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I just gotta get that review for "Java Cookbook" posted

Cindy Glass
"The Hood"
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 29, 2000
Posts: 8521
I have been reading the "Java Cookbook" bu Ian Darwin and I have to tell you how much fun it is. You would think that this quy is trying to answer all of the questions at JavaRanch.
Try to think of all of the questions that we see over and over. This book really tries to address many of these with both a quick answer, a detailed discussion and example code to make the point.
As a reviewer I should probable read it starting at the front and going through, but I can't resist running down the Table of Contents and picking out my favorite topics, just to see how they have been addressed.
There is a range from beginner questions like "how do I start up MSWord using Java" to much more intricate questions like "How do I edit a comma delimited file" where he provided utitily classes to handle the detail work.
This is like a Moderators dream come true. And I PROMISE that I will finish it and get in a review this week.
Thanks Ian.

"JavaRanch, where the deer and the Certified play" - David O'Meara
James Nuzzi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 35
What experience level is this book written towards? Is it for beginners or more experienced developers?
Thanks
------------------

James Nuzzi
SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD


James Nuzzi<br /> <br />SCJP 1.2, 1.4, 5.0, 6<br />SCJD<br />SCWCD<br />MCSE NT 4.0<br />MCAD C# .NET
Joe Bond
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 26, 2001
Posts: 5
I'm just posting because I want that book.
(note by Cindy: this sort of a post does not qualify for the book. Only posts with appropriate content count.)
[This message has been edited by Cindy Glass (edited September 26, 2001).]
mc lam
Greenhorn

Joined: May 03, 2001
Posts: 3
I want the book too Looks like the book will be very userful for all beginners.
Alvin Tan
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 25, 2001
Posts: 17
Hi Ian,
I was thinking of purchasing your book (though I really wouldn't mind if someone would give me a free copy) so I looked around for comments. Most people seem to like it.
But I came across this review somewhere:
<PRE>
"To judge the quality of the recipes, I checked out some
very basic and common Java problems, such as writing equals
and clone methods, synchronizing threads, and comparing
floating point numbers. In most cases, I found flaws in the
code or accompanying explanations. The discussion of equals
doesn't mention that the hashCode method needs to be
compatible with it. The recipe for clone has the method
unnecessarily throw a CloneNotSupportedException. The
explanation of synchronizing threads says that locks are
held on methods, instead of correctly pointing out that
locks are held on objects. The code for floating point
comparison requires that the user keep track of the
magnitude of the numbers being compared."
</PRE>
I hope you would use this forum to present your side of the story, because I think it is rather unfair for someone to bash your hard work (and in the process steer away potential buyers).
Ian Darwin
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 64
Originally posted by James Nuzzi:
What experience level is this book written towards? Is it for beginners or more experienced developers?
Thanks

Thanks for asking! I wrote the book aimed at people that know
the basic syntax of Java and are looking to "do more with
Java" by learning about the many parts of the Java API.
So the answer is "both" in a way; once you know the
language, the rest of learning Java well consists of learning
the API. The book provides answers to many, many "how-to"
questions along with code examples; some are simple and some
are more complex, depending on the task at hand.

------------------
Ian Darwin,
Author of Java Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Java Developers


Ian Darwin
Many questions are answered in my Java Cookbook, 2nd Edition
Ian Darwin
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 64
Originally posted by Alvin Tan:
Hi Ian,
I was thinking of purchasing your book (though I really wouldn't mind if someone would give me a free copy) so I looked around for comments. Most people seem to like it.
But I came across (the one negative review on Amazon.com)

I hope you would use this forum to present your side of the story, because I think it is rather unfair for someone to bash your hard work (and in the process steer away potential buyers).

Thanks for the opportunity to answer that review. This book is over 800 pages and it is inevitable that a few errors and
omissions would creep in. Some, but not all, of the comments above are accepted as errors and have been submitted to O'Reilly's errata page for the book and will be corrected in subsequent printings. The review you cited jumps on several
of them and concludes that the book is no good as a result.
In fact I think it's a good book despite some errors, and I will continue to improve it as I go through subsequent revisions.

------------------
Ian Darwin,
Author of Java Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Java Developers
[This message has been edited by Ian Darwin (edited September 25, 2001).]
Dan Wolden
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 21, 2001
Posts: 5
Does this book include any info on IDEs?
Ian Darwin
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 64
Originally posted by Dan Wolden:
Does this book include any info on IDEs?

Only a little! The book is mainly about APIs, not about which tool to use for applying them. I have a few pages on them,
and at the risk of being immodest will quote from the book:
There are many popular IDEs for Java... and almost everybody who uses Java has a favorite, such as Borland JBuilder, WebGain Visual Cafe, [Forte for Java], or IBM Visual Age for Java. Most of them have a free version and a Pro version. For up-to-date comparisions, you may want to consult the glossy magazines, since IDEs are updated relatively often.

Of course, since this is the Java Ranch, you'll want to sidle over to The IDEs and Tools Forum.
------------------
Ian Darwin,
Author of Java Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Java Developers
John Kilbourne
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 22, 2001
Posts: 30
I like the book because it puts examples before theory, and a good example makes a theory sink in for me. it's sort of like a book of annotated examples.
Ian Darwin
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 64
Cindy, thanks for your kind words on my book. Readers might be interested to know that I have my own web site for the book where errata appear first and where they can sign up for a (very low volume, SPAM-free) mailing list for news and events about the book, download the code examples, etc.
--Ian
Originally posted by Cindy Glass:
I have been reading the "Java Cookbook" bu Ian Darwin and I have to tell you how much fun it is. You would think that this quy is trying to answer all of the questions at JavaRanch.
Try to think of all of the questions that we see over and over. This book really tries to address many of these with both a quick answer, a detailed discussion and example code to make the point.
As a reviewer I should probable read it starting at the front and going through, but I can't resist running down the Table of Contents and picking out my favorite topics, just to see how they have been addressed.
There is a range from beginner questions like "how do I start up MSWord using Java" to much more intricate questions like "How do I edit a comma delimited file" where he provided utitily classes to handle the detail work.
This is like a Moderator's dream come true. And I PROMISE that I will finish it and get in a review this week.
Thanks Ian.

[This message has been edited by Ian Darwin (edited September 26, 2001).]
James Nuzzi
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 02, 2001
Posts: 35
Originally posted by Ian Darwin:
Thanks for asking! I wrote the book aimed at people that know
the basic syntax of Java and are looking to "do more with
Java" by learning about the many parts of the Java API.
So the answer is "both" in a way; once you know the
language, the rest of learning Java well consists of learning
the API. The book provides answers to many, many "how-to"
questions along with code examples; some are simple and some
are more complex, depending on the task at hand.

Thanks! BTW, how much JFC/SWING is covered in the book? Also, how much is there about multi-threading?
Thanks Again
------------------

James Nuzzi
SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD
k raj
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 25, 2001
Posts: 1
I too just wanna try my luck for a chance to win the java cook book
Peter Tran
Bartender

Joined: Jan 02, 2001
Posts: 783
Hi all,
There are some requirements to qualify for the book promotion.
They are:

  • You must be a registered user for the JavaRanch Forums.
  • Your registered Name must meet the Naming Policy
  • You have to select Yes for the Question "Allow Bulletin Board Administrators and Moderators To Send You Email Notices?" (We have to be able to notify you of your winnings.)
  • Submit or Respond to a Topic in the Forum we are running the Promotion on. Your post has to have something to do with that topic. (You receive an entry for each post you make so post as often as you can.)

  • -Peter
Ian Darwin
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 64
Originally posted by James Nuzzi:
Thanks! BTW, how much JFC/SWING is covered in the book? Also, how much is there about multi-threading?


One chapter on GUI (a bit of AWT but mostly Swing). Lots of examples.

Another on AWT graphics (fonts, colors, drawing...)

A full chapter on Threaded Java. The ending example is a threaded web server which dishes out HTML nicely (no servlets or JSP support in this toy server; use Tomcat if you want a real web server written in Java).

There are 26 chapters in 800 pages, so the average chapter
is about 30 pages.
------------------
Ian Darwin,
Author of Java Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Java Developers
ZEESHAN AZIZ
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 15, 2001
Posts: 162
I read some where that Tomcat is not a server, rather it is a servlet engine. I am confused, what is the difference between server and servlet engine.
Regards,
Zeeshan
Ivan Tamayo
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 13, 2001
Posts: 49
A web server is a program that listen to port 80 and accepts HTTP requests. It serves static HTML pages.
If you want to use Servlets and JSP need a servlet engine, this is like a plug-in for the web server in orden to run the Java.
Jayanthimeena
Greenhorn

Joined: Jul 24, 2001
Posts: 17
Hai all
This is for the author Ian Darwin. First thanks for comming here. I want to know how java support the multi languages well. I found one class but to me that alone is not sufficent.
I need to do some web pages in arabic where the text field has to accept the arabic char. and It is has to go from right to left.
Can anyone suggest some good book or IP addresses so that i can learn more.
Thanks all in advance
Regards
goofy
John Sinues
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 21, 2000
Posts: 52
It sounds like this book would make a very good reference
book for my library. If I don't win it, I guess I may have
to break down and purchase it. The best price I've found so
far is at http://www.bookpool.com for a reasonable $27.50.
Anyone find any better deals out there?
John
Cindy Glass
"The Hood"
Sheriff

Joined: Sep 29, 2000
Posts: 8521
Yes, but if you buy it from Amazon or FatBrain you are supporting JavaRanch. That is basically our only source of income, and the Server folks are threatening to up our monthly fee - just because we are SO active .
Ian Darwin
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 03, 2001
Posts: 64
Originally posted by ZEESHAN AZIZ:
I read some where that Tomcat is not a server, rather it is a servlet engine. I am confused, what is the difference between server and servlet engine.

To which Ivan responded:
A web server is a program that listen to port 80 and accepts HTTP requests. It serves static HTML pages.
If you want to use Servlets and JSP need a servlet engine, this is like a plug-in for the web server in order to run the Java.

Actually, it doesn't have to be a plug-in. Tomcat is both a server and a servlet (and JSP) engine. It can be used as a standalone web server, but it can also be used to add servlet support into Apache HTTPD, Microsoft IIS (as if anybody would dare to run that on the Internet after Code Red and Nimda ).
For more information, check out http://jakarta.apache.org/tomcat/ and also http://java.sun.com/products/servlets/. Note that Tomcat is the official reference implementation for Sun's Servlet and JSP specifications nowadays; the latest J2EE uses Tomcat as its servlet and JSP engine.
------------------
Ian Darwin,
Author of Java Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Java Developers
[This message has been edited by Ian Darwin (edited September 27, 2001).]
 
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