• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

question from beginner

 
Jose Cisse
Greenhorn
Posts: 28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hey everybody~~~
maybe a stupid question, but just wonder~~~
how 2 make several classes, and make a relationship between them~~~like UML CLASS DIAGRAMS???
im trying, but i just cant c any UML icons or diagrams in my ~~~
iz there anything else i need2 download???

many thx~~~~~~~~ )))))))))
[ March 20, 2006: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
 
marc weber
Sheriff
Posts: 11343
Java Mac Safari
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome to JavaRanch!

The JDK download from Sun does not include a GUI IDE. If you need to code visually, then you will need a third-party product. Check the IDE forum for suggestions.
 
Bert Bates
author
Sheriff
Posts: 8898
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Jose -

If you're just learning Java, I'd recommend that you NOT use an IDE for a while! I think you'll get a better idea of what's going on if you use a text editor and run java and javac from the command line. Once you've got the basics down you can switch over to the IDE, but it's a good idea to understand what the heck that IDE is doing before you start using it!

hth,

Bert
 
Jeremy Tartaglia
Ranch Hand
Posts: 62
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Actually, I disagree with Bert. While it is important that you understand exactly what's going on when you compile your programs, command line interfaces are not to be taken lightly. They can be difficult to get used to, annoying to work with, and disheartening when all you see are errors.

The most important thing right now is that you learn how to program in Java. Without the strain of also learning the compiler, the command line interface, the VM flags, and how to properly install the JDK into your chosen OS, you can better understand how Java programs themselves must be written. Then, you can learn all the details of the JVM if you wish.

As for good IDEs, I can personally recommend JBuilder, NetBeans, Forte, and Eclipse (in my order of preference). They all do the job admirably, and are relatively easy to use, if somewhat heavyweight. (JBuilder requires something like 512-768 MB of memory.)

So, goodluck on your Java learning.
 
marc weber
Sheriff
Posts: 11343
Java Mac Safari
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Originally posted by Jeremy Tartaglia:
... The most important thing right now is that you learn how to program in Java. Without the strain of also learning the compiler, the command line interface, the VM flags, and how to properly install the JDK into your chosen OS, you can better understand how Java programs themselves must be written...

I've never heard that argument before.

Normally, it's the other way around, since IDEs tend to have more of a learning curve, do a lot of things that a beginner should be doing themselves, and can "hide" a lot of what's going on. I have to agree with Bert.
 
Jherald Lacambra
Ranch Hand
Posts: 129
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some of the IDE's nowadays are spoon feeding. Meaning just click of a button or drag and drop an item will create a code for you. You will not learn if these things will do by your IDE. Infact there are a lot of IDE's out there to choose from. But if you get used to one of these IDE's without learning the basics, you will be dependent on it. Nowadays there are company that uses IDE's of their own(maybe their own product). If you get used to your IDE then, you will find hard time to learn their IDE(if you learn the basics from your IDE).
 
Jeff Albertson
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1780
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I good example of IDE addiction is when someone feels they "must" use one to write GUI code. Whack.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic