score less than 3's across all their exams leave at the age of 16 anyway, and have no interest in going on to get highers or go to University.
Mark
[ May 21, 2003: Message edited by: Mark Fletcher ]
SJ Adnams
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I remember doing an scholarship paper when I was 11. At 7 (thats infants->juniors?) I had to do a load of dyslexia or something tests. I remember the teachers always used to give us 'reading comprehension' tests.
I know nothing about SATs, are they exams that decide the fate of the pupil, or the teacher? I'm guessing it's the latter.
I rate a 7 yr old as pretty smart. Certainly they will have figured santa out.
John Lee
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cool!
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:
Everyone goes to school until they are 18 (unless they drop out).

Drop out means person fails in any class[after exam] or person decides not to go ??
Frank Carver
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Are you ssaying that if you don;t apss your "O" levels you can't continue to go to school?
Not quite. It gets even more complicated.
O-Level/GCSE/Standard exam results at age 16 are used as entrance discriminators for the next stage of education, or for leaving education.
If you are fed up with education completely, you may leave school at 16 and go out to work whatever your results. Don't expect to get a top career, though.
If you still want to learn a trade, but dislike the whole school thing, you can try and find an employer who will offer on-the-job training via an apprenticeship program, join the armed forces etc.
If you don't like academic subjects and/or don't want to continue at the same school, you can go to a "further education" (FE) college and study for any of a wide varety of "vocational" qualifications
including NVQ ("National Vocational Qualification") awards, "City & Guilds" qualifications, the AVCE ("Advanced Vocational Certificate of Education) that I teach, and so on.
If you do fairly well at 16 and wish to continue the traditional "academic" route, you can progress to A-level/Higher. The results of these exams are usually used as a descriminator for attendance at a "Higher Education" (HE) college or university.
Unlike regular schools, FE colleges and the various HE institutions happily accept students of any age (well, any age over 16, usually!). If you want to go back and "top-up" your qualifications, or get some basic skills for a career change then you can study for GCSE/A-level either during the day or in the evenings, or sign up for any of the vocational or HE programmes run during the day.
And there is also the option of "The Open University", a distance-learning system offering HE (degree, masters and doctorate) study to all comers.
Education is usually free (government funded) from age 3 until age 18.
In my own case I followed the traditional O-Level/A-Level route (gaining 3 A-levels), then deviated slightly to join the Royal Navy for a few years. After leaving the Royal Navy I went to University and gained a BSc degree. I then got a job, but after a few years felt the need for more study/qualifications, so for a while I did another evening-class A-level each year. When I had exhausted the interesting courses at the local college, I started a MSc programme with the Open University (currently paused, part-completed). At the moment I am studying for a City & Guilds teacher-training qualification equivalent to the first half of a PGCE (Post-Graduate Certificate in Education, effecively a specialised "Masters" programme), and plan to convert to the real PGCE when I finish this stage.
So the simple answer is that although without passing GCSE/Standard level you can't usually go straight on to A-Level at the same school, you don't get kicked out of education if you don't want to.
Did any of that make sense?


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Anonymous
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That way I think Indian education system is very cruel.If you fail in 10th i.e. O level or 12th, your education life is almost over.Also if you don't excel in Scienceand Maths and go for Arts or commerce,you are 'ordinary'.Rishi Valley school started by philosopher J Krishnamurthy was I think should be the ideal school.
John Lee
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elementry education is cruel in china as well. i think the competition is not less than india. in recent years, chinese student won most olympic subject contest in the world, that is a evidence.
SJ Adnams
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Same in the UK. If you fail your 'O' level (lower than grade C gcse), your education is over.
You can do vocational courses (BTEC that kind of thing), or take the 'O' levels again.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Ravish Kumar:

Drop out means person fails in any class[after exam] or person decides not to go ??

Decides not to go.
The way it works in the US is that all your education from kindergarten (age 5) thorugh 12th grade (age 18) is free. Everyone goes right through unless they get sick of school and drop out which you can do at age 16. Assuming you earn a high school diploma, everyone can find a college that will accept them. There are no tests in high school that are used to weed anyone out. You do take a test called the SAT (scholastic aptitude test) which is used by colleges to help determine if they want you.
There is nothing like "O" levels in the US. In NY, we do have regents test which determine if you know the high school material but they are used to determine whether you get a high school diploma, not to determine whether you can continue in high school. As I said earlier, everyone can go to high school until they are 18 (12th grade) if they want to.
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:

As I said earlier, everyone can go to high school until they are 18 (12th grade) if they want to.

Badiya Hai .. [its good]
You mean there are no exams till 12th [I am not considering age]
Actually I also think there should be no exam atleast upto class 5-6th... but not upto 12th.
Do you have exams in colleges[graduation/PG] ?
When is the first time one takes any exam ?
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Ravish Kumar:
Do you have exams in colleges[graduation/PG] ?
When is the first time one takes any exam ?

What do you mean by "exams"?
You take tests with every class you take in college but there is no standardized test to take to get a college degree. Degrees are awarded by accredited colleges and universities based on successfully passing a certian number of credits.
In high school there are tests all the time in each class. In NY there is a standardized series of tests that you need to take to get a high school diploma. You take them near the end of each year from 9th to 12th grade.
Marcus Green
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As was mentioned, the O'level (or Ordinary level as it was surprisingly called), was effectivly replaced by the GCSE exam.
The results students get at that stage determine what they can study after the age of 16. They don't control if you can or cannot study after 16. So typically you need to get certain results at GCSE to go on to study at A (addvanced) level, but there are other routes of study apart from A levels.
I have been teaching 16-18 year olds full time in the UK for the last few months so I have some insight into this.
Marcus


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R K Singh
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What do you mean by "exams"?
you sit in a room under surveillance of teacher and you are given question paper and you are suppose to solve the question. Your marks will depend on correct answers
I think what exam is in India's terminology, test is in US.
Hmmm.... actually here test is refred to lighter exam or school/college interim exam.
Test generally refered to the exam which is not going to affect his carrier [in very genaral term.]
You take tests with every class you take in college but there is no standardized test to take to get a college degree. Degrees are awarded by accredited colleges and universities based on successfully passing a certian number of credits.
Then you guys are eating cakes...
In high school there are tests all the time in each class.
There is one exam in 10 and then 12 which is state level or country level, depends on which borad is associated with your school/college.
Ah... first board exam of 10th ... I can never forget ... waiting for result whole night at news agency.
[ May 21, 2003: Message edited by: Ravish Kumar ]
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Ravish Kumar:
Then you guys are eating cakes...
I have no idea what you mean by this. Do you think that this means that a degree from MIT or Harvard is not any good because we don't have a special exam?
We do not have anything like your "O" levels.
 
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