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Mely Carlos
Greenhorn

Joined: Aug 06, 2001
Posts: 5
The power of this programming language is beyond me and hats off to all of you who gets it. I do want to understand it though. What would be a good way to really understand and get into the flow of java? I have a pretty good idea of its capabilities but I am having a hard time putting them together. Would someone pls help?
Deepak Mahbubani
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 12, 2001
Posts: 68
The power of Java (TM) lies in its capabilites which you are already aware of. To put them together, you could start off with Core Java and skim throught the first few pages of each chapter. That should give you a fair idea.
Originally posted by Mely Carlos:
The power of this programming language is beyond me and hats off to all of you who gets it. I do want to understand it though. What would be a good way to really understand and get into the flow of java? I have a pretty good idea of its capabilities but I am having a hard time putting them together. Would someone pls help?

Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
What would be a good way to really understand and get into the flow of java?
The only way to really learn and understand a computer language is to USE it so start coding as much as you can. How about taking the Cattle Drive. Pse make sure you also read About the Cattle drive
Good luck
Tim Blommerde
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 24, 2001
Posts: 21
Dear Mely Carlos,
If you are really interested in learning the Java programming language I'd recommend "The Java Tutorial: A short course on the Basics", a book by Mary Campione and part of "The Java Series". It's now in its third edition and should be available at every technical bookstore.
It's one of the best Java books for beginners, and I've seen a lot of them. It is far better than all the 'Learn Java in X minutes/hours/days/weeks' books. If you're still interested in becoming a skilled Java programmer after finishing the above mentioned book, the "Core Java" books - part I and part II - are probably your next best thing, as Deepak Mahbubani already mentioned in a previous reply. But these books are more used as referential books than as books that can be used to start out with.
Of course Sun's Java site is also a great place to start. It contains lots of information, tutorials and all the stuff you need to start coding right away. The Sun site also contains an online version of the above mentioned book, though not sure if it's still complete. It can be found at the following address http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/?frontpage-spotlight .
Good luck,
Tim Blommerde
Ivan Tamayo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2001
Posts: 49
The best way to learn anything (including programming), is DOING.
There�re hundreds of tutorials and exercises available in the web, and book like "Java Cookbook" are excellent for this.
John Kilbourne
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 22, 2001
Posts: 30
I think the hardest thing about "doing" is having the gumption to go forward even though you really don't understand.
I remember being shy of learning about exceptions because I just didn't get what they were about or how they worked. Ditto for Actions, JDBC, networking, and even the concept of casting. I think you need to be challenged but not completely in the dark. You have to be prepared to feel kind of dumb though, and re-read something many times.
I spent probably 4 hours trying to understand one method in the Core Java book (showDialog(), which constructs a JDialog on the fly from a previoulsy made JPanel). I *really* wanted to know, though, so I kept going despite the density of my cranial skeleton. There are parts of that method I still don't understand, using SwingUtilities, but I now know more about containers, dialogs, passing ActionEvents, JFrames and components than I would otherwise understand. Java is very big.
 
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