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What kind of tea would you like sir?

Gerald Davis
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 872
When I was shopping up Oxford street to day, thought that I would go to borders book shop and read out a couple of car mags and buy a cup of tea. When was ordering a cup of tea , a slim pretty young eastern Europeans behind the counter asks me what kind of tea would you like sir. Regular ordinary tea I said, but she doesn't know what tea I meant nor did anyone else there, so I ordered a tea that I thought was regular tea, Earlgray, boy! that tea tasted so manky it was unbelievable.

I am just a simple working class folk, I don't know anything about posh tea's or no mocha latay cappuccino. I just have tee or coffee with milk and too two sugars. Does anyone know what kind of tea I should have ordered.
Jeroen Wenting
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Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
Oh blimey, a commoner in a Tea Salon. Can't have that.

I prefer Earl Grey myself, or else Chinese green tea.


42
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:

I prefer Earl Grey myself, or else Chinese green tea.


I don't think they serve green tea in bookshops, Chinese or otherwise.
To be really posh ask for Clippers Organic Tea or Coffee( not really posh - you can buy them from Asda but at least that sort of defines you to them).
Here are some interesting facts I bet you didn't know:
http://www.oilzine.com/features/features_details.asp?ID=55

Where would we be without a nice cup of tea?

Tea plays such an important part in our lives, that it's impossible to imagine life before Tea.

1) Tea was discovered by accident, over 5.000 years ago, by the Chinese Emperor, Shen Nong, when a leaf fell into a pot of drinking water that he was boiling.

2) Early American settlers used Tea as money in the 1800's. The floods of 1830 were the first financial black Tuesday.

3) The Queen drinks nearly 5000 cups of tea per year - the same as an African Elephant drinks in three years!

4) Clippers, the ships used for tea transportation, were regularly raced across the oceans, culminating in a breath-taking finale up the Thames.

5) Earl Grey tea is made from the shavings of the Earl Grey family. What's left over goes into scented bath products.

6) Coffee is actually watered down Tea. Mud is actually watered down coffee, just solidified.

7) The Beatles nearly ruined their career when John Lennon exclaimed "We're bigger than Tea."

lovely cup of tea

8) Oasis copied the Beatles in the 1990's and tea was a favourite of the Gallagher Brothers. "F*cking Mad for it" exclaimed Liam when asked if he wanted a cup of tea

9) In the 1950's Tea was banned in five American counties, after a breakout of "Tea Sniffing" struck the country. Famous "Tea Sniffers" include Ronald Reagan, Lord Charles and that guy from TV with spiky hair who cooks

10) Tea bags were originally made from the sails of old ships run aground & fermented.

11) Money needed to maintain Tea production resulted in the Opium wars, with British fighting for the right to sell opium in China, undisturbed.

12) The editor of Vogue once fired a large number of female secretarial workers for "wasting their time at tea dances".
look for the Clipper logo

Why not try one of Clipper's lovely new brews?

Clipper have boldly gone where no tea company has gone before, and harnessed the ancient Indian powers of Ayurveda. Madonna, Cindi Crawford, and Goldie Hawn all practice Ayurveda, which aims to maintain and balance the energy and health of mind and body.

Under the guidance of a registered Ayurvedic Yogi Practitioner, Clipper has formulated the Ayurvedic range, specifically to stimulate, calm or detox.

Clipper Organic Ayurvedic Stimulating Tea has the refreshing taste of black tea enhanced with the rich perfume of rose and warm, fragrant hints of cinnamon and coriander to exhilarate the senses. Believed to balance the Pitta Dosha (comparable to fire) trend in Ayurveda.

Clipper Organic Ayurvedic Calming Tea, brightly coloured with soft, soothing notes of Green Tea and natural jasmine, believed to balanced the Vata Dosha (comparable to air) trend in Ayurveda

Clipper Organic Ayurvedic Detox Infusion is a crisp tasting, lively balance of rosemary, ginger, oregano, turmeric, aloe vera and lime, believed to balance the Kapha Dosha (comparable to earth) trend in Ayerveda.

Look out for these tantalising teas in independent health food stores and selected Waitrose supermarkets costing �1.99 and you too can be like Madonna, Cindi Crawford and Goldie Hawn, enjoying a graceful, harmonious and vigorous life.

Clipper Organic Fruit Teas

Clipper have launched four aromatic, refreshing Organic Fruit Teas, all benefiting from having no artificial flavours.

Clipper's Organic Orange and Coconut, Organic Red Fruits, Organic Lemon & Ginger and Organic Wild Berry share the natural sweet taste of real fruit, with a hint of spice, ready to dance on the palate, and they're all free from caffeine and chemicals too

Only �1.49 for 20 teabags and packaged in unbleached paper with totally biodegradable packaging, these organic fruit teas are as good for the environment as they are to the tastebuds. Available at all good independent health food stores and Sainsbury's, Asda and Tesco look out for the Clipper logo and enjoy fruit teas with a real fruit taste.

look for the Fairtrade logo


Check out www.clipper-teas.com

Check out www.fairtrade.org

Some Unusual things to do with Tea

1) Making new paper look old

When I was doing a project in high school, I found a great way to make new paper look old using Stash black tea. Take some white paper of your desired thickness, and tear off the rim so that it's jagged and worn looking. The paper can be crinkled a bit for added efect. Then get yourself a cup of hot water to dip a tea bag (or two) into. Dip a fresh teabag in the hot water, and run it along the paper. ( I like to use gloves because the tea can stain my fingers ). Blotting on edges and in random areas adds character too. Let the paper dry, and add your designs! This tea-bagging can be done a few times to the same piece of paper, depending on how old you want it to look. This is a fun idea for treasure maps, birthday invitations, and for poetry gifts.
Rea Kapler Calgary, Alberta, Canada

2) Tea and Greeting Cards

To whom it may concern. Hello, this is what I do with your tea bags. I like it. I make greeting cards.

optical illusion
Mrs. Aria Buitenhuis Kakabeka Falls, Ontario


[ December 14, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]

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Gerald Davis
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 872
Most modern big bookshops in the westend have a cafe area like starbucks. You can read books in the cafe area then, then put it back on shelf after.

I don't want a lecture on the history of tea, I want to know what kind of tea regular tea is called, you know! the tetly and typho's teas that are served in all greasy spoons.
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
I believe that was not a lecture just a send up of tea.

Horizons ? broaden ? Perhaps the next time you visit a greasy spoon cafe ask them to read what's on the box. It is probably Tetley or Typhoo or Brook Bond or Lipton....
[ December 14, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
Alan Wanwierd
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Joined: Jun 30, 2004
Posts: 624
Originally posted by Gerald Davis:
Most modern big bookshops in the westend have a cafe area like starbucks. You can read books in the cafe area then, then put it back on shelf after.

I don't want a lecture on the history of tea, I want to know what kind of tea regular tea is called, you know! the tetly and typho's teas that are served in all greasy spoons.



"English Breakfast" Tea...
or perhaps
"Ceylon" Tea....

That should be the term you want for general run-of-the-mill ordinary tea (I think)
Tina Desai
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Joined: Mar 13, 2003
Posts: 365
I generally check what they are serving under that name. When such coffee shops opened in my country, I used to read the board - check which one has coffee, milk, sugar for sure and then order that.

If they dont have a board, tell them you need something with these ingredients. If you like it, ask the name!! If you think you should have some more milk - next time order, 'name she tells' with extra milk!!

Tina


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peter wooster
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Joined: Jun 13, 2004
Posts: 1033
Originally posted by Gerald Davis:
so I ordered a tea that I thought was regular tea, Earlgray, boy! that tea tasted so manky it was unbelievable.


Earl Grey tea is just ordinary tea dolled up with a bergamot flavoring. An descendent of its inventor gave Canada the Grey Cup, a football trophy, usually filled with something more potent than tea.

I personally don't like Earl Grey tea much, it tastes like perfume smells. I prefer good quality ordinary tea, such as "orange pekoe" quality tea from Ceylon (Sri Lanka) or Darjeeling. Twinings Ceylon Breakfast is a good choice in a pseudo-snooty shop.

Chinese teas are quite different, not all are green, for another surprise from that origin, you could try Lapsang Souchong, just say its an aquired taste, like single malt scotch.
soumya ravindranath
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Joined: Jan 26, 2001
Posts: 300
The only thing I prefer to think of as 'tea' is black tea, whatever brand it is, here in Germany.
I took some time to learn that any bag that's dipped in boiling water (sometimes just hot water) is a 'tea' bag here. So when I would ask for 'tea', they asked me to pick up one from a list of (orally) 10 or so names (not brands; like fenchel, peppermint etc.) which we, in India consider medicine to be had when one was sick
Gerald Davis
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 872
So ordinary tea is English Breakfast.
Jeroen Wenting
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Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
6) Coffee is actually watered down Tea. Mud is actually watered down coffee, just solidified.


I knew it!

The only thing I prefer to think of as 'tea' is black tea, whatever brand it is, here in Germany.


Most teas are considered black, even many of those that aren't
Green tea is dried using a different process, retaining more of the potency of the tea leaves.
It's also usually cut less fine, or even used as whole leaves instead of (nearly) powdered so no bag is needed (just a net).

I agree that all those fancy flavours are simply not done.
At most I fancy some lemon juice in my tea, otherwise it's to be consumed without any additives (that also means no milk or sugar, especially milk being an invention of the uncultured British barbarians).
soumya ravindranath
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Joined: Jan 26, 2001
Posts: 300
I won't forget ever the way my non-Indian friend called out to her husband while visiting us - "hey!!! you have to see this, Soumya is making tea!".

This is how we make tea - for 2 cups of tea, boil one cup of water and add 2 spoonful tea (black ) leaf, when the concoction turns a pretty brownish red, add a cup of thick milk and continue boiling till the whole thing turns kind of brown-red. Add sugar while it boils or later before you drink it, choice is yours
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
In England, tea is never, never boiled.

Boil water and pour in teapot. Add tea leaves and cover with a tea cosy. Then start putting your cups and cakes out. Pour tepid milk into a milk jug. And serve.

I do make tea in the microwave sometimes and add tea leaves to the cup. They sink to the bottom. How else would you get to read tea leaves?
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:

(that also means no milk or sugar, especially milk being an invention of the uncultured British barbarians).


Yes, I think the Brits were the first to start adding milk to tea.

From a BNP website : ( British National Party)

"Odin's Eye - The BNP rulebook states "members must pour the milk in first" We have rules for a reason, darlin' We're in this to WIN. That means milk first, tea second. And no stirring. There's enough stirrers here already :clink"
[ December 15, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
Gerald Davis
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 872
Originally posted by Helen Thomas:


Yes, I think the Brits were the first to start adding milk to tea.

From a BNP website : ( British National Party)

"Odin's Eye - The BNP rulebook states "members must pour the milk in first" We have rules for a reason, darlin' We're in this to WIN. That means milk first, tea second. And no stirring. There's enough stirrers here already :clink"

[ December 15, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]


In Starbucks they put the milk in first, then they expect you to pay �1.30 for it
Gerald Davis
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Joined: May 15, 2002
Posts: 872
Originally posted by Helen Thomas:


Yes, I think the Brits were the first to start adding milk to tea.

From a BNP website : ( British National Party)

"Odin's Eye - The BNP rulebook states "members must pour the milk in first" We have rules for a reason, darlin' We're in this to WIN. That means milk first, tea second. And no stirring. There's enough stirrers here already :clink"

[ December 15, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
Marcus Green
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Joined: Sep 14, 1999
Posts: 2813
Its very nice of Jeroen to suggest it, but the British did not invent milk at all, it is just one of those things that comes with cows without any human intervention.


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Jeroen Wenting
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Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
I didn't say the English invented milk, just the combination of milk and tea

The proper temperature for water for making tea is 80 degrees Celsius.
Ellen Zhao
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Joined: Sep 17, 2002
Posts: 581
Jeroen you have to tell how you deal with the Chinese green tea here. Just to make sure you are not _abusing_ this holy creature...

The proper temperatures for deferent tea leaves are different! At this point you've been horribly wrong...
Jayesh Lalwani
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Joined: Nov 05, 2004
Posts: 502
Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
In England, tea is never, never boiled.

Boil water and pour in teapot. Add tea leaves and cover with a tea cosy. Then start putting your cups and cakes out. Pour tepid milk into a milk jug. And serve.

I do make tea in the microwave sometimes and add tea leaves to the cup. They sink to the bottom. How else would you get to read tea leaves?


Ahh!!! then you have never enjoyed "kadak" tea, which is quite popular in Bombay. You keep boiling tea till the entire neighborhood can smell the aroma. Then, after all of them have arrived at your house, you add the milk Quite invorigating!!
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
It's what we sometimes do with coffee in the morning.

Boil grounds in a percolator till the smell wakes everyone up. Invigorating ,as you say, around 10 am on a weekend. Till the neighbourhood arives ? I don't think so.
Jayesh Lalwani
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Joined: Nov 05, 2004
Posts: 502
I guess coffee will burn if you cook it too much. But, boiling tea leaves on medium heat just makes the tea stronger (There's a limit, obviously)

And yeah, neighborhood was an exaggerration. More like flats adjoining yours.
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
I think it's difficult to burn coffee in a percolator. The water continuously boils up a tiny tube and percolates down through the coffee grounds in the middle. The volume of water doesn't reduce that quickly. A small percolator can be kept on the boil for a couple of hours.

A company that wants to make money by making sure people don't have too many coffee breaks can use these. The coffee aroma is enough to perk the workers up.
[ December 15, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
Jeroen Wenting
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Joined: Oct 12, 2000
Posts: 5093
Haven't been able to find good green tea in years now.
Used to put leaves in a (preheated of course) teapot and slowly pour hot (not boiling!) water over them.
Frank Silbermann
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Joined: Jun 06, 2002
Posts: 1387
The way to make tea is to put some Lipton tea bags in a big glass jar filled with tap water. Place jar outside in the sun for a few hours. Then bring it in, add sugar and refrigerate. Serve with a lemon slice over ice cubes.
Helen Thomas
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Joined: Jan 13, 2004
Posts: 1759
Let's guess. Frank lives in the Arizona Desert.
Axel Janssen
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Posts: 2164
... or in Scandinavia and he likes ice tea.
Helen Thomas
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Posts: 1759
Bookstores are the place to pull

Who'd have guessed?
Ellen Zhao
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Joined: Sep 17, 2002
Posts: 581
Jereon, I have some top class Chinese green tea with me in my dorm, maybe I can bring it to you if I visit Amsterdam in my winter break. Cheers.
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Posts: 13974
I used to like Darjeeling. Now I only drink coffee. I like coffee from Indonesia. My favorite has the tag line "Earthy and Aromatic". The young lady at the coffee shop explained that means that it tastes like dirt and stinks.


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