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superlative omelette recipe

Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
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Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
does anyone have one? I'm like to find a personal recipe, as opposed to one I googled.

thanks!
M


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Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24183
    
  34

Very fresh eggs. Heavy pan. Low heat. Lots of stirring. Works every time.


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Dani Atrei
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Joined: Feb 17, 2004
Posts: 73
Might want to try the spanish omelette(tortilla de patatas). Take it with wine (Marques de Riscal, Campo Viejo, Faustino V, all these are reds, i don t think it goes well with white) and man you'll feel happy. Mind you it's hard to make, much harder than people think, many restaurants get it wrong (too dry, too cooked, not enough onion etc...) so if you taste one you think is nothing extra ordinary, then don t judge all tortillas from that.
You need bread with it, the good one (baguette, old fashion one).
The "real" one is made of: potatoes(hence the name patatas), eggs(duh), onions(red onions go nice with it), and that's it.

For 4 people:
5+- eggs
6+- medium potatoes (finely cut)
2+- onions (finely cut as well)

Some people add other ingredients

Dan


Si altas son las torres, el valor es alto - Alberti
Sania Marsh
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Joined: Jul 12, 2004
Posts: 469
My friends make indian-style omlette, I love it. I usually make a mix for it and keep in freezer.
Approximately, for 2 large eggs omlette, you would need:

1/4 of a small onion chopped,
1 teaspoon chopped fresh cilantro
pinch of red chillie powder
pinch of "Kasuri Methi" dried leaves (in indian stores)
salt

just mix everything with eggs and fry until slightly brown, fry both sides.




PS. I also make indian green-pea rice. Even my indian friends say that they feel like they are at home in India when eating it. Can share the easy recipie, if needed.
[ January 28, 2006: Message edited by: Sania Marsh ]
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
hmm...so, are you guys advocates of mixing the eggs and other assortments before putting them in the pan, or after? And how finely, in general, do you chop the tomatoes and onions? Lots of stirring during the actual cooking, or none at all?
Sania Marsh
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Joined: Jul 12, 2004
Posts: 469
Originally posted by Max Habibi:
hmm...so, are you guys advocates of mixing the eggs and other assortments before putting them in the pan, or after? And how finely, in general, do you chop the tomatoes and onions? Lots of stirring during the actual cooking, or none at all?


I usually stir during the cooking if there are no veggies, I also like milk omlette - that one needs lot of stirring.
If I add veggies, I beat eggs first, then add ingridients, and mix before cooking - no stirring during.
Onions should be very finely chopped.
Dani Atrei
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Joined: Feb 17, 2004
Posts: 73
Well the trick with the tortilla is to get the onions and the potatoes cooked before you mix with the eggs. So just fry them before (not too much) just enough so that they get a nice golden crust. Onions are a bit harder, just taste them.
As for mixing with eggs, I just fill 1/4 of the pan, add some potatoes and onions, then on for the next 1/4, add some potatoes and onions etc... Until everything is put in. You want to do this so that the potatoes and onions are distributed evenly.
The hardest thing, and this is hard, is not to burn the tortilla. Usually the top will still be juicy egg mush, and the bottom will start forming. Just use a rounded pan which is small enough so you can insert a big "platter" or spoon , lift the tortilla, and inspect the crust. Just turn it over when it is well formed and yellowishy/golden.
Now to turn, this is easy. The top usually still is a bit juicy so you can't flip the tortille unless you're an expert. Just use a plate which is large enough for the tortilla, place it on the juicy top face down and just turn the whole pan, then slide the tortilla back into place.
Hmmm getting hungry.
This is uber famous in Spain, used as well as "pinchos" with bread for a nice filler under the noon sun, goes nice with olives as well.
For the cutting, go with quarters, half a centimeter large max. And as i said, don t mix with the eggs, cook potatoes first.
Don't forget the wine. It's important(the nice one)

Dan
[ January 28, 2006: Message edited by: Dani Atrei ]
David O'Meara
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Joined: Mar 06, 2001
Posts: 13459

Why use google when we have our own search?
Thgree other matches found, including this
Michael Matola
whippersnapper
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Joined: Mar 25, 2001
Posts: 1746
    
    2
In my experience, the biggest problem beginning omelette-makers have is that they end up making something that is between an omelette and scrambled eggs. No. Pick one or the other.

For the record, I vastly prefer my scrambled eggs to my omelettes, but my wife loves my omelettes and they've received plenty of compliments from others too.

First, tools and ingredients. I use a dedicated non-stick pan for eggs (8-inch diameter, I'm guessing). Seriously, I've had it for more than 10 years and nothing other than eggs has been cooked in it. In this pan, I have to use at least 3 large eggs to make a decent omelette, otherwise there's not enough stuff cooking to make things work. I can make up to a 6-egg omelette, but at that point I usually get better results making two 3-egg omelettes. Of course, the eggs should be fresh. Also, many will recommend that you start with eggs that are at room temperature. (For morning eggs, get up early, set your eggs out on the counter, go back to bed for an hour.) I haven't decided whether this has detectable results or is just superstition.

Also, I'm taking classical omelettes here, not "fluffy" omelettes, which I don't particularly like and have never cooked myself. We call them "brain omelettes" because when done right, they look like sulci and gyri.

To me, the differences between omelettes and scrambled eggs:

Omelettes:
----------

Are cooked relatively quickly over medium-to-higher heat
Add water
Eggs have *not* been beaten into a single consistency
Are never stirred
Can be cooked (if you absolutely insist) until lightly browned

Scrambled eggs:
---------------

Cooked relatively slowly over medium-to-lower heat.
Add milk
Eggs have been beaten into a single consistency
Are stirred (how much depends on the size of curd desired)
Do not cook until browned

Let's cook.

Omelettes:
----------

Break at least 3 large eggs into a bowl. Add 1 teaspoon of water per egg. Puncture the yolks with a fork, then beat no more than 30 strokes. The idea is that you still have some strands of white and yolk, not all a single consistency. (I use the count of 30 to prevent me from beating them too much.)

Pour into into your heated pan (medium-to-higher heat) that has a little bit of fat in it (butter, olive oil, etc.) Do nothing for about 30 seconds. Then use something (heat-resistant spatula, wooden spoon, etc.) to pull 4 sections of the egg (north, south, east and west) to the center. Liquid egg should run to fill the places on the pan that you exposed. If not, tilt the pan so it does. After that cooks, pull 4 more sections to the center, usually 45 degrees off-set from the first pulls, and let that cook. Repeat as necessary. It's these little flows that create the characteristic folds.

Cook until bottom just starts to brown. Top is still very moist but should not have runnable liquid.

You're done cooking. Fold omelette in half while sliding onto a plate.

In the past, I used to flip the omelette in the pan by tossing up into the air (it's fun to practice!) and cook the other side for a few seconds. I've now decided that that's unnecessary (though impressive to onlookers).

Note: if you've got the heat too high, you'll probably get a big bubble during the initial 30-second do-nothing period. If you've got the heat too low, when you try to pull the egg to the center, there won't be enough cooked to pull.

Scrambled eggs:
---------------

Break at least 2 large eggs into a bowl. Add 1 teaspoon of milk per egg. Puncture the yolks with a fork. Beat until a single consistency. (I don't count the strokes.)

Pour into into your heated pan (medium-to-lower heat) that has a little bit of fat in it (butter, olive oil, etc.) Do nothing for about 30 seconds. Then use something (heat-resistant spatula, wooden spoon, etc.) to stir the eggs.

I stir the cooked part of the eggs into the center of the pan. Then let them cook some more. Then stir into the center again. Only a few cook/stir cycles are necessary. They're done when you have a single mass with still-creamy egg on the outside. The goal in my scrambled eggs is a single large curd (it's beautiful when you slice through it on the plate!) that still has creaminess. (Detractors would say my scrambled eggs are "runny." I personally don't have issues eating undercooked eggs that I've made myself, and in fact I prefer them that way.)

The "constantly stirring" school of scrambled egg-ology would have you, well, constantly stir the eggs. This is fine if you prefer lots of small curds instead of one large one like I do.

Under no circumstances cook until rubbery or brown.

Further thoughts:
----------------

For me, I add salt and pepper to the eggs before beating. For my wife, I don't. She prefers salting and peppering at the table.

Oh, fillings. My thoughts on filling an omelette are that if you have to add a filling, you haven't done a good job with the eggs in the first place. A good plate of eggs will stand on their own. OK, I'm only about half serious with that. Cook the filling separately then add to the top of half of the omelette at the very end, right before folding and sliding it onto a plate.

I'll also mix things into my scrambled eggs. My latest fascination is Genoa salami.

For the record, the best scrambled eggs I ever had in my life (and probably one of the best breakfasts ever) was at an inexpensive bed-and-breakfast in Keswick, England. It was a variation of a classic English breakfast. There was a link of organic Cumberland sausage made by friends of the proprietors. There was a grilled tomato fresh from their vegtable garden. The garnish (which I ate, of course!) was a sprig of rosemary from their bush. The scrambled eggs were deliciously creamy, cooked au bain marie. (My only experiment cooking scrambled eggs au bain marie gave miserable result. Must be some tricks to work out.)

One of my favorite "comfort meals" is omelettes or scrambled eggs, a simple salad, and crusty bread. My simplest salad: washed and spun Romaine lettuce, salt and pepper, a splash of rice wine vinegar, a couple of slivers of red onion, and a crouton or two if you're feeling decadent. Get the vinegar/salt balance right and you don't need to bother with oil. Seriously.

I'm off to the grocery. I'm making lavender shrimp for lunch.
Max Habibi
town drunk
( and author)
Sheriff

Joined: Jun 27, 2002
Posts: 4118
wow! That's exactly what I wanted: thank you, Michael.


I love the 'Ranch
[ January 29, 2006: Message edited by: Max Habibi ]
Raghav Sam
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Joined: Apr 12, 2001
Posts: 412
Originally posted by Michael Matola:
In my experience, the biggest problem beginning omelette-makers have is that they end up making something that is between an omelette and scrambled eggs. No. Pick one or the other.

For the record, I vastly prefer my scrambled eggs to my omelettes, but my wife loves my omelettes and they've received plenty of compliments from others too.


I cant agree more with you!!! My wife prefers the omelette I prepare more than she does hers..


Eggs have *not* been beaten into a single consistency


I use this approach both for Omelettes and Scrambled eggs.
[ February 03, 2006: Message edited by: Raghav Sam ]

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Raghav Sam
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Joined: Apr 12, 2001
Posts: 412
Sometimes I prefer these approaches for Omelettes:
A. My favorite:
1. Beat the eggs
2. Add just salt and black pepper.
3. Fry in low heat with frequent turnings so that both sides are evenly cooked.

B.
1. Fry finely chopped onions and tomatoes.
2. Then mix it with the beaten eggs and fry. Fried onions have a heavenly taste.
3. Garnish with coriander leaves.

C.
1. Start out with the idea of preparing an omelette.
2. When it is half done, scramble it into not too small pieces. Stir fry.
3. Eat with tomato sauce

D.
1. To the beaten eggs add little turmeric powder. This gives a pleasing light yellow colouring
2. Add little red chilli powder/chopped green chillies and salt.
3. Simmer fry.

E. Mixed Vegetable Omelette
1. Fry chopped onions, tomatoes, capsicum, cauliflower, carrots, beans, green chillies. This has to be separately fried as more vegetables are involved.
2. Once done mix with beaten eggs and fry in pan.
Ashok Mash
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Joined: Oct 13, 2000
Posts: 1936
I love the usual ham and cheese one!

Two eggs, add quarter a glass of milk and mix really well � I used a small blender and fluff it up really well. Spread a tiny bit of oil on a non-stick pan, on medium heat, pour the mix. Within a minute, as its starts to dry out, spread cheese slices and once they start melting, spread thin, cooked, ham slices. I also top it with mushrooms if I have any. In just minutes, without letting it to get too brown, I would fold it in half to stop it from breaking when I scoop it out of the pan. With a fine sprinkle of freshly ground pepper and salt, it�s the best brunch to start a chill-out weekend.


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