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Rockin' & Rollin'!!

 
Gail Mikels
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We're Rockin' & Rollin' in Southern California! WooHoo! It was a good one - lot's of shaking, little to no damage!

Anybody else love a "good" earthquake?
 
Jason Menard
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It's always been my dream to move to California and purchase a house built on the edge of an eroding cliff overlooking the encroaching ocean, nestled snugly along a fault line, with one side opening to a very dry forest, yet with convenient access to a racially charged intersection (nothing brings neighborhoods together like a good riot). I'd have to be no further than 20 miles or so from my office though, because I just won't stand for anything more than a three hour commute. A boy can dream, can't he?

When is mudslide season by the way?
[ June 16, 2004: Message edited by: Jason Menard ]
 
Michael Ernest
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Absolutely. No admission fee, no waiting in line, no height requirement.
 
Gabriel White
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J, perfect description of California.

I just visited again for the 6th time and I still hate it.

you want land, move to Texas.

Gabe
 
John Smith
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It's always been my dream to move to California and purchase a house built on the edge of an eroding cliff overlooking the encroaching ocean, nestled snugly along a fault line, with one side opening to a very dry forest, yet with convenient access to a racially charged intersection (nothing brings neighborhoods together like a good riot). I'd have to be no further than 20 miles or so from my office though, because I just won't stand for anything more than a three hour commute. A boy can dream, can't he?

What is it like in the inland parts of California, towards Nevada and Arizona? I looked at the map and it's very sparsely populated. Is it all desert, or is it still mild climate as it is on the the California coast? I guess what I am looking for is San Diego wheather without paying a million bucks for a house.
 
Helen Thomas
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The kingdom of Far, Far Away.

Mentioning Rockin' and Rollin', Bob Dylan is back in London on his Never Ending Tour started in 1988. He plays in Finsbury Park this weekend.
 
Michael Ernest
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I guess what I am looking for is San Diego wheather without paying a million bucks for a house.

Hell of a qualifier for California coastal weather -- a million bucks won't even get you over the hill towards the San Francisco Bay, much less the ocean.

Here are some inland thoughts --

http://www.co.alpine.ca.us/

http://www.shastacascade.org/plumas/plpage.htm

http://www.co.humboldt.ca.us/
 
Guy Allard
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Originally posted by Eugene Kononov:
It's always been my dream to move to California and purchase a house built on the edge of an eroding cliff overlooking the encroaching ocean, nestled snugly along a fault line, with one side opening to a very dry forest, yet with convenient access to a racially charged intersection (nothing brings neighborhoods together like a good riot). I'd have to be no further than 20 miles or so from my office though, because I just won't stand for anything more than a three hour commute. A boy can dream, can't he?

What is it like in the inland parts of California, towards Nevada and Arizona? I looked at the map and it's very sparsely populated. Is it all desert, or is it still mild climate as it is on the the California coast? I guess what I am looking for is San Diego wheather without paying a million bucks for a house.



When you run I-10 across the AZ/CA line, the desert does not change much.

Regularly, AZ citizens put up signs facing west, things like "Californians stay home".

The CA guys tear them down of course.

I have 4-wheeled the whole river from Mexican border to AZ/CA/Nevada tri-corner. Great country. Dry heat.

Regards, Guy
 
Jason Menard
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And if California slides into the ocean
Like the mystics and statistics say it will
I predict this motel will be standing
Until I pay my bill


--Warren Zevon
 
Gail Mikels
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True - CA's got its negative side, just like every other place. Personally, I'd rather have my home destroyed in an earthquake than sucked into the sky by a tornado!
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by Elaine Micheals:
True - CA's got its negative side, just like every other place. Personally, I'd rather have my home destroyed in an earthquake than sucked into the sky by a tornado!


Give me a good 'ol fashion hurricane anyday.
 
John Smith
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Originally posted by Michael Ernest:


Here are some inland thoughts --



Thanks for the links, Michael. One of this mentiones the City of Trinidad. I looked on the realtor.com for the prices of the single family homes around the area and found a 20 year old, 2056 sq feet house on a 3-acre lot for $250,000.

So, I must be missing something. Why would anyone settle in that CA hell that Jason describes if you can buy a piece of happiness for a reasonable $250,000? I am so far from the West Coast that I lack the basics. Could someone educate me on this issue?
 
Joe King
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Originally posted by Elaine Micheals:
True - CA's got its negative side, just like every other place. Personally, I'd rather have my home destroyed in an earthquake than sucked into the sky by a tornado!


Every year about this time, the British news programmes show the annual pictures of various villages in America being sucked up into tornados. What I want to know is:

* Why do people choose to live in places where tornados are common?
* Why do people build their houses out of wood instead of brick, which would be less likely to be blown away, especially if they live in "Tornado Alley"?
 
Helen Thomas
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Insurance must cover re-building. And the government through taxes. It's easier to re-build wooden houses than brick and more people are likely to be injured or die from being hit by bricks.

Hawaii and parts of Japan, Pacific are prone to being hit by Tornados / Tsunamis.

Still, wouldn't know the answer as to why people live in such areas. More genetically inclined to risk-taking ?

Statistics could show that more people are likely to be hit by a bus in London than die in an earthquake. Only Londoners don't know that, generally.
[ June 17, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
Hawaii and parts of Japan, Pacific are prone to being hit by Tornados / Tsunamis.


Tsunamis and tornados are two completely different phenomena. Here's some info on tsunamis. I'm not saying that tornados don't happen in Japan, but during my three years there I had never heard of any.
 
Warren Dew
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Joe King:

Every year about this time, the British news programmes show the annual pictures of various villages in America being sucked up into tornados. What I want to know is:

* Why do people choose to live in places where tornados are common?


It's a statistical thing. A tornado hitting a town destroys maybe dozens of homes, where a big earthquake or fire can destroy thousands.

If you don't believe in statistics, though, you're better off in California.

* Why do people build their houses out of wood instead of brick, which would be less likely to be blown away, especially if they live in "Tornado Alley"?

Wood is cheaper.

Helen's right about the insurance, too. Would you rather get a brand new house to replace one that was completely destroyed, or just get your damaged house repaired?
 
Gail Mikels
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Helen's right about the insurance, too.

Did you know that most basic homeowner's policies don't include earthquake insurance? I never asked if they cover tornados & hurricaines!
[ June 18, 2004: Message edited by: Elaine Micheals ]
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://aspose.com/file-tools
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