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Shifting from Java to .net

 
Shantanu Puranik
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Hello all,
I have four years of experience on Java/J2EE with SCWCD 1.4.
For past 2 years working with software arm of European engineering giant.
My company is situated at Pune, India.

Recently, I've been asked to join a team working on .net platform.
The reason given by manager is, there are no projects currently and in near future that will
require Java/J2EE skills.
Company is providing us 3 days training on ASP.net.
We will be working on some product for next 6-8 months minimum.
My boss says even this development is a stop gap arrangement till we get any project from client.

With in company I've no choice left but to work on .net platform.
The other option will be to look out for job change to stay on Java/J2EE platform.
I 've ruled out this option. Thanks to current market situation.
I've decided to take this change positively and acquire knowldge of .net platform.


Please share your opinion on how this decision might affect career in future.

Thank you.
 
Chetan Parekh
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Shantanu Puranik wrote:
With in company I've no choice left but to work on .net platform.
The other option will be to look out for job change to stay on Java/J2EE platform.
I 've ruled out this option. Thanks to current market situation.

This is good move. I would have done the same thing.
I would suggest that nothing wrong in testing the water. Apply in good companies for J2EE post and join them if you get good offer.
Shantanu Puranik wrote:
I've decided to take this change positively

You have already won half the battle !! :lol:
 
Henry Wong
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Agreed. There is nothing wrong with expanding your knowledge. A few years ago, I readily took a .NET project, just for the chance to learn C# and the .NET framework.

It's actually a pretty good framework. It's too bad that the project only lasted a few months -- and I had to go back to Java. I would have liked to stay longer...


Company is providing us 3 days training on ASP.net.



And you are getting trained at it too. All I got was an understanding that I may be less productive because I need some time to bring myself up to speed...

Henry
 
arulk pillai
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I agree with Henry. It would not hurt to expand your options.
 
Bobby Sharma
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I am very tensed with future of Java.I hope Java is not dead yet and all these crappy things are happening because
of freaking economy calamity.

People are asking for .net technologies and php.I had to start learning .net myself because in my region
they demand .net or php.When I am doing .net ,I am not in touch with Java.

So,I have a question : is that a good idea to integrate Java and .net? that way I don't have to stop working in Java.

I was born to love Java.

best regards,
omi
 
Kj Reddy
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Shantanu Puranik wrote:Hello all,
With in company I've no choice left but to work on .net platform.
The other option will be to look out for job change to stay on Java/J2EE platform.
I 've ruled out this option. Thanks to current market situation.
I've decided to take this change positively and acquire knowldge of .net platform.


Don't think about company change just because your current company asked to work on other technology even if the market is good. There is no guarantee that the new job will be only in the same technology. Just grab the opportunity to extend your knowledge as you may not get the opportunity every time. Moreover in current market scenarios having more knowledge will give you an edge over others.
 
Kj Reddy
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omi sharma wrote:I am very tensed with future of Java.I hope Java is not dead yet and all these crappy things are happening because
of freaking economy calamity.


As long as you have good programming skills you don't need to worry. If your programming skills are good you can write software even if it is not Java with some efforts to understand the syntax.
 
Bobby Sharma
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It's not about I am good programmer or not.It's about I hate MS technologies I don't know why.

If need be I can do ASM x86 but still want to do Java because I love it,even if it is big pain in a neck sometimes.

I have great desire to learn new technologies but not Microsoft's.

If they were Ruby or Python ,I would do with a charm.Because both have good integration with Java.

Not everybody's life is good and goes they want.Some have problems which cause hindrances.


best regards,
omi
 
Sandeep Awasthi
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It's good to like some technology. But it is not good to hate some technology. Whichever technology can make you survive in tough time you should learn if you are getting chance learn without you paying for learning.
 
Bobby Sharma
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Yea ,I can understand , I have to finish this mess.I will have to learn what they want.

Well C# is not that bad, after all it is Java's evil twin.I want to use Java-C# combo.

best regards,
omi
 
Tim Holloway
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.Net isn't all that bad, actually. My issue is that Microsoft has an enraging habit of replacing APIs that were never fully developed with brand-new, incompatible APIs, which in turn never truly get developed, and the circle repeats. The other issue I have is that while .Net and Java have the same theoretical grounding, Java has a solid wall between itself and the OS, and .Net does not. So I can run Java apps with confidence on Solaris, Linux and Windows without thinking twice. .Net apps are only 100% certain of being able to run on Windows, despite the fact that Mono does a very good job of running on Linux - because you never really know when a programmer will have grabbed an API convenience from the Windows-only stack.

As times get tight, the pressure to get it done fast and cheap gets more intense. Microsoft technologies benefit, since Windows developers are (as one manager I talked to once admitted) a "dime a dozen". And, of course, if the apps they produce are hack jobs, you can always blame Windows when they fail. Another big winner right now is scripting technologies such as PHP, Django (python), Ruby on Rails, and so forth. These are "instant gratification" platforms. Since they allow the creation of the publicly-visible parts of the app to be done rapidly. Unfortunately, the GUI is often only a third of a real app, and they overlook the fact that the reason why the GUI prototyping is so fast is that scripting languages generally have little or no compile-time checking, so all your bugs show up at run time. Which means in production, in many cases.

Over the years I've worked with many languages and platforms, and I've yet to find a "Silver Bullet". You can shift around where in the software lifecycle the work has to be done, but the overall amount of work is mostly independent of language and platform.

Java is a platform whose strengths lie in its ability to scale to very high workloads, best-of-breed security, an abundance of standardized support packages, many of which are plug-replaceable to make it easier to make price/performance tradeoffs, and strong development-time validation of code. Unfortunately, because of the extensive pre-coding design work and compile-time checking - including the fact that compiling ahead of time has to be done at all - the time before you show "results" is longer than the Instant Gratification crowd will tolerate.

Right now, people have a very high tolerance for very bad software. Maybe that will change someday. Toyota is now running car commercials saying that "Quality is the new Cool", and if that really became so, maybe Java would become more attractive.
 
Bobby Sharma
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I knew it you would come with great hit.

God asked me " Who is the man?"
I answered "Tim is the man" :P

best regards,
omi
 
Mike Isano
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.net is not language specific. You can continue programming with java (the language) in .net.

Problem solved!!!
 
Freddy Wong
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I once did a small .NET project. It was actually quite fun. If your environment happens to be only Windows, .NET seems to be a good choice compare to Java.

Technology ages over time and Java isn't immune to that. I love Java and I still do, but I also don't wanna close my eyes and ears and pretend that other technologies don't exist at all.

Remember, C# copied Java, but Java also copied C# later on (generics, annotations, etc). At the end, it's a win-win situation. Java language is getting richer now. So why not try to appreciate each technology and live with it

My 2 cents.
 
Bobby Sharma
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Hi , Freddy and Mike , how you doing guys?

I got it what you tried to tell me, in fact I already thought about it.But what bridge do you
recommend me?

I have tried JNBridge , is there any better?

best regards,
omi
 
Freddy Wong
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There's a JVM implementation in .NET. Mono uses it. It's called iKVM. I have personally never tried it, so I don't know how reliable it is.
 
Sagar Rohankar
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Hi all,

Some what similar situation I had, the only difference is, I shifted to C with ODBC db connectivity projects and not .NET.

From last two months I'm working on it and we will wrap it in coming one more month, so my worry is "What should I write in my resume/CV ?". I'm exactly 1 year old in this software industry, and when I told my prospective employer that out of 12 months only 8 months I worked on Java, How will he react? In my resume what should I write , I mean "Java experience resume" OR " C - ODBC Experience resume"

I still love Java and good in it..

What to do?
 
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