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Setting up JAVA

William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Howdy Partners

I just started reading the "Head First JAVA" by Kathy Seirra & Bert Bates because I want to learn JAVA too. The problem right now is I have down loaded the J2SE and the API documentation they say to down load, however, nothing happens after that. The Application doesn't come up. I don't see a PATH anywhere. How do I get all of this stuff up and running on my PC?

njaxwill
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Welcome to JavaRanch!

Here are Sun's installation instructions for Windows. Note that after installing, you will not see an icon or an entry under the programs menu. Instead, you will compile and run Java from the Command Prompt. (I believe the Windows Command Prompt is under Start / Programs / Accessories. You will probably want to make a shortcut for this.)

After installation, try compiling and running a "Hello World" program to make sure it all works. This Hello World tutorial will take you through all the steps.

Post back with any specific problems.
[ March 23, 2006: Message edited by: marc weber ]

"We're kind of on the level of crossword puzzle writers... And no one ever goes to them and gives them an award." ~Joe Strummer
sscce.org
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Howdy Rancher

Well, I tryed to install the installation Java for Windows, but it didn't do anything as well. I emailed the authors of "Head First Java" , but I have not received anything just yet. What did try to do is hit the start in windows where that will show all programs including the Sun Microsystems logo and then it points to the Application Server PE which then points the all of the tools including start default server.

njaxwill
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Originally posted by William Lifka:
... What did try to do is hit the start in windows where that will show all programs including the Sun Microsystems logo and then it points to the Application Server PE which then points the all of the tools including start default server...

Okay, I think you downloaded the Enterprise Edition (EE), which includes the Application Server. This edition is for more advanced server-side programming. (You're definitely not going to need the Application Server for Head First Java.) But if I'm not mistaken, the Enterprise Edition download also includes the Standard Edition (SE) development kit (JDK), which is what you really want.

Did you try following the links in my previous post for installation instructions and the Hello World tutorial? If so, what happened?

Again, note that you will not see an icon or a listing in the programs menu. Instead, you will compile and run Java from the Command Prompt. This is described in the Hello World tutorial.
[ March 23, 2006: Message edited by: marc weber ]
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Hey Guys and Gals

Still can't find the complier, but I'll keep on trying. I guess I'll call sun and try to get somebody to walk me through the installation part of it again.

See Ya

Bill
ken zemaitis
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 26, 2005
Posts: 42
hey.
chances are you installed everything correctly.
you dont really have to find a compiler.
as that one guy said, you run java through the command prompt.
check step five of the installation instructions, this is what most people miss.
then run the hello world tutorial.
hope this helps.
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Originally posted by marc weber:
...Did you try following the links in my previous post for installation instructions and the Hello World tutorial? If so, what happened?

Again, note that you will not see an icon or a listing in the programs menu. Instead, you will compile and run Java from the Command Prompt. This is described in the Hello World tutorial.

:roll:
[ March 27, 2006: Message edited by: marc weber ]
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Howdy Partner

Well, I'm at it again. I have not given up on this Java thing just yet. I went back and installed the netbean version of Java. I hope this what I need in order to get started in Java. Yes, I went back to the Hello World and this is what it said to download. I don't have any idea if this is right or not, but nobody else seems to know either. I asked my professors at school and even they said its' a pain to download anything at Sun. Anyway, I'll try this for now. I now know what women mean when they say
"WHATEVER" to something they don't fully understand.
Amit Batra
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 04, 2006
Posts: 361
Juts make sure u have the javac in your bin folder. just 4get bout anything else for now. specially trying to set paths and all that. open notepad, write a hello world program, save it with with a .java extension in the bin folder itself. then go to the dos prmpt change path to where your bin file is and type javac yoursavedfilename.java and see what happens.
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Originally posted by William Lifka:
...I went back and installed the netbean version of Java... I don't have any idea if this is right or not, but nobody else seems to know either...

Yes, this is right, although you won't be needing NetBeans at this point.

Make sure that you carefully follow Sun's installation instructions for Windows.

In many ways, the initial set-up is the hardest part. Let us know how it goes, and post back with any problems.
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11411
    
  16

do you know how to get the command prompt marc talked about? You can also try this...

hold down the key with the Windows logo (on my keboard, it's between the CTRL and Alt keys, near the bottom left corner). while holding it, press the 'R' key. this should give you a "Run" dialog box, with a text box labeled "Open". in there type

cmd

and press OK. this should give you a pretty boring looking screen, that looks something like this:

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\frosenberger>



from here, try typing the following command:

java -version<enter>

hopefully, you'll get something like this:

java version "1.5.0_06"
Java(TM) 2 Runtime Environment, Standard Edition (build 1.5.0_06-b05)
Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 1.5.0_06-b05, mixed mode, sharing)


if this works, let us know and we'll go from here. if not, we'll solve that problem first.


There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
Linda Walters
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2005
Posts: 100
William,

I think I see what the problem is and it is one of expectations.
The key to it is when you said "... because I want to learn JAVA too. "
TOO, as in also. Which leads me to believe that you have been programming maybe a Microsoft Visual Studio environment or Borland Delphi.

The Java world is different. There is no standard, one fits all windows integrated develoment environment for Java, there are several. That is why books like "Head First Java" do not use them. Different people have different ones.

So the books tell you to use a plain text editor like Notepad and to use Command Line commands to compile and run your Java code.

If you look for some fancy IDE from Start|Programs, you will not find one.

Down load the Java SDK from Sun and follow its instructions.
The PATH and CLASSPATH that they talk about are Windows Environment Variables. If you are using Windows XP the environment variables can be gotten to at:

Start|Control Panel|System
then click on the Advanced tab and at the bottom of the dialog click on the button that says Environment Variables. The PATH (which may be lowercase) is in the window marked "system". Click on this and then click edit to modify it. You may also need to add the CLASSPATH environment variable in the same system frame. Again, follow the Sun installation instructions.

It may be necessary to reboot after doing this. Probably best to anyway.

Now, write your first Java code from the sample in the book in Notepad and save it with the .java extension to some place on your file system.

To compile it and run it, you'll need to do that from the command line window. You'll find that at Start|Programs|Accessories|Command Prompt.
Best to make a desktop shortcut for this.
Once the Command Prompt window is up follow the directions in your book for compiling and running.

Yes, this is a pain in the ass compared to an IDE, but start here, just like the book says. You'll learn more, you'll see it on the SCJP test maybe and its easier than trying to learn Java AND an IDE.

Once you have the hang of Java (about 3/4 throught Head First) then start looking for an IDE that you like: NetBeans, Eclipse, etc.

I hope this helps. If not, don't give up, we are all here to help.


<a href="http://labryssystems.net/pblog/index.php" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Javaville Gazette</a><br />Non-cooperation with evil is a duty. -- Mahatma Gandhi
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Originally posted by Linda Walters:
...write your first Java code from the sample in the book in Notepad and save it with the .java extension...

Tip: If you're using NotePad, remember to save as plain text (.txt), but put quotes around the filename to force the .java extension. Like this...

"MyClassName.java"

If you don't put the quotes around it, then NotePad will add the .txt extension and you will have MyClassName.java.txt, which won't work.
Linda Walters
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2005
Posts: 100
marc wrote:
"If you don't put the quotes around it, then NotePad will add the .txt extension and you will have MyClassName.java.txt, which won't work."


That may have been true of older versions of Notepad, but more recent (since windows 2000, if memory serves) the Save As.. dialog has a "Save as type:" combo box at the bottom with two types from which to select, Text (*.txt) and All types. If you select "All types" and enter a file name of MyClassName.java, it will be saved as that.
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Originally posted by Linda Walters:
...If you select "All types" and enter a file name of MyClassName.java, it will be saved as that.

Oh, that's cool. Shows how much I've used NotePad lately. (I'm on a Mac now, but I'll try that at work tomorrow.)
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Hi Ranch Hands

Well, I did as Fred Rosenberger requested I do and I got everything but the sharing at the end of his quoted text.Yes, it's true Linda Walters I come from the ancient by gone days of machine and assembly languages. I do understand the logic of the higher-level languages I just haven't spent that much time there. It looks pretty easy because one doesn't even have to convert anything from binary to hex or worry about if left or right justifed and is it processed using 2 or 4 words configuration. However, the old stuff was good and it did get us to the moon and back. As Jackie use to say to Alice on the Honey Mooners "one of these days Alice, to the moon baby to the moon". I, just like the guys on all of those Apollo missions "quitting" or "failure" is not an option that I will subscribe to.
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11411
    
  16

ok, so that means you HAVE java installed. now, you need to use some editor to create a file. as folks here have suggested, notepad will work fine.

try following the HelloWorld tutorial marc pointed to up above. create the HelloWorld.java file, and see if you can compile it from the command line.

a couple of pointers...

make sure the filename and the class name are IDENTICAL... i.e. if you follow the tutorial, you should make a file called "HelloWorldApp.java". make sure notepad does not tack a ".txt" on the end.

once you have that file, on the command line, type

javac HelloWorldApp.java

if it says nothing, but gives you a new prompt, see if you have a file now called HelloWorldApp.class

if so, you're doing great!!! if not, come back here, tell us what it said, and we'll keep going.

assuming you DO get that .class file, you can try running it.

run the command

java HelloWorldApp

if that doesn't work, try

java -cp . HelloWorldApp

if neither of those work, let us know, and we'll go from there.
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Howdy Ranchers

Hey, I went through the HelloWorldApp.java exercise that you all talk about,however, Windows still can't find the java compiler (javac). I was able to down load the HelloWorldApp.java from Sun. It down loaded in html, but I was able to edit the html out of it to make it just HelloWorldApp.java file on the c-disk. I tryed running on the c:\ prompt,but then I get the message about Windows can't find the java compiler (javac) again and again. Is it because I may have different kinds of java already down loaded on my c-disk and Windows can't decide which software to use? Should I go back and delete all the software and start over again? I also tryed that path thing you guys and gals talked about,let's not go there just yet! It look like Scary Moive 5. This worst than trying to finding Waldo on a box of Life Cereal. Where's javac?

Bill
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Bartender

Joined: Oct 02, 2003
Posts: 11411
    
  16

java -version

gave you the output like i posted, but it can't find javac? they're usually in the same place, i though.

i wonder if you got the JRE, not the JDK. the JRE, or Java Runtime Environment, is what you need to RUN java programs. but the JDK, or Java Development Kit, is what you need to WRITE java programs.

can you find where your java.exe is, and look there to see if javac is there as well?
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Good Morning Ranchers

Well, I'm back at it again and again. What I did this time was I deleted the Netbean version and the Environment version of "Java" from my c-disk using Microsoft's add/remove programs. What I still have on my PC is J2DE Development Kit 5.0 Update 6 size 283.00MB. I clicked on where it said click here for support information and it showed this kind of path.

C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.5.0_06

I tryed following this path to see if I can find the "bin" directory where they say the Java binaries (the tool) live. I got this?

C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.5.0_06\bin> javac HelloWorldApp.java
error: cannot read: HelloWorldApp.java
1 error

I also tryed % javac HelloWorldApp.java at the prompt and got
% is not recognized as an internal or external command,operable program or batch file.

I also tryed java HelloWorldApp.java at the prompt and got
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: HelloWorldApp/java

I feel just like my dog "Hanna" when she running around in circles chasing her tale, but not actually going anywhere. Where I'm now and what should I do next to find javac?

Bill
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Howdy Partners

I'm back at it again. I did have a small break-through I'll share with you all. I found out that your bin directory is like the I-disk on a mainframe. It's the area on your computer's disk that has almost all of the executable .excs. Furthermore, the people who wrote "Head First Java" call .exc their tools. Talk about confusing someone. Does this mean the complier for "JAVA" is just an .exc and not a complier? Okay, I think I then really need to do now is find those "path" and "classpath" to all of those .excs. This directory stuff reminds me of DOS and BASIC back in the early 80's. I was able to find the bin directory everybody is writing about and able to compile HelloWorldApp.java. It put HelloWorldApp.class on my c-disk. Now,how do I move or copy that file to the bin directory and why can't just write java c:\HelloWorldApp.class It doesn't work at the command line using the prompt.
Linda Walters
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 30, 2005
Posts: 100
William

The "%" that you see in the Head First book in the boxes that have white text on black background are, first of all Unix command line prompts, NOT Windows commandline prompts, the Windows prompt is a less-than symbol (>) and in neither case do you type them. The Head First book, like most Java books, is not written to a specific OS and may of the authors use Unix/Linux, not Windows.

I have been assuming that you are working on a PC running Windows XP or Windows 2000. Is that correct?

If so, then there probably is no C:\bin folder unless someone created it.
Unix comes with a bin, but Windows doesn't. So there isn't any one where exe files live. That said, some program installations, the Java JDK included, have a bin folder under their main folder. In the case of the Java JDK the bin folder does contain most of the exe files that are useful to the developer.

Remember what I said about the PATH and how to get to it throught the control panel? If you put the path to this bin folder into the PATH statement, then at the command prompt (C:\>) you can just type javac without having to type all the path to it, which is a major pain in the fanny. That also lets you set the current folder to the folder where you keep your source code and still just type javac and the name of your source file.

Did you get the CLASSPATH fixed up?

I know that all of this may be really confusing and much of it may seem antiquated (command prompts in this day of windows and browsers?), but there are good reason why it is so.

Please let us know how you are doing and where you may need more help.

[ April 15, 2006: Message edited by: Linda Walters ]
[ April 15, 2006: Message edited by: Linda Walters ]
William Lifka
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2006
Posts: 11
Hello Ranchers

Yes that is correct Linda Walters. The operating system is Microsoft Window XP Professional Version 2002. I went through the control panel and executed system/advanced/Environment Variables to find two variables. I added "path" and "classpath" to the User Variables for Administrator and the System Variables. My "path" and "classpath" are c:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.5.0_06\bin. I rebooted my system, but I don't know if this has done to my PC. First, I tryed executing from the c:\> from the command prompt but it doesn't work. Secondly, I set up the Command Prompt by changing (cd) in all of those directorys. My path is currently c:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.5.0_06\bin which gets me to the bin directory. While in the bin directory, I copyed the HelloWorldApp.java and HelloWorldApp.class into the bin directory. I then tryed executing the java and javac commands on those files and got this: Exception in thread "main"java.lang.NoClassDefFound Error: HelloWorldApp.class.Okay, now it is easy to say that I still don't really know if my "path" and "classpath" are set up right. What's right? How do I know? All I know right now is that I can get to the bin directory. Is this where I need to be? I can't really tell you where I need your help because I don't know where I'm at. Please, give me some kind of directions so I can figure out what to do next. Why won't the class file execute properly if it's in the bin directory with the java file? Do both files have to be in the same directory so Windows can find them? Why can I execute the java file but not the class file? It should execute by submitting c:\>Program Files\Java\jdk1.5.0_06\bin> java HelloWorldApp.class on command line. I don't get it! What's I'm doing wrong or what should I be doing in order for the file to execute the "Hello World"? I don't know? You should able to run the java.exe from that bin directory? Right? Furthermore,let me apologize right now to all of you for helping me! I am truly sorry for wasting your valuable time! I've lost 6 pounds this week by staying up and trying to work this stuff out. I guess I need to take care of myself by getting something to eat and sleep before coming back to this stuff. Again, thanks for all of time and patience. Happy Easter!

Bill
[ April 15, 2006: Message edited by: William Lifka ]
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

Originally posted by William Lifka:
...let me apologize right now to all of you for helping me! I am truly sorry for wasting your valuable time!

No need to apologize! Everyone here is a volunteer, so we're doing this because we want to.

Now, let's get this straightened out.

In general, you should leave the bin directory alone. As you've discovered, this is for binary executables, and messing with these would be a BAD THING. Keep your .java and .class files somewhere else. For example, make yourself a MyJavaFiles directory that contains nothing other than your own files.

Now, as you've also discovered, javac and java are both under the bin directory. So if you change to this directory, then the simple "javac" and "java" commands will work. This is what you're doing.

However, the easiest alternative is to set your PATH variable so that these commands can be invoked from any directory. It sounds like you've done this. Note however...
  • The PATH variable is probably a list of different items, and in Windows, the items must be separated by semicolons.
  • When the system looks at the PATH variable, it will try each item in the list from left to right, looking for one that will satisfy the request. So if you have any prior versions listed in the PATH variable, it will use the first one it finds.
  • Now, once the PATH is set up to invoke "javac" and "java" from any directory, the easiest way to compile and run your own files is to change to the directory that contains these files. For example, if you put your source file HelloWorldApp.java under c:\...\MyJavaFiles, then change the directory (cd) to...

    C:\> cd c:\...\MyJavaFiles
    C:\...\MyJavaFiles>

    From this prompt, you should be able to invoke javac on your file. (The PATH variable you set earlier will allow the system to find javac in the bin directory. And being in the directory with your file will allow it to easily find your file.)

    C:\...\MyJavaFiles>javac HelloWorldApp.java
    C:\...\MyJavaFiles>

    At this point (if you get your prompt back as shown above, with no error messages), you will have a compiled HelloWorldApp.class file in the same directory. You can run this using the java command on your file without the .class extension. Your output should appear on the following line, after which you should get your prompt back...

    C:\...\MyJavaFiles>java HelloWorldApp
    Hello World!
    C:\...\MyJavaFiles>
    William Lifka
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Mar 23, 2006
    Posts: 11
    Hey there cow foke

    I saw Marc reply and I have to respond. How do I make the MyJavaFiles directory. What are the commands? I don't remember anything in DOS except the following commands: Change Directory, Copy, Delete, Move, Directory. I tryed working out of the bin directory by executing javac and java commands from the bin directory, however, the java command responds with
    "Exception in Thread "main" java.lang,NoClassDefFoundError. HelloWorldApp". I get no where using the c:\ command prompt. Show me how set up the "path" and the "classpath" environment variable. I used \ and now used ; and still nothing is working. I thought by executing the javac and java within the bin directory that the commands would execute. I also tryed from the Program Files prompt, java prompt, jdk1.5.0_06 prompt. Windows can't find the bin directory to execute the java.exe. It's just weird to me. I just don't get it I guess! Is it possible just to go a head and read the "Head First Java" without compling and running the programs? Again, Happy Easter!

    Bill
    [ April 15, 2006: Message edited by: William Lifka ]
    Linda Walters
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Apr 30, 2005
    Posts: 100
    William,

    marc is 100% correct, do not put anything else into the bin folder in the Java folder hierarchy.

    To make things a bit easier, just put the MyJavaFiles folder (note that the term "folder" and "directory" are pretty much the same thing) directly under the root of the C: drive.

    At the command line prompt, regardless of what folder you start in, type in:
    and hit the enter key.
    your command line promopt should now be C:\>
    next type in:
    and hit the enter key.
    Now you have your MyJavaFiles folder.

    Here are some handy commandline commands and what they mean that may help
    CD - "Change Directory" enter the name of the directory that you want to be your current directory. Entering .. as the directory will take you "up" one level in the directory hierarchy.

    MKDIR - "Make Directory" creates a directory of the entered name directly under your current working directory

    COPY - Type COPY <from> <to> where <from> is the full path name of a file to be copied and <to> is the full name of the destination directory.
    Note that you do not type the angle brackets "<" and ">". By full path name, I mean that if the file is called x.txt and its in the directory C:\Stuff, but your current directory is C:\Foo and you want to copy the file to C:\Bar you would type:
    [CODE]COPY C:\Stuff\x.txt C:\Bar[/COPY]


    To see a complete list of Command Line commands, at the command line prompt type help and hit enter. That will give you a list of available commands.
    To get help on a specific command type help <command> at the prompt,where <command> is the name of the command, again without the angle brackets. Fore example to get help on the mkdir command, at the command line prompt type help mkdir.

    I'm realizing just how frustrating this can be for the very large number of people out there who have never had cause to use the old DOS command line stuff. People who are just comming to windows or PCs in general, whether they are new to computing or have been on Unix, Mac or mainframes for years, just have never seen these commands like those of us who have been on PCs for about a quarter of a century.

    I can't even think of a single in print book that might be of help. Humm.... maybe there's a niche market....
    [ April 15, 2006: Message edited by: Linda Walters ]
    marc weber
    Sheriff

    Joined: Aug 31, 2004
    Posts: 11343

    You can also use Windows Explorer for managing files and directories.
    Linda Walters
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Apr 30, 2005
    Posts: 100
    Windows Explorer is certainly a lot easier than doing all this throught command line commands, I just suggested them so William could just concentrate on the command line where he is trying to run the java compiler, so that things are consistent and he isn't having to jump from one way of working to another. This has been a confusing and frustrating enough exercise for him, and I'm sure for many others.

    I learned all this stuff because when I first started using PCs all we had was DOS command line and it was not that different than the Unix, VAX/VMS and such that I'd been using for years. Today hardly any PC users work in the command line at all and the books that are available on very basic computer use hardly even mention command line. I even checked such fundamental books as "PCs for Dummies" and "Windows XP for Dummies" today at Borders Books and neither even mention command line mode.
    William Lifka
    Greenhorn

    Joined: Mar 23, 2006
    Posts: 11
    Howdy Partners

    I think I may have figured a couple of things out on Java. When I first downloaded all the different Java packages, but then I uninstalled the ones I didn't need I really messed up some of the shareware that the different Java packeages support. In Java and at Sun, not all shareware is the same. The shareware support different operating systems(OS). Because the different Java packages support different OS means they each may have a different set of protocols. High level protocols deal with data formatting, the terminal to computer dialogue, character sets, and sequencing of messages. Microsoft knows this better than anyone and they will never sale the farm. I found this by checking the editing dates on a lot of the Java files. I had to delete all of the Java files and started over by reinstalling J2SE JDK only. I made the MyJavaFiles directory/folder and have since gone though the Hello World tutorial that Marc recommended and it all worked. I had to reset the "classpath" as Linda had recommended also I do because Windows can't find the class file at first. I had to then test for the "classpath". You do that by set classpath= which then clears the "classpath". then run the complied class program and if it works you know you have to fix your classpath". So, when using Java it's important to know the the operating system that you will be appling Java to. Again, thank you all for your time and patience. It works! Cool!

    Bill
    marc weber
    Sheriff

    Joined: Aug 31, 2004
    Posts: 11343

    Originally posted by William Lifka:
    ...It works! Cool!

    Bill


    Congratulations! The hard part is over!

    Enjoy Head First Java!
    Linda Walters
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Apr 30, 2005
    Posts: 100
    Yippie!!!
    Congrats William!

    Happy programming.
    Liyaquat Ali
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Nov 16, 2005
    Posts: 156
    Congratz William and welcome to the world of Java, albeit in the Windows System

    I came to know about Ur trials and tribulations through Linda's blog (Javaville Gazette )and just came here to check if U got thingz workin or not, but I C that U have managed to get everything working, Congratz again I am really happy for you, now U can have all the fun we all have coding in Java.

    [ April 27, 2006: Message edited by: Liyaquat Ali ]
    [ April 27, 2006: Message edited by: Liyaquat Ali ]

    Excuse me while I kiss the sky (Jimi Hendrix)
     
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    subject: Setting up JAVA