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dang tasty easy dessert

Jessica Sant
Sheriff

Joined: Oct 17, 2001
Posts: 4313

So I made this DANG tasty and very easy to make dessert last night:

I found it on the Food Network's website, the cook is Rachael Ray (she has this show called 30 minute meals -- where in theory you can make the whole meal in 30 minutes, but I'm just way too slow to do it that quick).

Anyway... if you like berries as much as I do -- here's your next favorite dessert:

Berry-Mi-Su (get it? like Tiramisu, but with berries)
Just to tempt you -- here's the ingredients:
  • Fresh Strawberries
  • Fresh Blackberries
  • Frozen Raspberries (this way you can use the juice from the raspberries easily)
  • Marscopone cheese
  • Heavy Cream
  • Powdered Sugar
  • Lady Fingers (little cake things shaped like fingers)
  • 4 Martini glasses
  • Helen Thomas
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jan 13, 2004
    Posts: 1759
    This recipe is very similar to that for a trifle.Substitute Ammeretti biscuits or Macaroons for the Lady fingers.
    Chances are what you call a macaroon isn't one.


    Le Cafe Mouse - Helen's musings on the web - Java Skills and Thrills
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    Madhav Lakkapragada
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2000
    Posts: 5040
    Berry-Mi-Su (get it? like Tiramisu, but with berries)
    How can you compare Berry thing with Tiramisu :roll: .
    I wouldn't agree to that comparision....

    - m
    Madhav Lakkapragada
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2000
    Posts: 5040
    [Hijack alert....]

    Jess,

    Is Heavy Cream same as Evaporated Milk or Condensed Milk. I was searching for this a couple of times but couldn't find. The only think I found was Whipp Cream, which is not what I want.
    Thanks.

    - m
    Damien Howard
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Apr 01, 2003
    Posts: 456
    Originally posted by Madhav Lakkapragada:
    [Hijack alert....]

    Jess,

    Is Heavy Cream same as Evaporated Milk or Condensed Milk. I was searching for this a couple of times but couldn't find. The only think I found was Whipp Cream, which is not what I want.
    Thanks.

    - m


    No it is different. Can usually be found near the milk (fresh kind not canned)
    Madhav Lakkapragada
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2000
    Posts: 5040
    Is there a brand name that's famous for Heavy Cream?
    The grocery store kids (Diary Dept), kinda throw a blank face...and often point me to the Condensed Milk isle!

    - m
    Jessica Sant
    Sheriff

    Joined: Oct 17, 2001
    Posts: 4313

    like Damien said -- I found it in the milk / dairy section, next to the "light cream" and "half and half" -- it may say "heavy whipping cream" -- but its not "whipped cream"

    (btw -- it has the comparison to Tiramisu, because some of the main ingredients of Tiramisu are Marscopone cheese, heavy cream and Lady fingers)
    Mark Spritzler
    ranger
    Sheriff

    Joined: Feb 05, 2001
    Posts: 17250
        
        6

    I found it on the Food Network's website, the cook is Rachael Ray


    We watch her show almost everyday. She makes great meals and they do take only 30 minutes, if you can hold 12 bottles, cans, bowls, etc at one time.

    She is also lots of fun to watch.

    Mark


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    Alan Wanwierd
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 30, 2004
    Posts: 624
    Originally posted by Madhav Lakkapragada:
    Is Heavy Cream same as Evaporated Milk or Condensed Milk. I was searching for this a couple of times but couldn't find. The only think I found was Whipp Cream, which is not what I want.
    Thanks.

    - m


    I've never heard of 'heavy' cream!!! Where does it sit on this scale of dairy products?:

    1) Skimmed milk(a.k.a "Girly Milk" - or "Water with a bit of white food dye added")
    2) Milk
    3) Single cream
    4) Double cream (a.k.a Whipping cream)
    5) Clotted cream (yellower and really chunky)
    6) Creme Freche
    7) Sour Cream
    8) Cream Cheese
    9) Full-on no doubt about it mature cheddar cheese!
    [ November 16, 2004: Message edited by: Adrian Wallace ]
    Richard Hawkes
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jan 28, 2003
    Posts: 1340
    Heavy and light are US names for cream types. In the UK it's be single and double. Double is richer than heavy though, so you would have to add some milk to double to make it less heavy and, therefore, more like heavy.
    Ernest Friedman-Hill
    author and iconoclast
    Marshal

    Joined: Jul 08, 2003
    Posts: 24183
        
      34

    Adrian's list is interesting. In the US we've got

    Skim milk
    1% Milk
    2% Milk
    Whole Milk (3% milk?)
    Table cream
    Light cream
    Heavy (aka whipping) cream
    Sour cream

    Clotted cream is nowhere to be found. And if I make a recipe that calls for Creme Fraiche I'm often forced to use sour cream instead.

    But why do we have 4 kinds of milk whereas Adrian's got to suffer along with only two?


    [Jess in Action][AskingGoodQuestions]
    Alan Wanwierd
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 30, 2004
    Posts: 624
    Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
    But why do we have 4 kinds of milk whereas Adrian's got to suffer along with only two?


    Actually the milk trade has grown over the years. When I was growing up it was:

    silver-top (normal)
    gold-top (really creamy)
    ..this was in the days when the milk arrived in a glass bottle on your doorstep every morning and was sealed by a foil lid (either silver or gold in colour).. of course if you werent in when the milk was delivered the blue-tits would get to it and peck their way through the caps to get to the milk.

    Then the health freaks kicked in and we got:
    skimmed
    semi-skimmed
    regular (formerly silver-top)
    ..(at this stage gold-top milk ceased to be available - milk deliveies stopped and everyone started getting their milk in cardboard tetra-packs from the supermarket... presumably the blue-tits either found an alternative source of nutrition, or have suffered a mass extinction!)

    and now theres:
    skimmed
    semi-skimmed
    full-fat
    full fat homogenised
    semi-skimmed with added calium
    semi-skimmed with extra omega-3's....
    and al sorts fo perculiarly engineered varieties for people with aledged fashionable food allergies/intollerances such as soy milk (a.k.a The devils own sputum!), lactose free milk (what??) and all sorts of other perculair varieties that I cant make any sense of...


    ..Interesting that you suggest I "suffer" with only 2 types of milk.. I'd much rather return to the days when milk was just milk.... (gold-top was very rare)... I hate these tricky decisions!!! How much simpler would life be if we werent faced with such an apalling number of choices for every tiny detail of our lives?
    Ernest Friedman-Hill
    author and iconoclast
    Marshal

    Joined: Jul 08, 2003
    Posts: 24183
        
      34

    Originally posted by Adrian Wallace:

    ..Interesting that you suggest I "suffer" with only 2 types of milk.. I'd much rather return to the days when milk was just milk....


    Yeah, I was just kidding. I understand why there are skim and whole, and I could be persuaded that there's a use for something in-between for people who want to cut down on fat but can't live without a little bit, but I'm utterly flummoxed by the 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% thing. Are there really people who try both 1% and 2% and carefully weigh their options, then choose between the two?

    We've got calcium-enhanced milk here, too, but all milk is homogenized and pasteurized; I think it's the law. We've also got all kinds of Soy Milk in the dairy case, as well.
    Michael Matola
    whippersnapper
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Mar 25, 2001
    Posts: 1746
        
        2
    EF-H: Clotted cream is nowhere to be found. And if I make a recipe that calls for Creme Fraiche I'm often forced to use sour cream instead.

    Funny. I just noticed both on the dairy shelf of my corner grocery the other day. (And I'm in Michigan for pete's sake.)
    [ November 16, 2004: Message edited by: Michael Matola ]
    fred rosenberger
    lowercase baba
    Bartender

    Joined: Oct 02, 2003
    Posts: 11240
        
      16

    According to my wife, heavy cream is 40% cream. She says she's seen double cream in the U.S. stores. But we nostly shop at a place called "Global Foods" that specialzes in foods from all over the world. They have relatively little "american" food.


    There are only two hard things in computer science: cache invalidation, naming things, and off-by-one errors
    Madhav Lakkapragada
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2000
    Posts: 5040
    Originally posted by Jessica Sant:
    like Damien said -- I found it in the milk / dairy section, next to the "light cream" and "half and half" -- it may say "heavy whipping cream" -- but its not "whipped cream"


    ummm...Thanks, I think I saw that, but assumed it was different (well whipped cream in a box).

    Originally posted by Jessica Sant:

    (btw -- it has the comparison to Tiramisu, because some of the main ingredients of Tiramisu are Marscopone cheese, heavy cream and Lady fingers)


    Seems like your comparision is based on the ingredients and I based my comparision on the looks and taste. I guess I can agree.

    - m
    Pat Davis
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Nov 08, 2004
    Posts: 47
    speaking of dessert, i just bought two cheesecakes this morning for my colleagues, for thanksgiving. they costs me $25, if you ask me how to make them, i don't have slightest idea! but hey, if you look at the gradient: butter, cheese, milk, egg, sugger,...there is no wrong way to eat it!


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    Madhav Lakkapragada
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2000
    Posts: 5040
    i just bought two cheesecakes this morning for my colleagues
    Damn, why am I not working with you, atleast for today?

    - m
    Sania Marsh
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jul 12, 2004
    Posts: 469
    Talking about desserts...
    Does anyone have easy reciepe for Carrot Halva?
    I don't like it heavy, I've seen many peple put heavy cream - it is just impossible to eat.

    To cut the cooking time, I tried to use evaporated milk (not condenced), it was faster, but I still overcooked the carrots - they became mushy.
    My friend used to make bright red halva that looked like candy - it was soo delisious, but I cannot make it like that. I tried so many different ways, but it never comes out like hers.

    Maybe anyone here can help?
    kayal cox
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Aug 19, 2004
    Posts: 376
    This is the way I make carrot halwa. But you seem to have a very high standard, so it might fall short

    I don't know specific measurements, I just go by the taste and feel while cooking..

    carrots
    condensed milk
    milk
    a tablespoon or two of ghee (clarified butter)
    unroasted nuts (cashews, pistachios, almonds, and one other nut that I forgot the name for)
    couple of cubes of panneer (I think it is called cottage cheese, but I have used only the ones available in ethnic stores)
    Sugar to taste(if not using condensed milk)

    Grate carrots coarsely. Heat ghee in pan. saute the carrots for just a couple of minutes, till they are coated with ghee, and start to turn color. Add milk, condensed milk, and nuts (the nuts should be split into small pieces).
    Cover and let the nuts and carrot boil in the milk for a few minutes. Then just keep turning till the milk evaporates and you get the desired consistency. Crumble the panneer into very small pieces and add it to the halwa. Cook on low-medium heat, and stir frequently, so it doesn't get burnt at the bottom.
    Serve warm or chilled. Enjoy!
    Madhav Lakkapragada
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jun 03, 2000
    Posts: 5040
    My friend used to make bright red halva that looked like candy - it was soo delisious, but I cannot make it like that. I tried so many different ways, but it never comes out like hers.

    For me, its not about how it looks...I ask just one simple question -

    Is it sweet?

    Makes life simple...

    - m
    Sania Marsh
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Jul 12, 2004
    Posts: 469
    Heat ghee in pan. saute the carrots for just a couple of minutes, till they are coated with ghee, and start to turn color.

    Fry carrots before boiling... that wasn't in any reciepe I tried, maybe that's the secret...
    Nick George
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Apr 04, 2004
    Posts: 815
    Aren't 1% and whole milk the same?


    I've heard it takes forever to grow a woman from the ground
    Ernest Friedman-Hill
    author and iconoclast
    Marshal

    Joined: Jul 08, 2003
    Posts: 24183
        
      34

    Originally posted by Nick George:
    Aren't 1% and whole milk the same?


    Aaak, no! Whole milk is 3-4%. 1% is almost-skim.
    Nick George
    Ranch Hand

    Joined: Apr 04, 2004
    Posts: 815
    I'll be damned... I thought it went Skim, 2%, 1%. You have no idea how much confusion this caused me all throughout my young childhood.
     
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