The moose likes Beginning Java and the fly likes self study or.... Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Java » Beginning Java
Bookmark "self study or...." Watch "self study or...." New topic
Author

self study or....

ISLAMSAIED
Greenhorn

Joined: Apr 26, 2005
Posts: 4
hi all :
iam one of those who love java so much i began before 1 year but i wanna to be a pro ,i wanna to reach a devolper degree, should i take courses or read alot from books which i did before ,.......... help me a good advice
Layne Lund
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 06, 2001
Posts: 3061
I have only taken one formal college class in Java. Everything else that I know about the language and associated tools, I have learned on my own, either with books, online tutorials, or messages boards such as this one.

If you haven't taken a class about Java yet, it might be a good idea. I'm sure you'll learn some new things. In my opinion there is only so much you can learn from a college course. It's a great way to learn the basics, but there comes a point when you just have to learn on your own.

Layne


Java API Documentation
The Java Tutorial
Philip Heller
author
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 24, 2000
Posts: 119
I hope this post doesn't come across as self-serving.

I belong to the generation of programmers who started our careers in C. Years later, when we were really comfortable with the language, C++ came out. It wasn't very hard to learn, because we knew about things like compilers and debuggers and source code and semicolons; all we had to do was figure out what o-o was all about, and we were in good shape. Then Java came out, and it wasn't very hard to learn. Conceptually it's a lot like C++, just a whole lot cleaner and more modern. So my generation learned Java pretty easily.

But what about new programming students? It's immensely harder to learn Java if you don't have any of the classical background. Every year my publisher asked if I wanted to write a "Java for new programmers" book, and I always said "no, thanks". I thought the job was impossible. But a few years ago I realized the project could be fun in a really challenging way. It would be like a fish writing about water: I would have to think really hard about introducing concepts in the right order, and I would have to make sure not to overwhelm readers. (One introductory book covers class libraries, the world-wide web, objects, design patterns, and UML ... in Chapter 1! I thought that was overwhelming. In writing a book, what you leave out is as important as what you leave in.)

So I took a couple of years, and came up with "Ground-Up Java", which I believe is the first really effective Java intro for people who don't have that C/C++ background, and maybe don't have any programming experience at all. Since I talk with my hands a lot, I included a couple dozen animated illustrations, which are programs that visually demonstrate the mechanics of various concepts. It's like a little simulated me, standing on your desk and drawing on your screen as if it were a whiteboard.

I hope my approach to the challenge (and especially the animated illustrations) can make Java accessible the the new generation of programmers.


Consultant to SCJP team.<br />Co-designer of SCJD exam.<br />Co-author of "Complete Java 2 Certification Study Guide".<br />Author of "Ground-Up Java".
Megs Maquito
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 18, 2005
Posts: 84
Hi,

Did you mean you want a Developer certification? Do you already have a Programmer Certification? Or a professional Developer without certification?

I personally would go for the certification route. If money is not a problem then enrolling in courses that would heighten your chances of getting certified would be the best route aside from being a regular element of this ranch.


I'm a Hood Ornament
Aaron Jackson
Greenhorn

Joined: Jun 03, 2005
Posts: 9
Originally posted by Philip Heller:
So I took a couple of years, and came up with "Ground-Up Java", which I believe is the first really effective Java intro for people who don't have that C/C++ background, and maybe don't have any programming experience at all. .. I included a couple dozen animated illustrations, which are programs that visually demonstrate the mechanics of various concepts. It's like a little simulated me, standing on your desk and drawing on your screen as if it were a whiteboard.


This sounds really interesting! Feel free to send a complimentary copy (autographed please) to the following address:

Aaron Jackson
234...

Ok, I'm just kidding, but the book does sound good. I am in Head First Java right now and find it to be fantastic, but I'm sure I will need a few more "beginner" books before I'm ready to move on as I am a slow learner. So feel free to send a complimentary copy...
 
 
subject: self study or....