wood burning stoves 2.0*
The moose likes Meaningless Drivel and the fly likes Its all about spicy food Big Moose Saloon
  Search | Java FAQ | Recent Topics | Flagged Topics | Hot Topics | Zero Replies
Register / Login
JavaRanch » Java Forums » Other » Meaningless Drivel
Bookmark "Its all about spicy food" Watch "Its all about spicy food" New topic
Author

Its all about spicy food

S Venkatesh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 464

I heard that western food are not as spicy as continental food. How far it is true?

Thanks
Venkatesh S
Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
I met many Americans and Europeans and my experience says you heard right.


My blood is tested +ve for Java.
Sameer Jamal
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 16, 2001
Posts: 1870
Then why these western(Europian) countries used to import lots of spices between 14th to 19th century from India.
Christophe Verré
Sheriff

Joined: Nov 24, 2005
Posts: 14687
    
  16

I know people going to 'spicy' countries like Mexico and getting a nice diarrhea after eating. Not used to spicy meals.


[My Blog]
All roads lead to JavaRanch
S Venkatesh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 464

Originally posted by Satou kurinosuke:
I know people going to 'spicy' countries like Mexico and getting a nice diarrhea after eating. Not used to spicy meals.


LOL
Jim Yingst
Wanderer
Sheriff

Joined: Jan 30, 2000
Posts: 18671
Ummm, it's true that food in the US is usually (most always) less spicy than in Mexico or India. But traveller's diarrhea is generally caused by bacteria in the water, not spices.


"I'm not back." - Bill Harding, Twister
Jeff Albertson
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2005
Posts: 1780
Originally posted by Venkatesh Sai:
I heard that western food are not as spicy as continental food.


Continental food -- like Spaghetti Bolognese?
S Venkatesh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 464

Originally posted by Jeff Albertson:


Continental food -- like Spaghetti Bolognese?


'Spaghetti Bolognese' -- not aware of it :roll: :roll: whats that?
Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Originally posted by Venkatesh Sai:


'Spaghetti Bolognese' -- not aware of it :roll: :roll: whats that?


Spaghetti Bolognese
Anand Prabhu
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 19, 2003
Posts: 299
Yes, overall, they are not as spicy but there are some pockets in USA, like Louisiana, where one can get food tinged with cajun or other spices. I remember going to Popeyes while driving from Michigan to Illinois and I was surprised with the spiciness of their fried chicken .
Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636


Stuffed Mirchi
Raghavendra nandavar
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 26, 2005
Posts: 231
Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:


Stuffed Mirchi


Hmmmmmm, Yummmy (Dont have a smiley for this)
Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Originally posted by Raghavendra nandavar:


Hmmmmmm, Yummmy (Dont have a smiley for this)


Jeff Albertson
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2005
Posts: 1780
Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:

Spaghetti Bolognese


I would call that an "Englishman's Spaghetti Bolognese" -- it's downing in tomato souce. Consider this Wikipedia article instead.

And I was just poking gentle humor at the assumption that Continental cuisine implies Indian food. Reminds me of the old joke of the Englishman who tried to enter a building in Moscow, but was barred by the doorman who said "no foreigners allow". "I'm not a foreigner," he replied, "I'm British."
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
Marshal

Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24183
    
  34

Indeed, I read the first post and my thought was "WTF, American food is, on the whole, spicier than European food!" I've never heard anyone call "Indian" something "Continental" before; I suspect no one besides Indians say that.


[Jess in Action][AskingGoodQuestions]
Ram Bhakt
Ranch Hand

Joined: Dec 02, 2005
Posts: 145
After eating in Mexican restaurants, I have realized that spicy food is not same as hot (or chilli laced) food i.e. although spices contain hot ingredients including chilies but spices != chillies.

One of my gujju (read vegan) friends often eats Veggie burrito from BurritoVille in Manhattan. I had the misfortune of eating it once. That thing was so freakishly hot that it actually burnt (as in chemical burn) my tongue so severly that for 4 months I couldn't eat anything crusty and anything with even a hint of chilli. I consulted 4 doctors and had several medications including allergy medications. Nothing worked. One doctor even suggested that I might have diabetes and had me do blood sugar test. The condition cleared up after 4 months on its own. For all that time I was on a sweet or bland diet.

Mind you that I am used to eating very hot (as in spicy) foods. While in Bangalore, I was a a fan of "Andhra style" (read HOT!!!) restaurants and never had any problem.

While doing some reading on the the chillies that they use, I found out that there are about 10 levels of hotness in chillis. Habanero chilli is the hottest one and Jalopeno (the one you see on pizza) is among the milder ones. I can tell you that Habanero is a killer. If you rub it on your hand a little bit, you will get a blister. That's how hot it is.

The problem here in US is that when they say spicy they mean levels of chilli which is basically just one spice. So you can pretty much say that there are no "spicy" foods in american restaurants, only chilli foods. Their repertoir of spices is basically 3 things: pepper, cinnamon, and chillies. They don't even know what spices really are.

Oh yes, the chinese takes out have one additional "spice" in their repeortoir of spices: Monosodium Glutamate (aka ajinomoto)
[ March 31, 2006: Message edited by: Ram Bhakt ]
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 29, 2003
Posts: 8791
I've gotten the impression from comparative eating that "authentic" Mexican is often not very hot. Americanized Mexican or Tex-Mex can be, though the pepper sauces tend to be more flavorful than fiery.

Cajun can be pretty hot, too. I loved walking around New Orleans where the Tabasco smell just rolls out the open doors of the restaurants. I checked on the McIlhenny Company right away after Katrina. They're ok.

The most painfully hot food I've had was Chinese in NYC. It was overloaded with tiny peppers. I usually like them, but not in such numbers! Some Thai takeout somebody brought to the office at midnight ran a close second for hot.

Our office cafeteria brings in Indian food from a local restaurant a few times a month. The chick peas have a very nice burn. Yum.

So who has the blandest food? I had peas & carrots boiled to death with no salt and pepper in England once. Ok, every day.


A good question is never answered. It is not a bolt to be tightened into place but a seed to be planted and to bear more seed toward the hope of greening the landscape of the idea. John Ciardi
Dave Lenton
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jan 20, 2005
Posts: 1241
Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
Indeed, I read the first post and my thought was "WTF, American food is, on the whole, spicier than European food!" I've never heard anyone call "Indian" something "Continental" before; I suspect no one besides Indians say that.
I was also a bit confused - I'm used to the word "continental" being used to mean "European", because of the strange British tendency to forget that we're also part of Europe.

Goes to show the context is a large part of communication....


There will be glitches in my transition from being a saloon bar sage to a world statesman. - Tony Banks
Bo Yyempeti
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 22, 2006
Posts: 111
In India, continental food refers to food from "the continent" i.e. Europe.
(eg Lasagna, spag bol, pizza, all and sundry pasta all fall under "continental cuisine")

Just like Indian food in the UK is anglicised, the "continental" food in India is quite Indianised.

Interestingly, I have found that Europeans have more words in their native languages to describe spicy - e.g. mustard is "sharp", chillies are "hot".
Ernest Friedman-Hill
author and iconoclast
Marshal

Joined: Jul 08, 2003
Posts: 24183
    
  34

Originally posted by Bhoooooo Yyempeti:
In India, continental food refers to food from "the continent" i.e. Europe.
(eg Lasagna, spag bol, pizza, all and sundry pasta all fall under "continental cuisine")

Just like Indian food in the UK is anglicised, the "continental" food in India is quite Indianised.


Ah, thanks for that. Now I understand the question.
S Venkatesh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 464

Some delegates from US had come to india a few days back. They tried south indian food. They could not resist the hot and spicy nature of the food i think. They started sweting and thei eyes were filled with tears. :roll: :roll:
Manish Hatwalne
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 22, 2001
Posts: 2578

Give them Ulli Theeyal & Appam!! Divine with virgin Pinacolada after this!!! Yum Yum

- Manish
S Venkatesh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 464

Originally posted by Manish Hatwalne:
Give them Ulli Theeyal & Appam!! Divine with virgin Pinacolada after this!!! Yum Yum

- Manish


Chetan Parekh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Sep 16, 2004
Posts: 3636
Once me and my German friend had Pani Puri.

I enjoyed and he cried.
S Venkatesh
Ranch Hand

Joined: Jun 27, 2005
Posts: 464

Originally posted by Chetan Parekh:
Once me and my German friend had Pani Puri.

I enjoyed and he cried.


wow pani puri
we get in south india also but its not as good as the one we get in north india
 
permaculture playing cards
 
subject: Its all about spicy food