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Reading Java is one thing, doing it is another......

Steve Jensen
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 23, 2002
Posts: 126
Folks, I need some advice, and if anybody can make some suggestions, that'd be greatly appreciated.
Well, I've been reading a lot of Java, and following the examples in the books. But the thing is, I don't feel as though I have 'what it takes' to write programs (other than 'hello world'). So, I was wondering, can anybody recomend a good Java book, which has LOTS of GOOD worked examples in them - examples which are fully explained. I have heard of the
Java Cookbook', but I think that's just for specific Java problems.
Cheers in Advance.


John Bonham was stronger, but Keith Moon was faster.
Dirk Schreckmann
Sheriff

Joined: Dec 10, 2001
Posts: 7023
Reading well explained examples is helpful, but doing is learning. Head on over to The Cattle Drive and start work on the assignments. The assignments start out easy and gradually progress to more complicated/involved solutions. As you go through them, your confidence is sure to increase.
And you may appreciate browsing through the typical list of free on-line Java tutorials and books that I have found useful that I've posted before:
  • Sun's Java Tutorial
  • Introduction to Computer Science using Java by Bradley Kjell - Lots of decent, introductory explanations and examples.
  • Introduction to Programming Using Java by David J. Eck
  • Dick Baldwin's Java Programming Tutorials
  • Interactive Programming In Java by Lynn Andrea Stein -- This book follows an object first approach to understanding object-oriented programming. Take a look at the website for more information on the approach that the book takes.
  • Bruce Eckel's Thinking In Java -- Bruce Eckel assumes that the reader has a background/familiarity in C, though I've never studied a different language and had no problem understanding this book when I began to study Java.


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    Steve Jensen
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Sep 23, 2002
    Posts: 126
    Originally posted by Dirk Schreckmann:
    Reading well explained examples is helpful, but doing is learning. Head on over to The Cattle Drive and start work on the assignments. The assignments start out easy and gradually progress to more complicated/involved solutions. As you go through them, your confidence is sure to increase.


    Cheers, thanks. This looks good.
    Thing is, where are the solutions to the problems on the cattledrive?
    Paul Stevens
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: May 17, 2001
    Posts: 2823
    In your head waiting to be pulled out
    Cindy Glass
    "The Hood"
    Sheriff

    Joined: Sep 29, 2000
    Posts: 8521
    You write your proposed solution, and send it in, and you get back a bunch of nitpicks about how to make it better.
    By the time that you pass each assignment you will be significantly better.


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