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Hello Everyone

Leena Khedkar
Greenhorn

Joined: Sep 11, 2002
Posts: 1
Hi,
I have just joined Java Ranch. I am planning to learn java and hopefully give Sun cert. exam. I am completely new to java and would like to get some helpful tips from all of u. I know c++ well but never touched java. I wold really appreciate if u guys can provide me with some free tutorials and books.
Sincerely,
Leena
Dirk Schreckmann
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 10, 2001
Posts: 7023
Welcome to JavaRanch!
Here is a list of free Java tutorials that I have found useful:
  • Sun's Java Tutorial
  • Introduction to Computer Science using Java by Bradley Kjell
  • Introduction to Programming Using Java by David J. Eck
  • Dick Baldwin's Java Programming Tutorials

  • Also, since you're already familiar with programming, you may want to take a look at Bruce Eckel's book, Thinking In Java. It's available as a free download through his website at http://www.BruceEckel.com .


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    Eureka Jana
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Sep 04, 2002
    Posts: 18
    Hi,
    Welcome.One thing I want to know, everybody is talking about sun certified cource.I actually joined here to learn java.What is that sun certified exam.is it really useful.how to apply and take exam.can I take it online.
    Help me with this information.
    Thanks,
    Eureka
    Anthony Villanueva
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 22, 2002
    Posts: 1055
    Originally posted by Eureka Jana:
    ...everybody is talking about sun certified cource.I actually joined here to learn java.What is that sun certified exam.is it really useful.how to apply and take exam.can I take it online.

    Here are the FAQs of the matter...
    Avon Barksdale
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Sep 12, 2002
    Posts: 2
    Hello. Im a beginner to java also. Ive learned some c++ from back in the day, but Im now just starting to learn java, and I would like to learn something else in conjunction with my java studies. Something that would be related to java. Can someone reccommed another language a beginner like myself should start learning along with my java studies? (preferably something that java programmers use ona regular basis)
    I've heard about XML, but I dont know if its ok to learn that unless I already know a lot of java or whatever.
    Ive also heard JSP, J2ee are great, but I think you have to know java before attempting them.
    Maybe DHTML or XML or something else?
    Greg Ostravich
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jul 11, 2002
    Posts: 112
    I think XML would be useful - you use it for Ant build files (an Open Source project similar to Make but written in Java), configuration files, and deployment descriptors.
    It's similar to HTML but is well formed - any open tag requires a close tag (although a single tag can have both if it has a slash at the end to close the tag).
    There are other rules too that I'm not listing.
    So there's my $.02 -


    Greg Ostravich - SCPJ2
    Dirk Schreckmann
    Sheriff

    Joined: Dec 10, 2001
    Posts: 7023
    prog1,
    Welcome to JavaRanch!
    We ain't got many rules 'round these parts, but we do got one. Please change your display name to comply with The JavaRanch Naming Policy.
    Thanks Pardner! Hope to see you 'round the Ranch!
    Avon Barksdale
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Sep 12, 2002
    Posts: 2
    Originally posted by Dirk Schreckmann:
    prog1,
    Welcome to JavaRanch!
    We ain't got many rules 'round these parts, but we do got one. Please change your display name to comply with The JavaRanch Naming Policy.
    Thanks Pardner! Hope to see you 'round the Ranch!


    ok i changed it.
    is this ok?
    Dirk Schreckmann
    Sheriff

    Joined: Dec 10, 2001
    Posts: 7023
    Looks good to me. Thanks.
    Anthony Villanueva
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 22, 2002
    Posts: 1055
    Originally posted by prog1:
    Hello. Im a beginner to java also. Ive learned some c++ from back in the day, but Im now just starting to learn java, and I would like to learn something else in conjunction with my java studies. Something that would be related to java. Can someone reccommed another language a beginner like myself should start learning along with my java studies? (preferably something that java programmers use ona regular basis)

    If you know some C++ already, the transition to java shouldn't be too hard. I consider java to be a "restricted" form of C++, IMHO. Why don't you refresh yourself on C++ as well, if you're looking for another language to tandem with java?
    Some pointers (no pun intended):
    1. Java is strongly typed. No typedefs or anything similar allowed. No macros either, although I heard there are some java libraries that can simulate them.
    2. The sizes of the data types are fixed and platform-independent. Local variables cannot be static. A boolean (bool) takes only two values, true or false.
    3. All Java objects have Object as a superclass. An object reference is basically a pointer to that object. No pointer arithmetic allowed. The keyword final behaves in some ways as const.
    4. Arrays are better implemented. You can't commit a fence-post error, for instance, as the compiler won't let you. And they're objects too. And speaking of errors, handling exceptions in java is not optional, as there are some exceptions that must be caught or thrown. There is also a predefined Exception class. Overall, the Java APIs are much broader in scope than stdlib.
    5. There is no copy constructor. The default behavior is shallow copying. Deep copying is enabled through implementing Object::clone(). There is no destructor either. The closest thing to it is Object::finalize()
    6. Garbage collection is taken care of by the JVM. No need for you to manage objects on the heap.
    7. No multiple implementation inheritance allowed. No private or protected inheritance either. All methods (i.e. member functions) are treated as virtual. You can't overload operators.
    8. No namespaces, but packages are somewhat analogous.
    9. Friends aren't allowed, although an inner class can do the same function for a friend class.
    10. No templates either, but there are collection classes and interfaces.
    It's nowhere near exhaustive, of course, but it's a start...
    David Brafford
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Feb 11, 2001
    Posts: 91
    If interested in taking an passing the Sun
    Certified Java Programmer Exam, take a look at:
    http://www.enterprisedeveloper.com/jcertify
    I agree that Eckel and Baldwin are excellent
    sources for learning Java and OO.
    Regards,
    Dave
     
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    subject: Hello Everyone