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Thanksgiving

HS Thomas
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
We (old office mates) are kind of considering departing from tradition and having a non tradiitonal fayre this Christmas. ( English Christmas dinners are the best but how would you know unless you've tried something else ?).
Options under consideration so far (but other sugestions welcome) :
Mongolian

Russian
I can locate one Mongolian restaurant.It's hard to miss being smack in the middle of the road between Windsor and Sun's offices in Camberley.
I'm sure I'll have no trouble finding Russian restaurants seeing as we are in a state of romance with some things Russian. Should we be looking for a 1951 menu that hasn't changed since ? ( some diner on the Trans Siberian railway hasn't changed it's menu since 1951. Relevance : Russians lost interest in cuisine after this date ? )
Any pointers what might be served up ?
The Mongolian suggestion is because that might have been staple fare in the Middle East around TE Lawrence time , if not Christ's time - so we are looking for a theme here. Belly dancing etc.
We are planning to have some Tallis choral singing afterwards to get us in the sombre mood for Christmas afterwards and be well prepared to appreciate the Three Wise Men bearing gifts , babe in the manger, etc .
"Richly Deserved plug : one of the best choral ensembles currently around working with the polyphonic Renaissance repertory, the Tallis Scholars, will be touring around the United States and Britain in December. Here are their tour dates - if they're in your city, you should go!
Tuesday 2 December - Oberlin, OH
Wednesday 3 December - Kansas City, MO
Friday 5 December - Seattle, WA
Saturday 6 December - Vancouver, BC
Sunday 7 December - Los Angeles, CA
Tuesday 9 December - Portland, OR
Wednesday 10 December - Berkeley, CA
Friday 12 December - Boston, MA
Saturday 13 December - New York, NY
Sunday 14 December - Daytona Beach, FL
Saturday 20 December 2003 at 7.30pm (Hazard Chase Christmas Festival, St John's, Smith Square, London, call for tickets)"
regards
[ November 19, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by HS Thomas:
The Mongolian suggestion is because that might have been staple fare in the Middle East around TE Lawrence time , if not Christ's time - so we are looking for a theme here. Belly dancing etc.
Have any of you ever had access to a map? Mongolia is betweeen China and Russia. TE Lawrence would not have had any Mongolian food.


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HS Thomas
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
I understand Mongolian cuisine is mostly based around sheep.
It sounds Middle Eastern to me. I am not particularly versed in food from Central Asia or Middle East but Mongolia might have retained some of the original cuisine which is lost in the Middle East.
Next you are going to tell me Mongolians don't have belly dancing.
Thomas, with your Slav ancestry you may throw some light on pre 1950s to modern Russian food.
regards
HS Thomas
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
Yak ribs
Genghis Murphy's Mousse
Taking a peek at the ingredients it's Chinese dressed up as Mongolian.
Real Mongolian cuisine has sheeps eyes and other parts grilled or BBQ'd
God knows what they do to the Yak.
I'm not sure how far we need to go down this authenticity route.
Come Easter we will be en-route to test the theory that
"the second fastest way to get yourself nailed to a tree is to point out a
religion's fallicies to members of that religion.
The *fastest way* is to completely embrace the same religion at face value in front of the same people".
In true Python spirit, of course.
regards
[ November 19, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by HS Thomas:
I understand Mongolian cuisine is mostly based around sheep.
It sounds Middle Eastern to me. I am not particularly versed in food from Central Asia or Middle East but Mongolia might have retained some of the original cuisine which is lost in the Middle East.
Next you are going to tell me Mongolians don't have belly dancing.
Thomas, with your Slav ancestry you may throw some light on pre 1950s to modern Russian food.
regards
96% of the population of Mongolia is Buddhist. I think Buddhists are more famous for staring into their navels than displaying them while dancing. I have no idea what you mean by Mongolia might have retained some of the original cuisine which is lost in the Middle East. Why would a people who live thousands of miles from the Middle East have anything to do with Middle Eastern cooking?
As far as real Mongolian cooking, I found this on a Mongolian web site. Happy eating:

An old Mongolian saying goes something like: 'Breakfast, keep for yourself; lunch, share with your friends; dinner, give to your enemies'. The biggest and most important meals for Mongolians are breakfast and lunch, which will usually consist of boiled mutton with lots of fat and flour and maybe some dairy products or rice. The Kazaks in western Mongolia add variety to their diet with horse meat. The Mongolians are big tea drinkers and the classic drink is s��tei tsai (salty tea). Men who refuse to drink arkhi (vodka) are considered wimps, while herders make their own unique home brew airag, which is fermented horse's milk with an alcoholic content of about 3%. Many Mongolians distill it further to produce shimiin arkhi, which boosts the alcohol content to around 12%.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by HS Thomas:
Thomas, with your Slav ancestry you may throw some light on pre 1950s to modern Russian food.
My grandmother thought Russians were pigs. Germans too, for that matter. I don't remember too much of her cooking but she was big on chicken livers. She also made an incredible apple strudel. It took her all day to make it and it would be gone 5 minutes after it came out of the oven.
HS Thomas
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
Thanks for the geographical tips, Thomas. Mongolian cuisine is sounding less appetising by the minute. The other alternative is pre 1950s Russian.
The best apfel strudel I've had came out of a box - Sara Lee I think.
You wouldn't happen to have the recipe for your grandmother's apple strudel ? Spending the whole day making an apfel strudel log sounds just like a Christmassy thing to do.
regards
[ November 19, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
HS Thomas
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
I hope your Grandmother's Apfel Strudel looks better than this !

Sara Lee may have had some trouble marketing German Grandma's Apfel Strudel.Sara Lee had some puffed up mostly pastry version. That looks like Filo pastry to me.
A Hungarian Goulash and Strudel Evening.
regards
[ November 21, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by HS Thomas:
You wouldn't happen to have the recipe for your grandmother's apple strudel ?
Unfortunately the recipe died with her. And no, her apple strudel didn't look anything like that picture. She wasn't German, she was Czech.
Al Newman
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Joined: Mar 30, 2003
Posts: 716
I wonder whether any restaurant in London serves Rocky Mountain Oysters? Though that is more of a spring thing than this time of year.


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Mark Fletcher
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Joined: Dec 08, 2001
Posts: 897
Originally posted by HS Thomas:
We (old office mates) are kind of considering departing from tradition and having a non tradiitonal fayre this Christmas. ( English Christmas dinners are the best but how would you know unless you've tried something else ?).

How about a good old fashioned British Curry? Go on, you know you want one...


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HS Thomas
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 3404
It all gets curried at New Years Eve. Goulash, Oysters, Apfel Strudel (? ;if it looks anything like German Grandma's).

By then we may be singing Auld Lang's Syne in Headinburgh.
(Hope that's not synonymous with something else.) I'd be skipping the offal though.
Talking of offal, from the Rocky Mountain Oyster link :

*aka: calf fries, Rocky Mountain Oysters (sheep or turkey testicles may be used also)

What! Do mountainous regions subscribe more ? I am thinking Mongolia here also.
regards
[ November 21, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
Anonymous
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Happy Thanksgiving!
 
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subject: Thanksgiving