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want to Become a Java consultant in Future-distant Dream

 
James Mark
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Hi All,
What are the skills required for a Java Consultant?
Which Technologies should he learn?
Which Level of Proficiency people Expect?
and how to land in those kind of a jobs.
Please guide me
:roll: :roll:
 
arulk pillai
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Do you mean working via a consultancy firm or being an indpendent contractor?

What are the skills required for a Java Consultant? You need to have good hard skills (technical), soft skills (non-technical), and some level of domain knowledge.

Which Technologies should he learn? This depends on what you enjoy and what technologies/frameworks are sought-after. You can choose Java/JEE. .Net, SAP, etc. To be good at, you need to have a passion for what you choose. If Java/JEE is your interest then: Java, Spring, Hibernate, Servlets, JSPs, Struts, JSF, Maven2, and integration technologies like JMS & Web Services. Learn and experience the fundmentals, design concepts, design patterns, best practices, development methodologies, identifying and fixing performance issues, memory issues, transactional issues, etc.


Which Level of Proficiency people Expect? It varies, in general 3+ yrs of commercial experience. Some have 1 year experience repeated 3 times while others have real 3 years of experience. All depends on how proactive a person is in acquiring required skills, experience, and knowledge.

how to land in those kind of a jobs: Both newtorking and responding to job advertisements.
[ November 18, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
 
Chetan Parekh
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Did you check The Consultants' Consultant?
 
James Mark
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Thanks a lot for the Information Arulk.
I am a Java/J2EE Developer with 2 years of Exp. Working in a Financial Software and performing well in the Team.I have good Knowledge on Java,Spring,Hibernate, Servlets, JSPs, Struts.I am now learning EJB3 that can help to Enhance my Hibernate Skills also
I want to become an Indpendent contractor
Now I think IDE's and build Tools have a huge role to achieve those? :roll:
Am In in the right Direction
Please guide me.I reside in India
 
arulk pillai
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Now I think IDE's and build Tools have a huge role to achieve those?


they are good to have skills, but don't think that they play a huge role. A smart developer can learn new tools in no time, but it takes time to master the core cocepts and key areas.

These are general comments only and it is better to get a view from someone who is working as a contractor in India. I have been contracting in Sydney for the past 6 years and these are based on my personal experience and observation.

In a tough market tread carefully because permanent jobs give you a better job security. You can start preparing yourself now, so that when the market start to pick up again, you will be ready.

-- Start building a network.

-- Identify the key soft skills you can improve on - e.g. communication, anaytical & problem solving, interpersoanl, multi-disciplinary team approach, etc.

-- It is good that you already have Java,Spring,Hibernate,Servlets, JSPs, and Struts. Gain some hands on experience in integration technologies like JMS, Web Services, XML, XSL, XSDs, SOA, etc.

-- Learn to market your skills, experience, and capabilities more effectively.

-- Master the key areas. I make a mark in most of my contract assignements by

== improving performance, processes and development methodologies.
== identifying and fixing design flaws,concurrency issues, resource &
memory leaks, security holes, transaction management issues, etc


There are 3 reasons why employers look for contractors:

1. To allocate boring or monotonous tasks that none of their permanent staffs are keen to work on.

2. To bring in expertise and different perspective to the existing team.

3. To meet unexpected demand, growth, or deadlines.


Try to avoid the first reason. Good luck.
[ November 19, 2008: Message edited by: arulk pillai ]
 
James Mark
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Hi Arulk thanks,
you are legend in your own lifetime
 
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