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Agile Testing - a new strategy being applied?

 
Raghavan Muthu
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Hi Authors,

It seems to be a good book which is an eye-catcher. Though there are many other testing processes and methodologies, what extent this Agile Processing differ? Are you introducing or discussing any new strategies/patterns for the same?

Thanks,
Raghavan alias Saravanan M.
 
Paul Sturrock
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Differ from what specifically? Answering how Agile differes from every other development approach could take a while


Are you introducing or discussing any new strategies/patterns for the same?

Strategies and patterns for what specifically?
 
Raghavan Muthu
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Paul Sturrock wrote:Differ from what specifically? Answering how Agile differes from every other development approach could take a while

Strategies and patterns for what specifically?


Hi Paul,

I meant to ask, to what extent this Agile Testing differs from the existing methodologies. I am aware of the agile approach but not the agile testing!
 
Ilja Preuss
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As far as I can tell, the requirements for testing are quite special in Agile projects - *all* existing tests need to be able to executed often and quickly, preferably *at least* once a day. And all tests for new functionality need to be finished at the end of the iteration. That's quite challenging to many. I would expect that this book condenses the author's experience on how to make it actually work.
 
Raghavan Muthu
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That's great. Thank you Ilja. In such case there is no difference between the *development* and *testing* in the Agile. The development is (based on Feature Driven or Iterative Driven), so as the testing. Is nt it? Pretty interesting!

That's why I asked is there any specific pattern they would tend to call the whole set of testing process?
 
Ilja Preuss
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If you mean that implementation and testing happen in parallel, instead of in sequential phases - yes, that's the ideal.
 
Jeff Langr
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Raghavan Muthu wrote:I am aware of the agile approach but not the agile testing!


Yeah, honestly I'm happy to see some attention paid to what I feel has been a sorely neglected topic. There's been a dearth of good material available on this. That's why I ask so many questions about what's in the book. I think I have a good idea of what agile testing is and how it should work, yet I learn new things every iteration (well, that's true about anything, but particularly true in this area).

Jeff
 
Raghavan Muthu
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Ilja Preuss wrote:If you mean that implementation and testing happen in parallel, instead of in sequential phases - yes, that's the ideal.


Thanks Ilja! . In such case, I guess though both of them happen in parallel, they do follow their own sequential (continous) iterative progression. Right?

 
Raghavan Muthu
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Jeff Langr wrote:
Raghavan Muthu wrote:I am aware of the agile approach but not the agile testing!


Yeah, honestly I'm happy to see some attention paid to what I feel has been a sorely neglected topic. There's been a dearth of good material available on this. That's why I ask so many questions about what's in the book. I think I have a good idea of what agile testing is and how it should work, yet I learn new things every iteration (well, that's true about anything, but particularly true in this area).

Jeff


Thank you Jeff. You are right indeed and thats what the subject seems to be keeping intact!
 
Lisa Crispin
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Raghavan Muthu wrote:Hi Authors,

It seems to be a good book which is an eye-catcher. Though there are many other testing processes and methodologies, what extent this Agile Processing differ? Are you introducing or discussing any new strategies/patterns for the same?

Thanks,
Raghavan alias Saravanan M.


It's hard to distill a large book into a quick answer here, but I'll try! I wouldn't say there are wildly new ideas in the book. Rather, we explain how to apply agile principles, values and practices to help the team do a good job of guiding development with tests and delivering appropriate value to the customers. We also wanted to provide help for testers who are used to more traditional phased and gated processes to transition to an agile team.

Transitioning to agile development can amplify problems inherent in traditional software projects. For example, testing is often "squeezed to the end" of a project. Some teams manage to do this in two-week agile iterations, too, turning them into "mini-waterfalls". We've found it works better to get the whole team committed to testing and quality, use tests (including at the acceptance or business-facing level) to guide development, and make coding and testing part of one process, highly integrated, with testers, programmers and customers collaborating all the time.

We expand on Brian Marick's "Agile Testing Quadrants" to help agile teams plan for all the different types of testing they will need to do. We also emphasize things like automating regression tests so that there is enough time for critical exploratory testing.

There's lots more in the book - see some of the other answers here.
-- Lisa
 
Raghavan Muthu
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Lisa Crispin wrote:

It's hard to distill a large book into a quick answer here, but I'll try! I wouldn't say there are wildly new ideas in the book. Rather, we explain how to apply agile principles, values and practices to help the team do a good job of guiding development with tests and delivering appropriate value to the customers. We also wanted to provide help for testers who are used to more traditional phased and gated processes to transition to an agile team.


Very true Lisa.

For example, testing is often "squeezed to the end" of a project.


A greatest level of deviation if this strategy is changed. Perfect.


We expand on Brian Marick's "Agile Testing Quadrants" to help agile teams plan for all the different types of testing they will need to do. We also emphasize things like automating regression tests so that there is enough time for critical exploratory testing.


This is what I had been looking for. I guess the 'Agile Testing Quadrants' has some good features in store for the well sake!

Thank you very much Lisa!
 
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