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Agile Testing verses Agile Method

Roger F. Gay
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Joined: Feb 16, 2007
Posts: 399
Does your book attempt to custom match specific agile testing approaches to each of a variety of agile methods (Extreme, Scrum, Crystal, etc.), or does it provide a more general approach that can be adapted to whatever method is used?

I ask because there are certain circumstances in which pre-documenting and explaining the method being used is quite important. Sometimes the process I face is different than getting together with a committee and knocking out a specification on how the process will proceed. Being able to put forth a case for a particular method (including testing) along with citations can be helpful. So - if your answer is that you take a more general approach - feel free to comment on how you would use the information in the book to put forth a specific point-by-point recommendation on how the whole process will work. (If you match testing approach to method, with an explanation as to why, this would pretty much be done for me I'd guess.)


Correlation does not prove causality.
Janet Gregory
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Joined: Jan 25, 2009
Posts: 31
Hi Roger,
Our book does not attempt to map testing to any one methodology. Instead it is about a general approach.

Personally, I like to develop a process and then document it rather than the other way around. It is easier to change things when they don't work first time.

If I had to write a process first, I would keep it very general and involve the whole team in defining it. Something like...
During iteration planning meetings, testers participate by asking clarifying questions, helping the customer to define acceptance tests ... etc. Testers will work closely with the developers to write tests and execute them during the iteration. During the end game, testers wil ....

I like pictures and flow diagrams too.... :-)
Janet

Co-author, with Lisa Crispin: Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (Addison-Wesley, 2009) www.janetgregory.ca
Roger F. Gay
Ranch Hand

Joined: Feb 16, 2007
Posts: 399
Janet Gregory wrote:Hi Roger,
Our book does not attempt to map testing to any one methodology. Instead it is about a general approach.

Personally, I like to develop a process and then document it rather than the other way around. It is easier to change things when they don't work first time.

If I had to write a process first, I would keep it very general and involve the whole team in defining it. Something like...
During iteration planning meetings, testers participate by asking clarifying questions, helping the customer to define acceptance tests ... etc. Testers will work closely with the developers to write tests and execute them during the iteration. During the end game, testers wil ....

I like pictures and flow diagrams too.... :-)
Janet


Yes, I agree. We shouldn't document a process without knowing what it is - or at least, not go beyond what we know will work.
 
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subject: Agile Testing verses Agile Method