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driving on New Jersey highways

Kishore Dandu
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Joined: Jul 10, 2001
Posts: 1934
Since some one touched on DC metro trains, I want to bring this up.

I live in texas and visited NJ during labour day weekend last year. While driving from NY city to Atlantic city, I observed that NJ freeways are really weird(compared to how they are setup in other states like texas, california and upstate NY etc).

If you take a exit for some reason, it is very difficult to get back on the freeway(or toll road) at the same spot. You have to go round and round and sometimes end up getting on the road about 1-2 miles behind from where you actually exited. That really sucked.

Only preferred ay for stopping is to take the exit of a rest-stop(which is shared by both sides of the freeway).
[ June 23, 2004: Message edited by: Kishore Dandu ]

Kishore
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Damien Howard
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Joined: Apr 01, 2003
Posts: 456
I think you are confusing Jersey with California.
Michael Ernest
High Plains Drifter
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Joined: Oct 25, 2000
Posts: 7292

No, he's not. California's road systems are far, far more scrutable than most systems on the East Coast.


Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.
- Robert Bresson
Kishore Dandu
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Joined: Jul 10, 2001
Posts: 1934
Originally posted by Damien Howard:
I think you are confusing Jersey with California.


California(except for sanfran inside the city) are 10 times much better than NJ highways/toll roads.

It made a impression that NJ people does not want anybody to exit and buy stuff in the towns along the freeways.
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
New Jersey's roads were designed by the civil engineering school for the criminally insane. (Sorry if that was your brother in law, it's a joke.) I moved to PA from KS and had to spend a lot of business time in NJ for a while. I've never made such a fool of myself anywhere else. Now the roads here are just paved deer paths, so it's not like they make any sense either. Give me the great plains where the roads are set out in SQUARES, thank you. Miss a left? Take three rights. See an interesting building? Drive toward it, the road will not turn around and go the opposite direction. Sigh. Guess I'm homesick again.


A good question is never answered. It is not a bolt to be tightened into place but a seed to be planted and to bear more seed toward the hope of greening the landscape of the idea. John Ciardi
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
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Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
I hear ya, Stan. I've never been to the plains states, but most of the southwestern US is the same way. Nice and Cartesian. How do I get from A to B? It's enough to know that it's X blocks east and Y blocks north. It doesn't really matter what order you choose to go in each direction; you'll arrive there just as easily just about any way you choose to do it. Iremember that as a kid (in Salt Lake City(, when I first learned what a magnetic compass was, I couldn't understand why anyone would need it. I mean, anywhere I went, it was obvious which way was north. The big mountains were generally to the east, and as long as you knew approximately which way north was, every street you ever saw made it really obvious exactly which way it had to be. I was convinced that humans must have an innate understanding of where North was; I couldn't understand why it was even an issue. Eventually I moved to a small town in Arizona, and spent a lot of time where the roads were either (a) mandom and meandering, or (b) nonexistant - so I learned I had been in error. But eventally I returned to cities, and felt right at home again. Lived in the bay area for a while; very frustrating to navigate. Now I'm in Colorado; it's almost like home.


"I'm not back." - Bill Harding, Twister
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Boston is the worst city to drive in. The New England expression, "You can't get there from here," is true for Boston. Roads don't seem to have any particular destination, they change names randomly, and they suddenly become one way roads going in the other direction. If ever a city road system was designed to get people to use public transporation it is Boston.


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Michael Ernest
High Plains Drifter
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 25, 2000
Posts: 7292

Remembering now my first trip out to Burlington from Logan. No problem finding the Sumner tunnel on the way, but damned if it was where I left it on the way back....
Shashank Tanksali
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Joined: Feb 21, 2001
Posts: 122
I think the privilege of being the worst motorable city goes to San Francisco. With it's bumper to bumper traffic and 60 degree roads, you have a portion of a split second to take your leg off the brake and put it on the accelerator. However, every time the traffic signal turns green, you can move only about 6 inches. If you can drive in San Fran (esp Lombard Street), then you can drive anywhere on earth.

Also parking in San Fran on weekdays is only for powerball winners from other states and dot com millionaires who were smart enough to make hay in 1999 and 2000.
Joe King
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Joined: Sep 02, 2003
Posts: 820
Wow. You'd find driving in the UK a bit interesting - there's only one place in the entire country that is laid out in a grid (Milton Keynes AKA Skanville). Everywhere else the roads pretty much follow the routes that cows used to take to the river two thousand years before. I heard of several people being asked by American tourists how many blocks away things were, and then having to explain that its not quite that simple! What also confuses a lot of people is that there is a difference between a route and a road here. A road labelled on a map as being a particular route e.g. the A212 actually is actually made up of several different roads with different names (and sometimes changes mid road). Sometimes its not also a single route - there's a roundabout near me where all four exits are labelled as being the A2. Talking of roundabouts, I heard that they are extremely rare in the states. Is that true? If so, how on earth do you work out how to use them the first time you see one?!
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
Originally posted by Joe King:
Talking of roundabouts, I heard that they are extremely rare in the states. Is that true? If so, how on earth do you work out how to use them the first time you see one?!
It is true that they are rare in the US. Most cases of missing persons are actually Americans trapped in British roundabouts.
Pradeep bhatt
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Joined: Feb 27, 2002
Posts: 8919

Originally posted by Thomas Paul:
It is true that they are rare in the US. Most cases of missing persons are actually Americans trapped in British roundabouts.


Thomas,

What are you doing at this hour? :roll:


Groovy
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
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Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
Roundabouts are rare in the US ... but not in New Jersey! See what I mean! Criminally insane! And we haven't even started in the jug handle!

Ok, nap time.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Joined: May 05, 2000
Posts: 13974
In NJ if you want to make a left turn you have to make a right turn. This means that you get situations where people from outside of NJ are shooting across 3 lanes of traffic because they suddenly realize you can't make a left to go left.
Damien Howard
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Joined: Apr 01, 2003
Posts: 456
Originally posted by Thomas Paul:
In NJ if you want to make a left turn you have to make a right turn. This means that you get situations where people from outside of NJ are shooting across 3 lanes of traffic because they suddenly realize you can't make a left to go left.


I like this better. If there are too many cars the lanes get backed up. By taking a jug handle this avoid this problem. In california, Davis area, both exist so you never know whether to go left or right. Also I-80 by Sacramento is very confusing, it splits like 100 times.
Don Stadler
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Joined: Feb 10, 2004
Posts: 451
Originally posted by Thomas Paul:
In NJ if you want to make a left turn you have to make a right turn. This means that you get situations where people from outside of NJ are shooting across 3 lanes of traffic because they suddenly realize you can't make a left to go left.


It's also a revenue source from all the traffic tickets paid by out of staters and even residents who momentarily forget...

New Jersey roads are horrible but they're more than matched by the drivers. I used to see things weekly which made me shiver. The worst was being passed in the *middle* lane of a 2-lane highway. A densely-packed highway doing 45 mph! Maybe 3 inches on either side. I figure the maniac took a 10% risk of a major accident to gain a car length! I've also had Joisy drivers hang a U in front of me at an intersection and glue themselves to my bumper horn-blaring for 10 miles when I was doing the speed limit....
Warren Dew
blacksmith
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Joined: Mar 04, 2004
Posts: 1332
    
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Don Stadler:

It's also a revenue source from all the traffic tickets paid by out of staters and even residents who momentarily forget...

You mean it's illegal to shoot across three lanes of traffic at the last minute in New Jersey?

Fortunately for those of us from Massachusetts, we're more likely to just stay in the left lane and simply turn right from it.
Shashank Tanksali
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Joined: Feb 21, 2001
Posts: 122
What on earth is a Turnpike on NJ highways ?
Damien Howard
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Joined: Apr 01, 2003
Posts: 456
Originally posted by Shashank Tanksali:
What on earth is a Turnpike on NJ highways ?


It is not a Turnpike, it is the turnpike

It is the stretch of I-95 that goes through NJ
Joe King
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Joined: Sep 02, 2003
Posts: 820
Pah! You haven't seen anything until you try and navigate through Bournemouth in England. The place is a kind of roundabout twighlight zone. You go in there and it takes hours to get back out again... one of those nightmare places where you go around 50 roundabouts and suddenly reaslise that you've arrived back at the place you started.....
 
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subject: driving on New Jersey highways