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Getting Certified

rachael carr
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 23, 2007
Posts: 1
I have the sierra book, its over facing and although good - reading from cover to cover for certification and learning the language all at once - how likely???!!!
Considering TigerTamer - what do you think and wnat advice can you offer me please/
Thanks
Svend Rost
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 23, 2002
Posts: 904
Their book is good, and I strongly suggest that you read it (from cover to cover) if your planing on taking the SCJP exam. Write lots of code while you are reading it - it's through the process of preparing to the exam that you gain most. The paper in it self is (in my opinion) not that important.

I dont know anything about taming tigers - so I cant help you there

/Svend
Jeff Mayer
Greenhorn

Joined: Mar 21, 2007
Posts: 9
Originally posted by rachael carr:
I have the sierra book, its over facing and although good - reading from cover to cover for certification and learning the language all at once - how likely???!!!

Why not? It's a very good book, that will help you not just to get certified, but also to effectively learn and understand many (somewhat obscure) aspects of the Java language, in a very easy-to-read and pleasant way.

The only book that I had (partially) read before buying Sierra/Bates SCJP book was Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in Java". Years later, these two books are still the only J2SE programming books I've ever read. And Sierra/Bates is the only J2SE programming book that I read "from cover to cover", and I did it twice.

Fortunately (or not ), I can learn a lot only from reading, I don't really need very much hands-on experimentation.
marc weber
Sheriff

Joined: Aug 31, 2004
Posts: 11343

The books mentioned above are top notch.

I would also mention Head First Java as an excellent intro book. I wish it had been available when I started Java! Also, the online Java Tutorials can be quite helpful.


"We're kind of on the level of crossword puzzle writers... And no one ever goes to them and gives them an award." ~Joe Strummer
sscce.org
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
 
subject: Getting Certified
 
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