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Author

Anyway to convert this to a method...?

James Dark
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 06, 2004
Posts: 11
Hi! The following code I have is a sound file. At the moment, I'm creating a final project for my computer science class. I wanted to be creative and add sound to my project. The following code allows you to play songs but you can only play one. I want to make it so I can call the song from another class (from my other main, which holds the acual program) in which it is automatically played when placed inside the main (it will start when called). Is this possible?


import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;

import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;

public class Sound
{
private static final intEXTERNAL_BUFFER_SIZE = 128000;

public static void main(String[] args)
{
/*
Now, that we're shure there is an argument, we
take it as the filename of the soundfile
we want to play.
*/
//StringstrFilename = args[0];
FilesoundFile = new File("C:\\Documents and Settings\\James Bond\\Desktop\\Junk Stuff\\hlss300\\Sounds\\File.wav");

/*
We have to read in the sound file.
*/
AudioInputStreamaudioInputStream = null;
try
{
audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(soundFile);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
/*
In case of an exception, we dump the exception
including the stack trace to the console output.
Then, we exit the program.
*/
e.printStackTrace();
System.exit(1);
}

/*
From the AudioInputStream, i.e. from the sound file,
we fetch information about the format of the
audio data.
These information include the sampling frequency,
the number of
channels and the size of the samples.
These information
are needed to ask Java Sound for a suitable output line
for this audio file.
*/
AudioFormataudioFormat = audioInputStream.getFormat();

/*
Asking for a line is a rather tricky thing.
We have to construct an Info object that specifies
the desired properties for the line.
First, we have to say which kind of line we want. The
possibilities are: SourceDataLine (for playback), Clip
(for repeated playback)and TargetDataLine (for
recording).
Here, we want to do normal playback, so we ask for
a SourceDataLine.
Then, we have to pass an AudioFormat object, so that
the Line knows which format the data passed to it
will have.
Furthermore, we can give Java Sound a hint about how
big the internal buffer for the line should be. This
isn't used here, signaling that we
don't care about the exact size. Java Sound will use
some default value for the buffer size.
*/
SourceDataLineline = null;
DataLine.Infoinfo = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class,
audioFormat);
try
{
line = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);

/*
The line is there, but it is not yet ready to
receive audio data. We have to open the line.
*/
line.open(audioFormat);
}
catch (LineUnavailableException e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
System.exit(1);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
System.exit(1);
}

/*
Still not enough. The line now can receive data,
but will not pass them on to the audio output device
(which means to your sound card). This has to be
activated.
*/
line.start();

/*
Ok, finally the line is prepared. Now comes the real
job: we have to write data to the line. We do this
in a loop. First, we read data from the
AudioInputStream to a buffer. Then, we write from
this buffer to the Line. This is done until the end
of the file is reached, which is detected by a
return value of -1 from the read method of the
AudioInputStream.
*/
intnBytesRead = 0;
byte[]abData = new byte[EXTERNAL_BUFFER_SIZE];
while (nBytesRead != -1)
{
try
{
nBytesRead = audioInputStream.read(abData, 0, abData.length);
}
catch (IOException e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
}
if (nBytesRead >= 0)
{
intnBytesWritten = line.write(abData, 0, nBytesRead);
}
}

/*
Wait until all data are played.
This is only necessary because of the bug noted below.
(If we do not wait, we would interrupt the playback by
prematurely closing the line and exiting the VM.)

Thanks to Margie Fitch for bringing me on the right
path to this solution.
*/
line.drain();

/*
All data are played. We can close the shop.
*/
line.close();

/*
There is a bug in the jdk1.3/1.4.
It prevents correct termination of the VM.
So we have to exit ourselves.
*/
System.exit(0);
}

private static void printUsageAndExit()
{
out("SimpleAudioPlayer: usage:");
out("\tjava SimpleAudioPlayer <soundfile>");
System.exit(1);
}

private static void out(String strMessage)
{
System.out.println(strMessage);
}

}
[ June 03, 2004: Message edited by: James Dark ]
Tim West
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 15, 2004
Posts: 539
Yup, it's possible. Why not try? People here will be happy to help you with problems you encounter.


--Tim
James Dark
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 06, 2004
Posts: 11
At the moment I'm trying to work on this but I don't know how to do so. The farthest I get is this:

I removed the comments to decrease the length...

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioFormat;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioInputStream;
import javax.sound.sampled.AudioSystem;
import javax.sound.sampled.DataLine;
import javax.sound.sampled.LineUnavailableException;
import javax.sound.sampled.SourceDataLine;

public class Sound
{
private static final int EXTERNAL_BUFFER_SIZE = 128000;

public void song()
{

File soundFile = new File("C:\\Documents and Settings\\James Bond\\Desktop\\Junk Stuff\\hlss300\\Sounds\\File.wav");

AudioInputStream audioInputStream = null;
try
{
audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(soundFile);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
System.exit(1);
}

AudioFormat audioFormat = audioInputStream.getFormat();

SourceDataLine line = null;
DataLine.Info info = new DataLine.Info(SourceDataLine.class,
audioFormat);
try
{
line = (SourceDataLine) AudioSystem.getLine(info);
line.open(audioFormat);
}
catch (LineUnavailableException e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
System.exit(1);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
System.exit(1);
}
line.start();

int nBytesRead = 0;
byte[] abData = new byte[EXTERNAL_BUFFER_SIZE];
while (nBytesRead != -1)
{
try
{
nBytesRead = audioInputStream.read(abData, 0, abData.length);
}
catch (IOException e)
{
e.printStackTrace();
}
if (nBytesRead >= 0)
{
int nBytesWritten = line.write(abData, 0, nBytesRead);
}
}

line.drain();

line.close();

System.exit(0);
}

private static void printUsageAndExit()
{
out("SimpleAudioPlayer: usage:");
out("\tjava SimpleAudioPlayer <soundfile>");
System.exit(1);
}

private static void out(String strMessage)
{
System.out.println(strMessage);
}

}

Please help me out. My teacher never instructed us and made us learn java on our own.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
 
subject: Anyway to convert this to a method...?