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To know termenology

khan ali
Greenhorn

Joined: Nov 22, 2001
Posts: 3
From: asif ali <prelinux@yahoo.com>
date :11 /01/2002
Subject: To know termenology
To: javaclinic@yahoo.com ,
dear sir
network programming the following termenology is used.
would you like to explain the termenology.
1 .port.
2. socket.
3. IP Adress.
4."abstraction".

thanks .
Fei Ng
Ranch Hand

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 1242
1 .port.
A port number represents an endpoint or "channel" for network communications. Port numbers allow different applications on the same computer to utilize network resources without interfering with each other.
Port numbers most commonly appear in network programming, particularly socket programming. Sometimes, though, port numbers are made visible to the casual user. For example, some Web sites a person visits on the Internet use a URL like the following:
http://www.mairie-metz.fr:8080/
In the above example, the number 8080 refers to the port number used by the Web browser to connect to the Web server. Normally, a Web site uses port number 80 and this number need not be included with the URL (although it can be).
In IP networking, port numbers can theoretically range from 0 to 65535. Most popular network applications, though, use numbers at the low end of the range (such as 80 for HTTP). The port number is included as a field within the header of each IP packet.

2. socket.
Normally, a server runs on a specific computer and has a socket that is bound to a specific port number. The server just waits, listening to the socket for a client to make a connection request.
On the client-side: The client knows the hostname of the machine on which the server is running and the port number to which the server is connected. To make a connection request, the client tries to rendezvous with the server on the server's machine and port.
If everything goes well, the server accepts the connection. Upon acceptance, the server gets a new socket bound to a different port. It needs a new socket (and consequently a different port number) so that it can continue to listen to the original socket for connection requests while tending to the needs of the connected client.
On the client side, if the connection is accepted, a socket is successfully created and the client can use the socket to communicate with the server. Note that the socket on the client side is not bound to the port number used to rendezvous with the server. Rather, the client is assigned a port number local to the machine on which the client is running.
The client and server can now communicate by writing to or reading from their sockets.

3. IP Adress.
An identifier for a computer or device on a TCP/IP network. Networks using the TCP/IP protocol route messages based on the IP address of the destination. The format of an IP address is a 32-bit numeric address written as four numbers separated by periods. Each number can be zero to 255. For example, 1.160.10.240 could be an IP address.
Within an isolated network, you can assign IP addresses at random as long as each one is unique. However, connecting a private network to the Internet requires using registered IP addresses (called Internet addresses) to avoid duplicates.
The four numbers in an IP address are used in different ways to identify a particular network and a host on that network. The InterNIC Registration Service assigns Internet addresses from the following three classes.
Class A - supports 16 million hosts on each of 127 networks
Class B - supports 65,000 hosts on each of 16,000 networks
Class C - supports 254 hosts on each of 2 million networks
4."abstraction".
Abstraction of Information is taking the information you need about an object and representing it using a programming syntax.
 
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subject: To know termenology