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Regarding Agile Testing, name some Automated Testing tools

 
Mike Farnham
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So with regard to the book "Agile Testing,
please name some automated testing tools.

Also, is Agile Testing applicable to software development without regards to language,
as long as an Automated Testing tool is available?

 
Janet Gregory
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There are many different tools that can be used in agile projects by testers, assuming that is what you are talking about. The main thing to remember when choosing a took is that it needs to work for the whole team. A tool that helps you define your acceptance tests before the the coding is started is prefered. That will help the testers keep up with the developers and work closely with them.

Agile development is independent of language. Any team that wants to practice iterative development and small releases that deliver business value can practice agile development although there is much more to agile than that.

Janet
 
Lisa Crispin
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Mike Farnham wrote:So with regard to the book "Agile Testing,
please name some automated testing tools.

Also, is Agile Testing applicable to software development without regards to language,
as long as an Automated Testing tool is available?


In addition to what Janet replied, we do give examples of automated test tools in the book, but we didn't go into a lot of specific details. Tools change too fast. The tool Tip and I used for all our automation examples in Testing XP (back then there weren't so many of these great open-source tools) doesn't exist any longer.

A few of the tool examples in our book are FitNesse, Watir, Selenium, Canoo WebTest. We also give several examples of home-brewed tools and explore the pros and cons of home-brewed, open source and vendor tools, and how to go about identifying your tool requirements, researching and evaulating tools.

We have a list of good places to find tool ideas in our bibliography. Rick Hower's site is a good resource, www.softwareqatest.com.

Although test automation is a core practice on agile teams, agile development (as Janet said) is independent of tools. The key IMO is adopting a whole-team approach to solving problems such as test automation, and finding ways to deliver good software.

 
Jeff Langr
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Lisa Crispin wrote:... how to go about identifying your tool requirements, researching and evaulating tools.


I'd be interested in that list of criteria. From my standpoint, two of the more important considerations for agile testing would seem to be accessibility and ability for the tests to be reasonably self-documenting. I can think of a number of other things. What do you feel is most important to consider?

Thanks,
Jeff
 
Lisa Crispin
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Jeff Langr wrote:
Lisa Crispin wrote:... how to go about identifying your tool requirements, researching and evaulating tools.


I'd be interested in that list of criteria. From my standpoint, two of the more important considerations for agile testing would seem to be accessibility and ability for the tests to be reasonably self-documenting. I can think of a number of other things. What do you feel is most important to consider?

Thanks,
Jeff

Here are some of the questions we like to ask the team:
What tools do you already have?
Do you need a tool that will easily integrate into your continuous build process?
Will your hardware support the automation?
Who will use the test tool? Who'll write the tests? Do both customers and programmers need to feel comfortable with the tool?
Do you have distributed team members who need to collaborate?
Who will automate and maintain the tests?
What skills are already on your team? (eg, if you code in Java, a tool that uses Java or Groovy for scripting might be appropriate).
What's your development environment? Do you need the tool to integrate into a particular IDE?
What type of testing are you going to do? What type of app are you testing?
-- Lisa
 
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