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Question on J2EE

 
lorraine carry
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I want to learn J2EE but that task looks overwhelming and time consuming since I don't know anything about the subject.

I see many advertised tools like JETSON and ThinkCAP claiming that non J2EE developers can develop applications in JAVA using these tools.

I want to know the pros and cons of using these tools.
Do they actually present a viable alternative to learning J2EE?

I am not looking for endorsements or critics of these products. Chances are they will be over my head anyway.

Your responses are very appreciated.
lcw
 
Jesus Angeles
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Originally posted by lcw gary:
I want to learn J2EE but that task looks overwhelming and time consuming since I don't know anything about the subject.

I see many advertised tools like JETSON and ThinkCAP claiming that non J2EE developers can develop applications in JAVA using these tools.

I want to know the pros and cons of using these tools.
Do they actually present a viable alternative to learning J2EE?

I am not looking for endorsements or critics of these products. Chances are they will be over my head anyway.

Your responses are very appreciated.
lcw


you may have posted in the wrong forum. this may get deleted or moved to other forums.

anyway, you are right about one thing, learning j2ee is 'time consuming', as it is composed of large technologies. you have to start at learning java as a language(try head first java book), after that, you can proceed to j2ee. at j2ee, you can pursue one at a time: jsp/servlet, ejb, web services. j2ee as a whole is another specification(j2ee specs, you can download free, but you can do the tutorial so as not to overwhelm you)

i dont know about the tools you mentioned. they could be higher generation languages that automatically generates java codes based on your specifications.

take it one at a time. it cant be done like, in 2 weeks. that is why we lots of job roles. because current technology is so wide now that each person can focus on limited stuff only.
 
lorraine carry
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Thank you for your response and sorry if I posted to the wrong forum.
Can you please suggest the right one.?

I am already familiar with Java and OOP but still see J2EE as a very high mountain to climb.

lcw.
 
Marilyn de Queiroz
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Hi, lcw gary

Welcome to JavaRanch! How do you pronounce your name? Have you read the JavaRanch Naming Policy?

I am not familiar with the tools that you mention, Jetson and ThinkCap. Do you know basic Java? I think learning parts J2EE (after you already know basic Java) is not any more difficult than learning basic Java. If you want to learn Java or J2EE, you'll find lots of help here at JavaRanch.
 
Rick O'Shay
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J2EE is wide and deep and it will indeed take time to understand it, apply it and become proficient with the constituent technologies. Anything that is not taken in steps can be overwhelming. Start with introductory books and move up from there. There is a wealth of information out there on J2EE.

I have not heard of ThinkCap or Jetson and would personally recommend using Sun Java Creator Studio or M7's NitroX.

http://www.m7.com/

http://developers.sun.com/prodtech/javatools/jscreator/index.jsp

They are both superb tools for J2EE noobs.
 
lorraine carry
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Thank you all for your help.
 
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