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Really new

Nelson Cardoso
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 11, 2001
Posts: 8
I have started studying java through the javatutor (CBTs) by sun... is their a more recommended route that I should take to begin with? Should I use the CBT's in combination with a reference book?
Thanx a bunch
Nelson
Mike Farnham
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 25, 2001
Posts: 76
I would think that would depend on what you are going to use Java for, since there are so many different possiblities:
1. Applets (client-side)
2. Servlets (server-side)
3. Stand-alone applications.
Also, alot will depend on your learning style - how you learn. Do you learn better by "jumping in and trying things" or do you need a more structured approach (like tutorials).
Are you just new to Java, or new to programming in general?
The Java in a Nutshell book is supposed to be the best at hand reference. However, in today's world where all the documentation is a web click away, that may be sufficient.
I, personally, like the tactile feel of thumbing through a book.
Cheers,
Mike
Originally posted by Nelson Cardoso:
I have started studying java through the javatutor (CBTs) by sun... is their a more recommended route that I should take to begin with? Should I use the CBT's in combination with a reference book?
Thanx a bunch
Nelson

John Kilbourne
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 22, 2001
Posts: 30
Here is a link to a similar question on the Sun forum: http://forum.java.sun.com/thread.jsp?forum=54&thread=169972
I'm a newbie, and like making small things that work, and modifying them. The small things come fromm books, tutorials, or just crazy things I want to do, like make a button that causes another button to appear. I have three or four books I like a lot: the Core Java book by Sun is really good, and I appreciate it more as I increase my capacity to absorb java. I like accomplishing something, from getting the program to compile to finally getting how to use Sockets and ServerSockets. I have learned that it's possible to learn a whole lot if you chew slowly and keep eating. You also have to be hungry for the meal.
There's a certain amount of trial and error, and figuring out how you learn, which is probably different from how I learn. Some books really help me a lot, and some don't; my list of good books will be different from yours.
John
Michael Finney
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 25, 1999
Posts: 508
I would focus on one source of information at a time. Keep a good reference book near you for reference purposes only.

------------------
Michael Finney
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java 2 Platform
Sun Certified Developer for the Java 2 Platform


Michael Finney - "Always Striving To Serve You Better Every Day"
http://www.smilingsoftwaresolutions.com/
Matthew Phillips
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 09, 2001
Posts: 2676
I like this tutorial. It assumes no programming background.
Matthew Phillips


Matthew Phillips
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
 
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