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Applauding on international or domestic flights

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Sheriff

Joined: Aug 26, 2000
Posts: 10065
When my plane Moscow-Seattle landed after 12 hours of flight, the passengers started to applaud. It was about four years ago. I've never seen anything like this since then, and now my friend said he observed the same tradition when he took the same flight last year. I am curious, is it this particular route that is so dangerous, or is it Russian airlines, or ... what? Any similar observations?


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Jesse Torres
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Joined: Mar 25, 2004
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During my trips from states to Seoul or Manila or Taiwan, flight attendants routinely take a bow at the end of the flight. Passengers then clap. I joined the clapping because the service is always exceptional with Korean Airlines and EVA airlines.
[ April 07, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]

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Alan Wanwierd
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I have a feeling applause was given when I landed in Cuzco on a flight from Lima back in '98...

The flight was traumatic for me:

We got up and left our hostel in central Lima at some ridiculously early time in the morning to give us plenty of time to get to the airport, we wandered the deserted streets for a while looking in vain for a taxi until we eventually managed to flag down a guy in a rusted out VW beetle. We climbed in and he did his best to get to the airport despite the inside of teh car being full of exhaust fumes and the brakes clearly not working at all (which very nearly led to our demise at one set of traffic lights). Eventually we got to the airrport with plenty of time to spare and checked in all our stuff. We were feeling confident and happy now that we had boarding passses and seemed reasonably sure that the flight was going to actually happen and we did have seats! - All we had to do was wait a couple of hours to see what gate to board at... So we sat... and listened... and watched the screens.... theres was no mention of our flight on the screens, and announcements were all in spanish - but we listened out for any details we could make out (we could just about communicate what we needed to in broken spanish - but listening to garbled PA announcements was a real test).... After several hours (we knew these flights had a reputation for being unreliable and very delayed, so we were prepared for a wait) we heard our flight number mentioned on an announcement so decided to move towards the boarding gates in the hope of getting more information. We found a gate with our flight number marked up on it and loads of people standing around - so once again we settled believing that things must be OK...
A couple of minutes later a life-saving German gentleman approached me and said "Are you Adrian? Trying to get to Cuzco? - I think they've been calling your name over the PA system for the last 15 minutes!". We stood up and approached the desk where staff were looking busy. They looked at us grabbed our boarding passes and pointed out the door at a plane, montioning us to run! We sprinted to the plane lept up the stairs and the stewardess slammed the door shut behind us immediately. I swear the plane was taxiing toward the runway before we had a chance to sit down!

So - like I said at the beginning of this post I *think* the pilot was applauded for landing at Cuzco, but its not what I remember most about that journey! - Moral of the story - if you dont understand the system and arent good at the local language in a strange airport KEEP ASKING WHATS GOING ON!!!
Jeroen Wenting
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It happens on a lot of charter flights as well.

I and (from what I hear in talking to them) many pilots consider it an insult.
Apparently the passengers didn't expect the crew to be able to do their job and get the aircraft on the ground safely...

Maybe in Russia that's indeed the case (or am I being too sarcastic here ), but in Europe it's mainly because people are not used to flying (especially the typical charter passenger) and are more than a bit afraid (all the shows about aircraft crashes that are aired every spring on TV don't help...) and it's a show of relief on their part.


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Ashok Mash
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I have noticed this often with international flights � all the Brits in Delhi-Heathrow flight applauds when it touch down at Heathrow, same with and the French on a Bombay-Paris flight. Now if you think that�s because they are happy to get out of India, wait for this, every time (well, almost) a flight lands in Bombay or Cochin (flying in from Dubai, Kuwait, Colombo, Paris, London) all Indians (well, almost everyone) applauds!

It�s also a form of congratulating the crew the job well done too, I think!


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Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Ashok Mash:

It�s also a form of congratulating the crew the job well done too, I think!


Weird isn't it. Like you didn't think they could do it... If you want to reward them for exceptional service tip generously. While some airlines may have restrictions against accepting tips the gesture alone will say enough.
Ashok Mash
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
If you want to reward them for exceptional service tip generously.


Long haul flights like the ones I mentioned, unlike cheaper regional airlines, do not sell services on board. Basically, everything is paid for when you buy the ticket, and I am yet to come across a �tips jar� on the way out! I could tip my travel agent for booking the ticket, but I don�t think that will get to the flight crew!

I thought applauding is to congratulate, than a sarcastic way of complaining! I could be wrong though!
Axel Janssen
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Russians must have seen the germans and dutch clapping in flights to popular european charter flight destinations like Mallorca or Turkish coast. So they thought that it'ld be good style when landing on a western airport. IT IS NOT.
Do they clap in intra-russian flights? I don't think so.
Maybe they adapted easily because a lot of russians like rythmic things like clapping and dancing. A german-russian collegue told me that participantion in kid-tournaments of dancing (walz, chachacha, foxtrott, etc.) are dominated by russians here (>70%). His son does that.
fred rosenberger
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  16

When parents from the U.S. go abroad to adopt children, an interesting thing happens (there are a few asumptions here, but this is basically correct).

1) The parents adopt the child according to the local countries laws. At this point, while the child is officially the parents, they are still citizens of their birth country.

2) The child must get a passport from their country of birth.

3) The child must apply for a U.S. visa to enter the U.S., as they are still not U.S. citizens.

4) The parents can get on the (in my case) China->U.S flight as U.S. Citizens ending their visit to China. The child get on the plane as a Chinese citizen, with a Visa to enter the U.S.

5) WHEN THE PLANE'S WHEELS TOUCH THE GROUND in the U.S., the child becomes a U.S. citizen.

So, on flights where there are parents of foreign adopted children, the parents applaud the newly 'citizenized' children.

Russia is a popular place to adopt children, so that may be what happened. To get the visa, you have to go to a consulate office, which very likely is in Moscow...

[ April 08, 2005: Message edited by: fred rosenberger ]
[ April 11, 2005: Message edited by: fred rosenberger ]

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Joe Hepp
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Joined: Feb 07, 2005
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I thought it was done because people were glad to be back home again.

My parents used to beep the car horn when we crossed back into the county we lived in when coming back home from a trip.
Marc Peabody
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When I flew to Germany from the US everyone clapped at each landing except for the final one back in the US. I assumed it was to show gratitude for a smooth landing and great service.


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Jayesh Lalwani
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Originally posted by Ashok Mash:
I have noticed this often with international flights � all the Brits in Delhi-Heathrow flight applauds when it touch down at Heathrow, same with and the French on a Bombay-Paris flight. Now if you think that�s because they are happy to get out of India, wait for this, every time (well, almost) a flight lands in Bombay or Cochin (flying in from Dubai, Kuwait, Colombo, Paris, London) all Indians (well, almost everyone) applauds!

It�s also a form of congratulating the crew the job well done too, I think!


It must be a new thing. I have flown in and out of Bombay numerous times and Bombay-Paris couple of times, and I don't remember anyone applauding. I remember kids making a loud racket because the airlines thought it will be a good idea to serve ice-cream just before landing :roll: OTH, my mother came via Moscow and everybody applauded when the flight landed in NY.
Nick George
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I guess, I'm wondering, should actors be insulted when people clap at the end of a play? Like they couldn't put on a good play?


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Ilja Preuss
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Joined: Jul 11, 2001
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Originally posted by Nick George:
I guess, I'm wondering, should actors be insulted when people clap at the end of a play? Like they couldn't put on a good play?


Well, in Albania, that's actually the case - clapping at the end of the play is considered to be an insult. The right thing to do if the play was good is to just silently leave the theater, as far as I know. Feels really strange...


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Kishore Dandu
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Originally posted by Marc Peabody:
When I flew to Germany from the US everyone clapped at each landing except for the final one back in the US. I assumed it was to show gratitude for a smooth landing and great service.


This is exactly what is observed with landings in Germany. When I asked other passengers they concurred that it is because of nice landing.


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Kishore Dandu
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Originally posted by Jayesh Lalwani:


It must be a new thing. I have flown in and out of Bombay numerous times and Bombay-Paris couple of times, and I don't remember anyone applauding. I remember kids making a loud racket because the airlines thought it will be a good idea to serve ice-cream just before landing :roll: OTH, my mother came via Moscow and everybody applauded when the flight landed in NY.


I completely agree with Jayesh on this. When the planes land in India there is rush to get out, than to applaud anybody.
Kishore Dandu
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Originally posted by Ashok Mash:

It�s also a form of congratulating the crew the job well done too, I think!


If you have tried American Airlines long haul, you would want to do the other way around of applause(ie slapping on the air hostesses faces).
John Dunn
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When I got back from France, whole plane partied for days. We were so happy to be back in the US of A.


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Jayesh Lalwani
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Originally posted by Kishore Dandu:


I completely agree with Jayesh on this. When the planes land in India there is rush to get out, than to applaud anybody.


It's not just India. It's everywhere I have been. Usually, in US, people stand up as soon as the seat-belts lights are on, espescially in the domestic flights. I have flown to Singapore and Malaysia from Bombay, too, and nobody claps.

I always thought that from an ettiquette point of airline services were seen similar to long-distance bus services like Greyhound in US, and ST's in India. You don't applaud your bus driver so you don't applaud your pilot. You don't tip the bus driver, so you don't tip the pilot either.
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Nick George:
I guess, I'm wondering, should actors be insulted when people clap at the end of a play? Like they couldn't put on a good play?


Depends on where you are.
In the Netherlands it's common practice to stand up and applaud the actors, in the UK that's an insult and the applause should be done sitting down.
In other countries again no applause might be appreciated at all.
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Ashok Mash:


Long haul flights like the ones I mentioned, unlike cheaper regional airlines, do not sell services on board. Basically, everything is paid for when you buy the ticket, and I am yet to come across a �tips jar� on the way out! I could tip my travel agent for booking the ticket, but I don�t think that will get to the flight crew!

I thought applauding is to congratulate, than a sarcastic way of complaining! I could be wrong though!


There is no official tip jar, but is there in a tour bus (where it is common practice to tip the driver and guide)?
You'll have had one FA responsible for your section of the aircraft. Approach her and thank her for the service if it was good. Far more personal that way.

Applauding might be considered a congratulation for a job well done by the passengers, but for the pilots it's nothing different from what they do all day.
You're in software engineering I think (why else are you here ), would you like your customers calling you every time you send them a product just to congratulate you on the fact that the installation went well?
Ashok Mash
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
You're in software engineering I think (why else are you here ), would you like your customers calling you every time you send them a product just to congratulate you on the fact that the installation went well?


You guessed it right! Its strange you should mention it, because customer does that all the time � they call us and appreciate the fact that installation went smooth and how its helping them to do things better!! And our marketing department use these happy customers as customer reference for winning more business! I thought this is normal everywhere, it is in India, UK and here in Ireland, and from my limited exposure, in USA too!
Ashok Mash
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Originally posted by Kishore Dandu:
I completely agree with Jayesh on this. When the planes land in India there is rush to get out, than to applaud anybody.


May be then its just us, happy go lucky mallus!

But I have to agree with you, the jumping out of their seats as soon aBut I have to agree with you, the jumping out of their seats as soon as the flight touch down is very frequent, and even more disgusting fact is that they were behaving very well mannered in Heathrow or Paris just a few hours ago! Must be something in the air, some sort of survival instinct, like how the survival instinct of a member of some warrior tribe in the middle of Africa!
Dave Lenton
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
In the Netherlands it's common practice to stand up and applaud the actors, in the UK that's an insult and the applause should be done sitting down.


I've only ever seen standing up applause while watching a play in the UK, but then maybe I've only been to less well cultured locations

It is strange how some gestures and actions, assumed to be universal, can have totally different meanings in different places.

One example is belching - seen as being appreciation of a meal in some countries, and very rude in other countries.

Another example is a minute's silence before a sporting event. When Liverpool (an English football team) played Juventus (an Italian team) recently, there was a minute's silence. The English fans remained totally silent while the Italian fans applauded. Both were obviously being respectful in their own way, but both clearly had different ways of doing this.
[ April 12, 2005: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]

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Jeroen Wenting
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You've never seen people deplane in Europe have you?
What a disaster, I'm surprised every time that noone gets crushed to death in the struggle to be the first out the door.

But people do usually remain seated until they notice the aircraft shutting down at the stand or gate.
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Dave Lenton:

Another example is a minute's silence before a sporting event. When Liverpool (an English football team) played Juventus (an Italian team) recently, there was a minute's silence. The English fans remained totally silent while the Italian fans applauded. Both were obviously being respectful in their own way, but both clearly had different ways of doing this.


what was the silence for? Maybe the Italians were deliberately disrespectful, these are football hooligans after all
Dave Lenton
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Originally posted by Jeroen Wenting:
what was the silence for?


In 1985 Liverpool and Juventus played each other in a cup final in the Belgian Heysel Stadium. The authorities made a bit of a mistake and allocated an area of the stadium as being for neutral fans, but at the same time allowed fans from each club to buy tickets. This was at a time when a lot of European football clubs had problems with violent fans, and sure enough fighting started between the fans. During the scuffles a group of Liverpool fans charged into the Juventus fans, and as they ran away a wall collapsed and 39 people (mostly Juventus fans) died.

The recent game between Liverpool and Juventus was the first time they've met in a competitive match since then, and is also in the year of the 20th anniversary, so the minute's silence was done to remember the people who died.

Maybe the Italians were deliberately disrespectful, these are football hooligans after all


By and large the Italian fans were being respectful. A few of them are still very angry with Liverpool, and showed their disrespect by turning their backs on the pitch and making rude hand gestures. There's a bit of a concern at the moment that there may be some "revenge" attacks by Juventus fans in the upcoming second leg, but hopefully not as most of the fans seemed quite respectful of the remembrance, and Liverpool's attempts to apologise.
[ April 13, 2005: Message edited by: Dave Lenton ]
Colin Cutbush
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Joined: Apr 12, 2005
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The only time I have experienced this phenomenom is on a trip to the states, all the American passengers started applauding. We were bemused by this round of applause - do people take off not expecting to arrive ath their destinations?



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Jeroen Wenting
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some do Collin... An estimated 30% of people have some form of fear of flying. While some of those successfully avoid aircraft most will get onto flights but will be quite afraid and extremely relieved when back on the ground.
Then there's the people who aren't afraid of flying so much as claustrophobic (fear of flying often is linked to claustrophobia, though the loss of control over your destiny also plays part).
Jesse Torres
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Originally posted by Colin Cutbush:
The only time I have experienced this phenomenom is on a trip to the states, all the American passengers started applauding. We were bemused by this round of applause - do people take off not expecting to arrive ath their destinations?



Within the U.S domestically, I've never experienced any rounds of applause. I have noticed that on Asian airliners, passengers typically do applaud the staff for the service.
[ April 13, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]
Ganapathi Srinivasan
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Originally posted by Jesse Torres:


Within the U.S domestically, I've never experienced any rounds of applause. I have noticed that on Asian airliners, passengers typically do applaud the staff for the service.

[ April 13, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]


last winter when I went from NYC to West Palm Beach, everyone applauded when the plane touched down in WPB. (Guess they were too glad to get to a warmer weather!)

Kishore Dandu
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Originally posted by Jesse Torres:


Within the U.S domestically, I've never experienced any rounds of applause. I have noticed that on Asian airliners, passengers typically do applaud the staff for the service.

[ April 13, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]


I would like to add a joke here:

They applaud for the service in Asia because the service is real good in their airlines(example: Jet Airways, Singapore Airlines, Malaysian, Emirates).

The service from air-hostesses in US is so bad, I some times feel like only saving grace is the good landing by a pilot. So that is reason why there is applause is US sometimes(not always though)
 
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