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Installing Jakarta Commons Net

 
Mike Cutter
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I heard about the Jakarta Commons Net library to create an FTP client with Java. My understanding is that Jakarta Commons Net library is better than Sun's FTP client. I went to this URL.
http://jakarta.apache.org/commons/net/download.html

I downloaded commons-net-1.2.2.tar.gz. On an HP-UX 11.11 system, I am able to uncompress the tar file and untar the library in the /tmp file. Where do I put this new commons-net-1.2.2 directory so I can use the library? I know that HP's SDK is located in the path /opt/java1.4. I have never really used a library other Sun's, so I am new to installing and configuring 3rd party Java libraries.

Once I get the the Jakarta Commons Net library in the right path. Do I access it by:

import org.apache.commons.net.*;
import org.apache.commons.net.io.*;
import org.apache.commons.net.util.*;

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Marilyn de Queiroz
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I think you might get a faster/better reply in either the "Linux/UNIX" forum or the "Other Open Source Projects" forum.
 
Fisher Daniel
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Hi,
I think you can put that library wherever you want.
And when you compile and running the source code you can using


Hope this help...
Correct me if I am wrong

daniel
 
Dun Dagda
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Hi,

I had the same problem with the jakarta commons library, but on a PC system running Windows XP. I found from the Java API documentation that if you put third-party library .jar files in the ext directory, which on my system is C:\jdk\jre\lib\ext, the javac compiler will find them on the classpath automatically, so you can use import statements in your source code files as you described, just like with any other core java package. Perhaps there is an equivalent directory on your UNIX system?

At least, when I did this, it seems to work OK on my system. I didn't have to use the -classpath flag of javac to get the source to compile.

DD
 
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