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What day job ?

Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
I'm curious what the students doing the cattle drive do for a living. Now I now what quite a few of you do. But I'd like it all nice and together in one thread

I'm a mainframe programmer mostely PL/I. I'm in IT for 25 years.
Marilyn de Queiroz
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 22, 2000
Posts: 9044
    
  10
I've been a software developer since May 21, 2001. Before that I was in health sciences. I'm also a musician (I play viola in an orchestra). Although I don't make my living at it, it's my favorite hobby.

JavaBeginnersFaq
"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, and today is a gift; that's why they call it the present." Eleanor Roosevelt
Paul Selby
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 20, 2000
Posts: 41
I am a PROGRESS analyst programmer.
[This message has been edited by Paul selby (edited July 12, 2001).]
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Progress, close to Java & can you do OO in/with it ?
Michael Matola
whippersnapper
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 25, 2001
Posts: 1746
    
    2
I'm a (newbie) PeopleSoft application developer. I do occasional light programming (nothing very sophisticated) in PeopleCode and SQR (yucky, ugly, blechy languages). I'm pretty handy with SQL. I've also done data warehouse reporting with a product called BusinessObjects, but I've been moving out of that role.
Hobbies include travel, cross-country skiing, language(s)/linguistics (when I have time for it).
[This message has been edited by Michael Matola (edited July 12, 2001).]
jason adam
Chicken Farmer ()
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 08, 2001
Posts: 1932
I'm a, and I hate to admit it, NT Systems Administrator. I don't like Microsoft much, but it's easiness factor allowed me to move from teaching a science lab at an elementary school into the computer industry from relative ease.
Since I have been doing this for a couple of years now, I figured it was time to move into my real passion, programming. I started learning programming when I was 10, programming choose your own adventure stories with a friend of mine on a Apple IIe in Basic. Been playing with learning C/Perl on my own, and then started doing the OOP stuff with Java at the beginnning of this year.
Don't do anything with it in my job, but usually spend all my free time at work and a bit at home reading, doing tutorials, and writing little applets and stuff. Going for my master's in computer information systems with a focus on OO design and analysis, taking all the Java and C++ courses they offer.
That's me, you can wake up now
Jason
Richard Boren
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 01, 2001
Posts: 233
Mainly a mainframe programmer using COBOL. Have done some client/server coding using COBOL for the back-end and SQLWindows (an OO GUI IDE) for the presentation and Micro Focus Cobol for validation for the front-end. Been coding for 10yrs now.
Which brings up some good and bad news.
The good news: my company has decided on Oracle as their database of choice so I have started Oracle training. Also a new financial package will be selected and implemented within the next year or so and most likely it will be in JAVA.
The bad news: I have cut back on the time I spend here on the ranch and will probably not start on the servlet assignments anytime soon.
That said, I know I will stay involved with the JavaRanch and will most likely finish the Cattle Drive when I have finished my Orcale trianing.
Warning to the current and future JavaRanch staff. If the package selected does use java then I will highly recommend the JavaRanch as a source for training.
Matthew Phillips
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 09, 2001
Posts: 2676
I am a help desk analyst supporting network connected print and scan devices. My hobbies include playing bass guitar, programming, and role-playing games. I started learning Java out of boredom. I used to hate programming, but my brain changed the way it works and I now love it. I can hardly wait to start my programming career.
Matthew Phillips

Matthew Phillips
Greg Harris
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 12, 2001
Posts: 1012
i work for my dad at his commercial real estate office. i manage the bank accounts, create and maintain the website www.daveharrisrealty.comand even sell an occasional piece of property.
however, i am a junior in college studying computer science and mathematics. i have a pretty good grasp of c++ and obviously i am working on learning java. i hope to be in some sort of research field when i graduate.
oh yea, there were the 4 years in the US Navy... Electronic Warfare Specialist.


what?
Pauline McNamara
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 19, 2001
Posts: 4012
    
    6
A bad, but literal translation of my job title is usually "scientific collaborator", but no, I'm not a spy. I'm responsible for "coordination, service and support" for an environmental data catalogue, an internet database ( www.ch-cds.ch ). It's mostly administrative, but I get to learn about databanks, networks, internet and other fun geeky stuff along the way.
Our current querying application is written in java, and I recently had the privilege of taking a 5-day java programming course, so I can stay afloat during meetings with developers.
That's what I get paid for. My "living" really happens when I'm biking, jogging, reading, hiking, seeing movies, enjoying music, playing with language, goofing off, etc. etc.
[This message has been edited by Pauline McNamara (edited July 12, 2001).]
Daniel Dunleavy
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 13, 2001
Posts: 276
Started out on IBM doing Cobol/CICS/VSAM, and forced my way into more PC work. Finally ended up doing unix/oracle/PC work. Trying to learn Java with my real job and other "life issues" is proving difficult. Part of it is learning OO, but mainly it is just all the built-for-you stuff. With something like COBOL you have a short list of things it can do, and you build the rest yourself. Java has built a lot of stuff for you, but you have to figure out where it is and how it works.
Dan
Paul Selby
Ranch Hand

Joined: Oct 20, 2000
Posts: 41
Johannes asked:
Progress, close to Java & can you do OO in/with it ?
The short answer is No.
The long answer is :
The up-todate version of Progress aspires to be a quasi OO, however this mainly enables Progress to be developed with Visual tools and components.
Progress is a procedural language. It is strong and flexible as database (client-server) application software. It is a language, deve tool, and datavase all in one.
I was at a company which was going to really push the limits with the new versions quasi-OO-ness. It was really interesting stuff for me, unforatunely the company went into administration (i.e. voluntary receivership; went bust; hit the wall). This was a major disappointment for me, as the majority of the Progress market has a very tradition procedural approach. Such is life So, not very interesting.
Randy Trover
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 26, 2001
Posts: 34
Hi all,
I've been the Avalanche forcaster at Snowbird, Ut for the last 30 years. During the summer I work as a software developer using mostly Delphi and Oracle.
Cheers
Randy
Terence Doyle
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 30, 2001
Posts: 328
HI,
Well I've been trying to move into programming/web dev. for a year now. For the last 12 years I've been an English teacher in Spain. ( unemployed since May and loving it !!)
First I got into Javascript and DHTML. Then I took up an Open University ( in the UK ) course in C and assembly. This year I'm finishing off a Diploma in IT with C++ ( shame on me !! :-) ) and telecommunication protocols.
As if that wasn't enough I'm going for the SCJP in September.
I've also messed around with a bit of SQL, VB, Cold Fusion, Linux, etc.
All self-taught with the help of on-line tutorials and late nights.
My objective is now very close:
Come October ( after exams ) I'll be looking for my first programming job........

That's me,
Terry

Raising Flares debut album 'Ignition' out now

http://www.raisingflares.com

Terry Doyle <br />SCPJ 1.4 , SCWCD , SCMAD(Beta)
Joel Cochran
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 23, 2001
Posts: 301
Small company...many hats...
Director of Internet Services for VamaNet.com
Director of Research and Development for Mass Appraisal Systems.
I do some of all the following: coding, selling, Customer Service, travelling, public speaking, surfing, and a LOT of reading.
Mostly IBM eServer iSeries (AS/400) stuff in RPGIV/ILE. A lot of CGI programming and web development.
Hobby wise I like Golf and Pool(Billiards), and I play the Trombone. My biggest passion though is Woodworking.
------------------
I'm a soldier in the NetScape Wars...
Joel
[This message has been edited by Joel Cochran (edited July 13, 2001).]


Wait a minute, I'm trying to think of something clever to say...<p>Joel
Adam Vinueza
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 16, 2001
Posts: 76
Until May I was an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Colorado. Now, thanks be to social connections, I'm a paid intern at a small software development company. My work is jack-of-all-tradesish: for the past few weeks I've been doing apache server administration and web design, but soon I'll be doing some java programming, and probably some other things too. It helps that my boss expects me to take ten times as long to do anything as someone with actual training in, say, apache server administration.
Being married with two small children, most of my leisure time is spent doing family things with other friends with families. I sometimes long for the good old days when I could just sit around all day doing the Sunday Times acrostic, but I don't think I'll have days like that for another ten years or so.
Manju Jain
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 08, 2001
Posts: 168
I took up accounts in my under-graduation and completed C.A. Inter which is equivalent to CPA[ half-way ] in USA.
But for the past five years I've been in this software industry as a student, lab assistant in a training institute , then programmer and developer. Most of it has been in C/C++ . I have done projects in Foxpro, Oracle as well.
Currently, I am aiming for java and xml certification. I go back to C/C++ now and then to amuse myself.
Hooby - music , reading and badminton. I used to write poetry and lyrics. I want to do a lot more.
jytsika
Marilyn de Queiroz
Sheriff

Joined: Jul 22, 2000
Posts: 9044
    
  10
Originally posted by Pauline McNamara:
... I recently had the privilege of taking a 5-day java programming course, so I can stay afloat during meetings with developers.
Did you learn lots of new stuff?
Pauline McNamara
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 19, 2001
Posts: 4012
    
    6
Hi Marilyn,
Some was review and some was new. I'm not sure I could claim to have "learned" a lot of new stuff, but I certainly "got exposed to" some new stuff that I'm now working on absorbing. The timing of the course with my just starting the oop assignments couldn't have been better.
Being 5 days in a row, the class was necessarily intensive: we got a fair amount of concepts in a short time (exercises too). Since explanations therefore had to be short and pretty simple, I came away with a good overall framework, plus a basic understanding of some essentials: abstract classes, interfaces and exceptions (hadn't tasted those before). My understanding of concepts I'd already nibbled on (e.g. static, inheritance, overriding and polymorphismus) is now more solid. I think I finally grasp the stack and heap story. We also did some awt and some applets, new for me, but I'm not excited about them yet.
Seeing a lot all at once gave me the beginnings of a "big picture", a still slightly fuzzy picture, getting sharper slowly but surely. The knowledge I brought with me from javaranch definitely was a plus, and the assignments I'll be doing now will make the new material stick.
As always, the teacher makes a huge difference, and fortunately the course had an excellent one. Like here at the cattle drive .
Oh, and just as a reminder of what a good deal the cattle drive is: if an individual were to pay for the course I took (huge benefit for me, my employer paid) it would cost a whopping 10.4 times more than the cattle drive!!
Joe McGuire
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 19, 2001
Posts: 293
I'm a software engineer, mostly building e-commerce exchanges built on the WebLogic Server and Java. I've done programming or some kind of IT-related work off-and-on since a sophomore in college in 1985. I'm working more with UML, hoping to move into software design and architecture. My dad told me I'd never be able to support a family with that philosophy degree, but I knew I'd find a use for all that symbolic logic someday!
My hobbies are foreign languages, java (of course), and searching for the perfect tiki bar. But most of my spare time (well, all of my spare time) is spent with my three kids: Polly who just turned 6, and Francis and Thomas (twin boys) who just turned 3.
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Gee when will I learn. Looks like I created work. If you start a conversation people expect you to talk back so here goes
From the top :-
Marilyn it never ceases to amaze me how many people with totally "unrelated" backgrounds end up programming. I however see their "non IT" brackground only as a plus. Heck you can find IT solutions for your previous work/background. The best off course, if you can find a IT solution for your hobby/passion. hapiness is hobby = work
Micheal SQL is a good on to have on jour CV. As for Business Objects there pretty active around here. I have one of their consultants business card in my wallet in case I was interested
Jason You have my symphathy, I did system administration for a-while, and that's all I'm saying
Richard Nice mix mainframe and PC (network) based work. Best of both worlds. Good luck on the Oracle training. Not a bad idea training a group via the Cattle Drive.

Matthew Sure looks like we will have music around the campfire if we ever got together or does a bass guitar need electricity . Does you company know about your programming "dreams" ? My advise TELL THEM !!!
Greg Must be nice helping your dad out this way. Had a quick look at the site. Not bad at all. I miss the JSP though "Electronic Warfare Specialist", sounds like fun
Pauline It must be fantastic doing the CD first and then a course. Biking in Switseland seems like hard work.
Daniel I know the feeling, all my other IT education came "easy" compared to OO & Java.
Paul The problem with visual tools is that too much is done for you. As for interesting its what you make of it
Randy Delphi is great stuff. Pity it never really got as big as it derserved to be.
Terence "Unemployed and loving it". You born lazy SORRY it just sounds so funny, someone being happy that they have no income. Still in Spain ? Keep us informed on your progress.
Joel "Small company .. many hats.." the way to go !!!. By the way, my wife will kill for that step-ladder you make. No its not a hint I'm actually jealous of two types of people, religious and those with a "real" hobby
Adam Good social connections you have as for the Sunday Times acrostic. I'm a parent too I understand, but then we miss him when his not around the perfect catch-22
Jytsika Why the switch away from accounting ? Chartered Accountants earn a fortune around here. Though money is'nt everything ? Want to to much more programming or poetry & lyrics ?
Joe Looks like you have some real experience there man get out of here Seriously though, its good to see a possible designer / architect with some real experience to many out there without it. 6 and 3x2 and you still have time for the CD I'll only put you in the red after 90 days

Ok hope I did not miss anybody & I hope I matched my responses up with the right person. If not SORRRYYY !!!

[This message has been edited by Johannes de Jong (edited July 16, 2001).]
Stuart Goss
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 21, 2001
Posts: 169
I work for a firm who does its little thing in the telematics department. I'm in the terminals part and work here as a software engineer. I come from a scientific background. I finish studying in 2 weeks. My subject was Meteorology (climate, wheather etc.). I've done programming in FORTRAN77 and things like that. Java is really fun and it seems the firm wants me to learn c++ too ...
Stuart
Amber Woods
Ranch Hand

Joined: Mar 28, 2001
Posts: 111
I work for a small start-up company that is right now focusing on an internet based Java program. I have worked on some VB projects for them as well. I am here now but am currently looking for a more stable, better paying job.
I love reading, running, and most importantly playing with my 3 year old daughter (McKenzie). Someday I would like to learn to play the piano and tap dance


"Happiness is a way to Travel, <b>Not</b> a Destination" -- Unknown
Carol Murphy
village idiot
Bartender

Joined: Mar 15, 2001
Posts: 1194
I am a retired dancer ( I've been both a professional ballet dancer as well as a Vegas showgirl ) and I currently work fulltime as a pharmacy technician. From the theater to selling drugs! I also work part-time as a seamstress and substitute teacher. Programming became an obsession when I got hooked up with a charter school that did a lot of distance-learning and homeschool-type curriculums delivered over the internet. Didn't stay with them long, but I had to jump from complete computer illiteracy to knowing my way around the internet almost overnight. When I discovered JavaRanch I was hooked. I just have to figure out how this stuff works! Don't know if I'll ever try to make any income with it, but you never know what I'll be doing a year from now!
Terence Doyle
Ranch Hand

Joined: May 30, 2001
Posts: 328
Hi JDJ,
Unemployed in Spain doesn't mean no income (unemployment benefit)
Anyway my wife is helping to finance my return to studenthood and THAT's what I'm loving - my job had become a real burden.
If laziness is combining a distance-learning IT diploma, selt-teaching Java for certification, non-paying web development, 2 kids, ...... then I'm lazy
Yes I'm still in Spain - when are y'all going to get the Spanish Java Ranch up and runnin'? [ and get me off the unemployment line ]
but I may be going back to Ireland for 1-2 years to get Java experience on better/cooler projects than are available in this slight technological backwater. [ Spain is way behind Ireland in IT development but when they catch up I'll be here!!!]

Terry
[This message has been edited by Terence Doyle (edited July 16, 2001).]
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Sure looks like some of us are lucky enough to actually be employed in the IT industry, and some even lucky enough doing some real Java work.
Others with no IT background only have dreams to enter the wonderfull world of computers. For those I have the utmost respect (not that I dont have that for all others learning something new).
Keep on slogging away people. Every attempt submitted is a bit
more that you've learnt.
A kept Irishman in Spain. Now I've heard it all
Ian Cockcroft
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 05, 2001
Posts: 46
I'm a Game Ranger\Wildlife photographer
but there is not enough money in it so I been a Crystal Reports consultant for 3 years and get back to the bush as often as possible.
Now I am trying to move more into mainstream programming with JAVA


- Make it idiot proof and they'll make a better idiot!
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Ian both your previous endevor's dont count as jobs so how can you expect to get paid for them . Good luck on you Java hunt, take you elephant gun with when you go for interviews
By the way Ian I see Holland & Namiba has made it to the World Cup Cricket in 2003 that is being held down in your part of the world. Looks like I'll have to start saving
[This message has been edited by Johannes de Jong (edited July 18, 2001).]
Daniel Olson
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 05, 2001
Posts: 81
It is interesting reading about everyone's daytime jobs. I taught English and Linguistics at the university for about 12 years.
Now I work as a web developer at a publishing company. I started out doing Active Server Pages, but then we started also using Dynamo, a Java application server. Our company was recently acquired and five days ago the new company announced that they are closing our office.
In August I start working for an investment company doing web development. Right now they don't do much Java, but they may start going more that direction in the future. My future boss is trying to decide whether he wants to do .net or J2EE.
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Good luck Daniel
Greg Harris
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 12, 2001
Posts: 1012
JdJ, yes, Electronic Warfare Specialist was fun! what it really means is that i used an antena array to monitor the electro-magnetic spectrum... my computer system broke the radar signal into numerical parameters that represented the frequency, pulse repetition, scan rate (how fast the radar turns) and pulse repetition interval. and, if we could actually "listen" to the signal by attaching a speaker or headphones to the system. we also used an oscilliscope to visually look at the electronic signal.
all of that was to determine the function and type of radar, the platform it was on (ship, airplane, land, missile) and then decide if it was friendly or hostile. each radar has its own "fingerprint" so we could even tell if it was coming from the same ship we saw a few weeks earlier. my ultimate responsibility was to defend the ship against a hostile missile attack by active "jamming" of the other ship's radar or the missile's active homing radar.
of course, there is not a big demand for that in the civilian world... so i am learning to program. tony alicia (sp) programmed some of the equipment that the Navy uses on helicopters doing pretty much the same job as i did... pretty impressive.
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Sounds like Clancey type stuff Greg. Did you know Toney was "hanging" around here when you came here (the Ranch)?
Greg Harris
Ranch Hand

Joined: Apr 12, 2001
Posts: 1012
i never heard of tony before here... i posted something a few months ago about my job and tony said he had worked on a project for the Navy. actually, the only reason i knew what he was talking about is because of the job i did. most people in the Navy have no clue what it is because it is classified.
oh yea... Tom Clancy's books are great. sometimes i wonder how he gets his information because he is always dead-on. when the Kursk (Russian sub) sank he was interviewed by Newsweek and his theory was exactly what really happened. i had the same theory from the start, but it was not until a couple months ago that they finally admitted that it was what really happened. an experimental torpedo exploded in the tube and caused a chain reaction.
[This message has been edited by Greg Harris (edited July 22, 2001).]
Johannes de Jong
tumbleweed
Bartender

Joined: Jan 27, 2001
Posts: 5089
Were you in sub's ? I need space around me. Would die in these "tin-cans". Yes and trust me to spell Clancy wrong . They do say has has "contacts" in the US navy whatever that means . I loved his first books but dont like the new stuff that much.
[This message has been edited by Johannes de Jong (edited July 22, 2001).]
 
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