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How to handle persistent data for desktop apps

 
Alejandro Pedraza
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Howdy,

I'm thinking about starting a swing app and I was wondering how to handle the data. I'm familiar with server-side relational DBs, but I'd like to know if you guys can recommend something light for the desktop, that I could redistribute with my app and that wouldn't need any extra config. I've read about SQLLite, which also stores everything in a single file, which is good.

Or perhaps an RDBMS is not an appropriate choice here? How do small swing apps usually handle persistent data?

Thanks,
Alejandro
 
Daniel Gagnon
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Plain text files?

If it's small enough, it can be all that's necessary.
 
Kaydell Leavitt
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First of all, SQLLite is spelled wrong. The correct spelling is "SQLite". This is important if you want to find the web-site. I know this because I made the same mistake.

I'm trying out Derby which is also an open-source database. It seems like Derby is easy to install and configure and I think that it has more features than SQLite.

-- Kaydell
 
Alejandro Pedraza
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Looks like Derby is what I'm looking for. Thanks for the advice
 
Kaydell Leavitt
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I remember now that I didn't like SQLite because, although the SQL seemed to be standard (remembering that there isn't really a standard SQL) a lot of the SQL keywords either didn't do anything or they did something other than what you would expect.

I believe that no matter how you declared a field type, all of the fields were the same, and some of the SQL keywords could be entered into your CREATE TABLE statement, but they wouldn't do anything.

So SQLite was kinda compatible with SQL, but it didn't really do what you would think.

Click here to go to the Derby Database web-site

-- Kaydell
[ December 07, 2006: Message edited by: Kaydell Leavitt ]
 
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